Page 1 of 1

Why is Keats considered great?

PostPosted: Wed Apr 02, 2003 12:38 am
by Joe
Why is Keats considered a great poet? I'm doing an essay on him... any thoughts?

PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2003 8:21 pm
by Endymion
It depends on who you ask.

I consider him great because of the frailty of his life as well as the majesty of his words and the flow of his poems. Keats is widely respected as a genius, and when you see this genius transferred into his poems and letters there is much more brilliance than his twenty-six years would have ordinarily allowed.

That is just my opinion, you won't get many marks on just this one answer, but you are asking the right people.

PostPosted: Mon Apr 07, 2003 1:04 pm
by Claire
You mustn't get 'great' and 'popular' confused...try comparing him to an experienced poetwriter (who writes about how he/she feels about a subject ) (Wilfred Owen.) and/or a popular poet (Tennyson) (who wrote pretty easily read words with easy rhythms) (sounds like a pop song!!!!!)

I feel Keats was heartfelt and Tennyson just wrote pretty words!
I personally think keats is/was considered great by the fact that his words, in the end, are and always will be, true.
:)

Keats touched the peaceful dominion of beauty's easy rest...

PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2003 4:37 pm
by jamiano
John Keats is the lyrical prince.John Keats'words swiftly exit the pilgrim heart from the temporal depth of sorrow, into the peacful dominion of beauty's easy rest.
Keatic poetic majesty exits throughout all the skillful tapestries of his pure tendered sensations.Each work of John Keats is a revealation of style and humbled grace. Poets embrace John Keats for his artistic honesty,his true dedication and faithful declaration to the realm of poesy.

A sample of his genuis has touched and fostered legions of artists.

jamiano

below is an excerpt from, "To my Brother George"


To my Brother George

Full joy I feel, while I thus cleave the air,
That my soft verse will charm thy daughters fair,
and warm thy sons!- Ah, my dear friend and brother,
Could I ,at once, my mad ambition smother,
For tasting joys like these, sure I should be
Happier, and dearer to society.

John Keats

PostPosted: Sun Sep 21, 2003 10:10 am
by Princess
Claire wrote:You mustn't get 'great' and 'popular' confused...try comparing him to an experienced poetwriter (who writes about how he/she feels about a subject ) (Wilfred Owen.) and/or a popular poet (Tennyson) (who wrote pretty easily read words with easy rhythms) (sounds like a pop song!!!!!)

I feel Keats was heartfelt and Tennyson just wrote pretty words!
I personally think keats is/was considered great by the fact that his words, in the end, are and always will be, true.
:)


:D :) :lol: Excellent response...i had an essay to do too, and ur answer really helped, THANX! :wink: :cry: :roll: :lol:

Re: Keats touched the peaceful dominion of beauty's easy res

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:24 pm
by jamiano
jamiano wrote:John Keats is the lyrical prince.John Keats'words swiftly exit the pilgrim heart from the temporal depth of sorrow, into the peacful dominion of beauty's easy rest.
Keatic poetic majesty exits throughout all the skillful tapestries of his pure tendered sensations.Each work of John Keats is a revealation of style and humbled grace. Poets embrace John Keats for his artistic honesty,his true dedication and faithful declaration to the realm of poesy.

A sample of his genuis has touched and fostered legions of artists.

jamiano

below is an excerpt from, "To my Brother George"


To my Brother George

Full joy I feel, while I thus cleave the air,
That my soft verse will charm thy daughters fair,
and warm thy sons!- Ah, my dear friend and brother,
Could I ,at once, my mad ambition smother,
For tasting joys like these, sure I should be
Happier, and dearer to society.

John Keats
:D :D :D

PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2005 12:14 pm
by witch6
I believe Keats's greatness lies in his ability to understand sorrow. His exploration of pain in both his poems and letters shows an incredible understanding of what it is to be a man among men, a suffering individual among suffering individuals. He writes that a poet is one who feels the pain of humanity as if it were his own and God knows he knew about pain. He writes about the usefullness of pain, he says that no human being is complete and fully adult unless he's felt the pain and lived through it, learned from it.

And despite all of this, Keats still manages to celebrate life and nature and beauty and his enthusiasm for all things living.

No matter how many times I read his works, the co-existence of his love for life and deep understanding of sorrow always surprises me.

I hope that helped.

Why Keats is great?

PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2005 6:24 pm
by MonroeDoctrine
Keats is not a poet of sorrow hence launch that axiom into the Orion nebula id est as far away from the mind as possible!
Keats is a Platonic Philosopher, and a Republican (Not Bush Republican) due to Leigh Hunt and Shelly's influence. And the American Revolution's effect on the globe.

In his letters it is obvious that he read the great classics and loved them: Dante, Plato, Milton, Shakespear and Homer. His ideas clearly express something beautiful because he understood a principle of living in history despite his mortal weaknesses. He had respect for those who came before him, that's probably why he even wrote a poem to Robert Burns!

If you want to understand Keats Ode on A Grecian Urn says it all!
Come to know that BEAUTY IS TRUTH AND TRUTH IS BEAUTY! If there is one message Keats left 't was that truthful and beautiful phrase.

PostPosted: Mon Apr 11, 2005 12:25 pm
by Becky
But what is beauty? And what is truth? Did he answer that? I'm pretty sure he asked it though.

PostPosted: Tue Apr 12, 2005 9:23 pm
by Steen
I study philosophy i'm used to such silly qustions such as "what is truth" I didn't think he expected us to anwser that...it was probley so clear to him what the anwser was that he took it for read that we would as well!!!!