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Re: Bright Star in John Keats: A New Life

PostPosted: Sat May 11, 2013 8:20 pm
by Ravenwing
Adieu.

Re: Bright Star in John Keats: A New Life

PostPosted: Sat May 11, 2013 9:31 pm
by Ravenwing
Adieu.

Re: Bright Star in John Keats: A New Life

PostPosted: Mon May 13, 2013 2:10 am
by Ennis
Ravenwing wrote:Hi Ennis,

Thank you for having described in detail those books.

After reading your reply, I was able to find images of handwritten manuscripts, as pertaining to Keats' Lamia and his Ode on a Grecian Urn, as well as images of Keats Poems Published in 1820, edited by Robertson.

In looking at the following images, we can see Keats' handwritten manuscript of Lamia, and the copy text of Lamia in Keats Poems Published in 1820, edited by Robertson, which, as you had mentioned in your previous reply, claims to be an exact duplication of Keats' Lamia, Isabella, The Eve of St. Agnes, and Other Poems that was published in 1820 by Taylor and Hessey.

We can also see that there are differences between what Keats actually wrote, and what Taylor and Hessey, and by extension, Robertson, printed. The following image of Keats' handwritten manuscript of Lamia shows:

Image

whereas an image of Robertson's Keats Poems Published in 1820 shows:

Image

The two are not the same, as lines 5 and 6 in Keats' handwritten manuscript does read:

Frighted away the Dryads and the fauns.
From rushes green, and Brakes and cowslip'd lawns,


whereas Robertson's Keats Poems Published in 1820 does read:

Frighted away the Dryads and the Fauns
From rushes green, and brakes, and cowslip'd lawns,


As we can see, those editors capitalized the word "fauns", but Keats did not, and they printed in lowercase the word "Brakes". Furthermore, they introduced a comma after "Brakes". Also, it seems that they omitted a period after "fauns". Perhaps what seems to be a period in Keats' handwritten manuscript at the end of line 5, is merely from dust that was on the machine used to scan that image, or perhaps that actually is a period which Keats wrote.

Regardless of whether or not that is a period at the end of line 5 in Keats' handwritten manuscript of Lamia, we can see, with certainty, that what exactly Keats had written in other parts of his Lamia manuscript, is not actually the same as what those editors had printed.

Another example of Keats' original poems as adulterated, is proven by looking at the following image of George's 1819 handwritten manuscript of John Keats' Ode on a Grecian Urn, which shows:

Image

whereas an image of Robertson's Keats Poems Published in 1820, shows:

Image

Again, the two are not the same.

In line 1, "Thou" is capitalized by George Keats, and the word "quietneſs" is written with a long s, and also with a short s; but Taylor and Hessey had printed "THOU", and "quietness".

In line 2, George wrote "foster child"; but Taylor and Hessey had printed "foster-child".

In line 3, George wrote "Historian", "can'st", and "expreſs"; but Taylor and Hessey had printed "historian", "canst" and "express".

In line 4, George wrote "rhyme,"; but Taylor and Hessey had printed "rhyme:". Also, it seems that Taylor and Hessey omitted an M dash that George wrote after "rhyme,".

In line 5, Taylor and Hessey omitted the comma that George wrote after "shape,".

In line 6, George capitalized "Deities,"; but Taylor and Hessey did not. Also, Taylor and Hessey omitted the comma that George wrote after "Deities,".

In line 7, Taylor and Hessey omitted the comma after "Tempe,", and they also wrote "dales" without capitalization whereas George did capitalize "Dales".

In line 8, George capitalized "Gods"; but Taylor and Hessey did not.

In line 9, entire words are different, as George's manuscript of Keats' poem reads: "What love? what dance? what struggle to escape?" whereas Taylor and Hessey had printed: "What mad pursuit? What struggle to escape?"

In line 10, George wrote "what wild extacy?"; but Taylor and Hessey had printed "What wild ecstasy?".

As we can see, there is nary a line in the poem's first ten lines that was not altered in some way by Taylor and Hessey, from its manuscript that was handwritten by George Keats (likely, as faithfully copied from less neatly written manuscripts by Keats' own hand). With so many changes made by Taylor and Hessey to Keats' Lamia, as well as his Ode on a Grecian Urn, we should question if there is even one of Keats' poems that Taylor and Hessey had printed but did not change from how Keats himself composed it.

As such, Ennis, I disagree with the statement which you put forth, that "Robertson made a concerted effort to be true to the original" because Robertson was only being "loyal to Taylor and Hessey's 1820 Lamia, Isabella, The Eve of St. Agnes, and Other Poems" publication, but Taylor and Hessey themselves were not true to Keats' original handwritten manuscripts. Robertson, in 1909, had printed a perfect copy of a faulted copy—he was not true to Keats' original handwritten manuscripts; rather, he conformed to what Taylor and Hessey had printed—which was their rendering of Keats' poems.

From Ravenwing.


The statement I put forth was merely the one put forth by Robertson.

Re: Bright Star in John Keats: A New Life

PostPosted: Mon May 13, 2013 2:15 am
by Ennis
Ravenwing wrote:Hi Saturn,

It is a stunning oversight of Keatsian scholarship that his poems and letters which each have a surviving manuscript, have generally not been published in strict accordance with how he actually wrote them.

As the books John Keats: A Poet and His Manuscripts by Stephen Hebron, and John Keats: Poetry and Manuscripts at Harvard, A Facsimile Edition do contain more facsimiles of Keats' handwritten manuscripts than any other books, that makes them to be the closest there is, thus far, to that book of John Clare's poems which you mentioned, and as such, the most valuable books of Keats' poems and letters, because it shows how Keats himself would have published his poems, if he had had complete freedom to do so, as all other publications of his works—including those published during his lifetime—merely contain renderings of his poems and letters.

Ennis, does that book by Stephen Hebron, as well as that Harvard book by Stillinger and Vendler, also show those poems and letters of Keats in typeset?

From Ravenwing.


Ravenwing,

The Hebron book does not, but the Harvard book does.