Bon anniversaire

Discussion on the works of John Keats.

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Bon anniversaire

Postby Saturn » Wed Jul 14, 2004 9:34 am

Liberte, Egalite, Fraternite!!!


Bon 14 Juillet , l'anniversiare de la revolution francais.

I was in France for the bicentenary in 1989 and know how alive the memory of that great event is in the hearts of the French people - it was their great bequest to Europe and the world to the enduring spirit of human progress.

Keats and his contemporaries all lived in the monolithic shadow of the French Revolution - how it influenced him is apparent in his humane, liberal views.

“The brutalities of progress are called revolutions. When they are over we realise this: that the human race has been roughly handled, but that it has advanced.” - Victor Hugo.

The French Revolution - a brutal, yet sublime emodiment of the collective will of the people in motion.
Sure there were great evils perpetrated in the name of progress, but it was one of those events which history and reason is powerless to surpress. It was the overflowing of injustice, to the very brim, to the point where the pressure of centuries of oppression was like a wave of indignation crushing the feeble, stagnant wave of tyrants.

End of lecture....


Any thoughts.
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
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The French Revolution?

Postby MonroeDoctrine » Wed Jul 14, 2004 4:27 pm

There were great French intellectuals during that time period such as Lazare Carnot, and Gaspard Monge but the Jacobin mob was a disaster. The most unfortunate thing is that Napolean ended up creating a dictatorship and taking control over the armies Carnot and Monge had built up against the chaotic situation.
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Postby Saturn » Wed Jul 14, 2004 9:00 pm

The actions of Robspierre and the directory government in the 'terror' of 1793 was an indelible stain on the ideals of the republic which all sensible people deplore. Napoleon was a tyrant, and worst of all a militaristic tyrant in the Alexander/Caesar mode who subverted and exploited the aims of the revolution for his own deplorable objectives.

What I was really trying to say was that despite the many horrors that the revolution entailed, ultimately it was an epoch of opportunity, where 'careers were open to talent' - for the first time in modern history the people could finally gain recognition due to their own merits and not because of the ridiculous notion of aristocratic pedigree and patronge.

If Keats had been born only fifty years or so earlier, he might never have produced such worka s he did, as he may have had to rely on patronage to maintain his art.
Being born in the post-revolutionary era, he was of the first generation of artists reliant solely on their own resources and free to dictate the will of the Muses unfettered by the snare of flattery and indulgence of his 'noble' patrons.
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Postby thenewaustria » Thu Jul 15, 2004 12:34 am

"not all written history is authentic"----- Pierione
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Peace To France

Postby MonroeDoctrine » Thu Jul 15, 2004 7:06 am

Peace to the efforts of LaFayette, and Lazare Carnot:

VIVE LA FRANCE!
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Vive Les Revolutionaire!

Postby MonroeDoctrine » Thu Jul 15, 2004 7:07 am

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