Shop

[US-Shop | German Shop]

Selected Works
The complete Poems
by John Bernard (Editor)
Paperback (731 pages)
1997

The standard edition including all poems.

  More information Keats: Truth and Imagination (Illustrated Poetry Series)
by K. E. Sullivan (Editor)
Hardcover (96 pages)
1999

  More information
The complete Poems of John Keats (Modern Library)

Hardcover
1994

The standard edition including all poems.

  More information The love poems of John Keats: In Praise of Beauty

Hardcover - 64 pages
1990

The standard edition including all poems.

  More information

Letters of John Keats: A Selection (Oxford Letters & Memoirs)
by Robert Giddings (Editor)
Paperback - 417 pages
1970

Audio Books

More information   Realms of Gold: The Letters and Poems of John Keats (unabridged)
by John Bernard (Editor)
Audio CD
1999
Also available as a Cassette

The Poetry of Keats
by Ralph Richardson (Narrator)
Audio Cassette
1996

Keats surpasses the best of poets in the sensual song of life, ravishing the senses with beauty of phrase and leaving us with a pleasurable and perennial memory of a truly graceful and magnificent wordsmith. The audio includes Ode on a Grecian Urn, "Ode to a Nightingale, To Autumn, When I Have Fears That I May Cease to Be, "On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, and many others.

  More information

John Keats : Poems
by Douglas Hodge (Narrator)
Audio Cassette
1970
With an introduction by David Bromwich
Treasury of John Keats
by Robert Giddings (Editor)
Audio Cassette
1987
John Keats: Selected Poems
Audio Cassette
1997

Biographies

Darkling I listen: The Last Days and Death of John Keats
by John Evangelist Walsh
Paperback (731 pages)
1997

In November 1820, John Keats set foot in Rome for what he hoped would be a swift convalescence. Exactly 100 days later, he succumbed to consumption, dead at the age of 25. This elegiac and fascinating book brings to light the last days of his life, his tragically unrealized future ambitions, and the view he saw from his room overlooking the Spanish Steps. Keats' love affair with young Fanny Brawne has long fascinated biographers, but John Evangelist Walsh shows for the first time how complex their relationship was, and how the events at the end of Keats' life illuminate the whole of their affair. He also discusses Keats' views on religion and the exact nature and progress of the illness that killed him. This book is a must-read for those interested in Keats and will delight anyone who follows Walsh on his exploration into the life and death of a supremely gifted and tragic poet.

  More information
Keats
by Andrew Motion
Hardcover (576 pages)
1998
Also available as a Paperback

Whitbread Prize-winning biographer Andrew Motion (Philip Larkin: A Writer's Life) aims to broaden our understanding of John Keats (1795-1821) by paying close attention to the historical context in which he wrote and the political opinions he voiced. The poet was "of a sceptical and republican school," Motion argues, and Keats's work reflected his experiences "not just as a private individual, but socially and politically as well." This bracing reinterpretation stresses the vigor of Keats's character as well as his verse, burying for good the sentimental cliché of a sickly dreamer concerned only with art for art's sake. (Review by Amazon.com)

  More information
More information   John Keats
by Walter Jackson Bate
Paperpack (188 pages)
1979
Book of the Heart: The Poetics, Letters, and Life of John Keats (Studies in Imagination)
by Andres Rodriguez
Paperback
1993

Andrés Rodríguez’s study of Keats’s Letters is much more than that. It is a wonderfully rich meditation on the Letters as a grand poem about the poetics of living. Book of the Heart gives the Letters the central place in our literature they deserve. This is a book for all kinds of readers about the power of the life of imagination."

  More information

Keats-Studies

More information   The persistence of Poetry: Bicentennial Essays on Keats
by Robert M. Ryan (Editor) and Ronald A. Sharp (Editor)
Hardcover (232 pages)
1999

Contains 17 Essays.

Romantic Bards and British Reviewers: A Selected Edition of the Contemporary Reviews of the Works of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, and Shelley
by John O. Haydon (Compiler)
Hard Cover
1976

This collection of sixty-eight reviews (from twenty-six periodicals) of the five major English Romantic Poets provides a missing link in the history of Literary Criticism. Rarely has any similar collection gone beyond the two or three major reviewing periodicals, and reviewing was far more extensive and vigorous than such limited selections would suggest. But more: the editor, who is the recognized authority in the field, has aimed to represent both the poets and the Reviews. The text, moreover, has been annotated.

  More information
More information   The Dialogic Keats: Time and History in the Major Poems
Michael J. Sider
Hardcover (216 pages)
1998

The standard edition including all poems.


Approaches to Teaching Keats's Poetry (Approaches to Teaching World Literature, No 35)
by Walter H. Evert (Editor), Jack W. Rhodes (Editor)
Paperback (163 pages)
1991

John Keats (Modern Critical Views)
by Harold Bloom (Designer) and William Golding
Library Binding (225 pages)
1989


Keats's Odes and Contemporary Criticism
by James O'Rourke
Hardcover (256 pages)
1998

James O’Rourke examines the ways in which the modern reception to Keats’s major odes reveals the investments made in these poems by successive generations of critical schools, particularly New Criticism, psychoanalysis, deconstruction, and New Historicism. O’Rourke’s reading of the odes locates them within the connects of literary and cultural history and recovers the innovative force f the poems in a way that speaks to the aesthetics and the politics if the present.
While the themes of Keats’s odes are characteristically Romantic, they are also very modern. O’Rourke’s analysis shows how such familiar Romantic themes as the pathos of solitude ("Ode to a Nightingale"), the inaccessibility of the past ("Ode on a Grecian Urn"),the excess of ! ! melancholia ("Ode on Melancholy"), and the beneficence of nature ("To Autumn") become culturally coded as "female," and he demonstrates how they confront the reader with familiar ideas in surprisingly fresh forms. This original study does much to illustrate what Keats’s most virtuosic work has to say about history, nature, gender, ourselves, and each other. Review by the Publisher

Bibliophilia

John Keats poetry manuscripts at Harvard: A Facsimile Edition
by Jack Stillinger (Editor) and Helen Hennessy Vendler (Photographer)
Hardcover (266 pages)
1990

Contains 140 photographs of Keats' own manuscripts. Each photograph is accompanied by an exact transcription, as well as a standard version of the text. With an essay on the manuscripts by the photographer.

The Charles Brown Poetry Transcripts at Harvard: Facsimiles Including the Fair Copy of Otho the Great (Manuscripts of the Younger Romantics)
by Jack Stillinger (Editor)
Hardcover
1988