Your Favorite Lines from Keats

Discussion on the works of John Keats.

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Postby dks » Thu Jun 29, 2006 2:20 pm

No, perhaps not, Credo...but you just encapsulated the context and themes of Fitzgerald's works. In fact, what you have said is so relevant to my summer class, that it may help some of the students in there understand the style and substance of his writing a little better...

the last class is tonight--we are going over what will be on the final, which is next Thursday.

Credo, may I quote you? May I print what you've said here and take it to class tonight and read it aloud? It's very relevant and helpful.

:|
"I am certain of nothing but the holiness of the heart's affections and the Truth of Imagination."
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Postby Saturn » Thu Jun 29, 2006 9:19 pm

dks wrote:
Ahhh, yes!! Thank you, to the lovely Credo for the superbly gorgeous quote from Scottie--he is, after all, the novelist equivalent to our man. Of this, I am certain. :shock:


I wouldn't quite go that far...

Since I've only read Gatsby I can't really say if his other work measures up to such praise.
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Postby Credo Buffa » Thu Jun 29, 2006 11:03 pm

Saturn wrote:Since I've only read Gatsby I can't really say if his other work measures up to such praise.

He's an all-around exquisite writer, Saturn. You should see if you can find any of his short stories online.

dks wrote:Credo, may I quote you? May I print what you've said here and take it to class tonight and read it aloud? It's very relevant and helpful.

Uh. . . yeah, go for it. Kind of bizarre thinking that some random thing I wrote on the Keats forum (not about Keats even!) might be relevant in a classroom discussion 1,000 miles south of here, but if you think it'll help. . . :shock:
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Postby jamiano » Wed Sep 27, 2006 4:16 pm

Hello dear friends,



Often, when I limit the a scope of a passion, the dreamy realm of poetry, I discover anew the lyrical genuis of John Keats.

For example, as a season drifts of nature's spell for new wonders, "The Eve of St. Agnes" raptures the spirit of fantasy; a joy for the senses...

Her eyes were open, but she still beheld,

Now wide awake, the vision of her sleep:

John Keats







peace to love,

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Keats Quotes

Postby wildechild76 » Wed Dec 13, 2006 6:27 pm

Of course I will preface it with the usual 'if i had to choose' bit:

"...That any Daniel tho' he be a sot
Can make the lying lips turn pale of hue
by belching out 'ye are that head of Gold"
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Postby Kaki » Thu Dec 14, 2006 1:53 am

Short but for some reason I like these the best:

"And for her eyes: what could such eyes do there
But weep, and weep, that they were born so fair? "
& later,
"Her eyes in torture fix’d, and anguish drear,
Hot, glaz’d, and wide, with lid-lashes all sear,
Flash’d phosphor and sharp sparks, without one cooling tear."

Again don't ask why, it just appeals to me on some subconscious level I don't fully understand.

Well, that's my both of my pennies.
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Postby Malia » Mon Dec 18, 2006 7:57 pm

This is not a line of Keats's, but it is so closely connected with Keats and so extremely moving, that I thought I'd post it. I may have done so already. . .I'm getting a weird sense of deja vu about all of my posts this morning!

The line is from a letter written by Joseph Severn to, I believe, William Haslam on Feb. 22nd 1821--the day before Keats died. He speaks of staying close by Keats's side during these final hours and writes:

"Keats keeps me by him and shadows out the form of one solitary friend."

Coming from someone who was not at all literary, that is one of the most simply profound statements I've ever read.
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Postby Saturn » Mon Dec 18, 2006 11:03 pm

Malia wrote:
"Keats keeps me by him and shadows out the form of one solitary friend."

Coming from someone who was not at all literary, that is one of the most simply profound statements I've ever read.


I don't remember reading that before Malia, don't worry you are not repeating yourself this time.

It is a wonderful turn of phrase indeed.

"...shadows out..."
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
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Postby dks » Thu Dec 21, 2006 6:44 am

Malia wrote:This is not a line of Keats's, but it is so closely connected with Keats and so extremely moving, that I thought I'd post it. I may have done so already. . .I'm getting a weird sense of deja vu about all of my posts this morning!


You know why you felt that on that day, Miss Malia? Because you posted that on my birthday--that's why. :wink:
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Favorite lines of Keats

Postby bard of passion » Thu Jan 18, 2007 7:16 am

Conspiring with him how to load and bless
With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eaves run;
. . . .
And still more, later flowers for the bees,
Until they think warm days will never cease,
For summer has o'erbrimmed their clammy cells.
( To Autumn )

At his best, Keats matched and moved beyond Shakespeare in combining the best of the old (Anglo-Saxon) vocabulary with the new (Norman French and Latinate)
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Postby Saturn » Thu Jan 18, 2007 10:54 am

Welcome bard of passion :D
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Postby dks » Thu Jan 18, 2007 7:31 pm

Here, here...yes, welcome B of P...I, too, have always loved that beautiful parallelism of his in To Autumn--load and bless.
"I am certain of nothing but the holiness of the heart's affections and the Truth of Imagination."
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Postby bard of passion » Thu Jan 18, 2007 8:17 pm

thank you Saturn and dks: Keats is the cornerstone of my late teen years, when I discovered poetry and a specific girl. Poor thing, she still thinks my early poems to her are the best!

I always (prior to reading this in college) knew as I read more in British literature that Keats was carrying the torch of Shakespeare and ilk into the Romantic period.

I always wondered what would have happened if he lived beyond his second decade. A convert to Catholicism (the strain was always there), marriage to an earthy Italian woman (goodbye to Fanny!) and more attempts at verse dramas and odes.

Oh well. Idyllic speculation but his brother joined with Audubon in America so the pioneering genes ran deep in the Keatsian lineage!
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Postby Malia » Thu Jan 18, 2007 8:47 pm

Interesting thoughts, Bard of Passion and yes, welcome to the forum!! :) I am a little confused and curious about your comment about Keats and Catholicism. What makes you think, had he lived longer, he might have converted? What is this "strain" of which you speak?
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Postby bard of passion » Thu Jan 18, 2007 9:13 pm

Malia,

Well, maybe not a conversion but a style developing
towards a Catholic sensibility.

He was republican in his views, was he not? And although misplaced (French) and nascent (Italian and Greek-Eastern Church) republicanism was in the air, Keats (from what I read in his letters) didn't care much for the Lords and Oxonians of his day.

Heck, George lit out for the wilderness of America. Keats (with a little prodding from Brown, grant you) looked to playwrighting as the next step in art and income.

It seems that Catholic countries around the Mediterranean of the early 19th century were the havens for artists escaping the goofiness of Transcendentalism (Emerson, the poet primarily) and Determinism (a la Arnold).

It was the Left Bank of the late Regency period.
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