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PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2006 9:28 pm
by Saturn
If you check your e-mail later you may find something to start your "education" with :wink:

PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2006 11:47 pm
by Credo Buffa
I have a brilliant recording of Chopin's waltzes by Dinu Lipati that is probably my favorite bit of musical accompaniment for reading. Usually I don't like having background noise when I'm reading, but this one is an exception. :D

I think there's something about reading 19th century literature while listening to 19th century piano music that transports you into that world. Perhaps it's the fact that this music would be what people would be most likely to have in their homes when they were reading the same novels or poems. :)

PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2006 11:52 pm
by Saturn
Credo Buffa wrote:
I think there's something about reading 19th century literature while listening to 19th century piano music that transports you into that world. Perhaps it's the fact that this music would be what people would be most likely to have in their homes when they were reading the same novels or poems. :)


I thought this was just me - Credo, great minds do think alike.

I thought I was weird in doing that.

Reading romantic poetry and listening to Classical/romantic era composers is an audio/visual feast :shock: :D

PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2006 12:20 am
by Nightingale27
If you check your e-mail later you may find something to start your "education" with


I can also email some classical music to anyone interested. I made a playlist for myself of some of my favorite classical pieces. I have pieces by Chopin, Vivaldi, Hayden, Tchikovsky, Listz, Bach, Pachelbel, Mendelssohn, Beethoven, Brahms, and Scubert. I'm kind of disappointed that I don't have any Mozart. :( Most of it is piano...it's my favorite instrument.

I think there's something about reading 19th century literature while listening to 19th century piano music that transports you into that world.

I totally agree! I love 19th century classical piano!

PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2006 12:36 am
by Credo Buffa
Nightingale27 wrote:I'm kind of disappointed that I don't have any Mozart. :(

asdflkjsdflkj;asdlfkjsdfkljsdf!!!! No Mozart?! :shock:

Must get some Mozart! No lover of Keats should be without!

PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2006 12:40 am
by Nightingale27
Oh, don't get me wrong. I LOVE Mozart. I just don't own a CD so I couldn't put his compositions on my playlist. :( I'm going to have to fix that. I listen to Mozart reguarly on the radio though! And I have some Mozart sheet music that I can play rather poorly. :?

I am absolutely in love with his opera the Marriage of Figaro. I'm not usually a big opera fan, but I really like this one. I also like Carmen by Bizet. Can't listen to it when I read Keats though. In fact any music with lyrics or vocals distracts me when I read.

PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2006 2:59 am
by Credo Buffa
If you want a really good collection of Mozart all in one go, I'd recommend the complete soundtrack to Amadeus. It includes selections from some of his greatest works, and the performances are spectacular (which is only natural coming from Neville Marriner and the Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields; my personal favorite conductor/ensemble combination for Mozart).

PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2006 4:53 am
by dks
I agree. You almost have to have Mozart and Bach in any collection--if not for emotional reasons, then for their sheer technical, musical genius... :shock:

PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2006 10:05 am
by Saturn
Bach's Goldberg Variations and The Art of Fugue are essentials for piano lovers. :D

PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2006 10:23 am
by Tina
Beethoven' s 9 th and Placebo :D
And with Depeche Mode :D

PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2006 12:23 pm
by soumya
To me Mozart and Bach are very Keats....
i even find to discover him while playing or listning to violin.... ofcourse a melancolic tune.... :)

PostPosted: Thu Jul 13, 2006 12:10 am
by Credo Buffa
I have an odd relationship with Bach. I love to play Bach on the flute; it's like you can feel his mind working and the meticulous construction when you play. But as for listening to Bach. . . :? I can't say that I don't like it, but I definitely don't have the response I do to most other composers.

However, I love listening to Bach as realized by Bela Fleck on banjo. Give me a piece by Bach for its original instrumentation, and I shrug. Give me that same piece with Bela Fleck playing it, and I'm there. :D

Is that weird or what?

PostPosted: Thu Jul 13, 2006 4:51 am
by dks
No. Not weird at all. That's what I meant by realizing their genius--no matter through what channel. I don't have the same otherworldly, out of body experience listening to Bach like I do when I listen to Beethoven, either...but his sheer, technical talent... :shock:

It's sort of like hearing Carole King sing "Natural Woman," which she wrote..then hearing Miss Aretha Franklin sing it--no comparison--and the damn song belongs to Carole King, mind you! :shock: :lol:

PostPosted: Thu Jul 13, 2006 5:07 am
by Nightingale27
I love to play Bach on the flute; it's like you can feel his mind working and the meticulous construction when you play. But as for listening to Bach. . .


The same thing happens to me on the piano! I love playing Bach's pieces because you can really get into the pattern of the notes. The pieces that I have played are almost mathematical. When you analyze you can appreciate his genius.

PostPosted: Thu Jul 13, 2006 12:45 pm
by Saturn
The thing about those baroque composers like Bach and Handel and Vivaldi is the melancholy about the music.

I don't know what it is but it just makes me feel really sad - its so hauntingly beauitful.

The Goldberg variations get me too. There is a sophistication, a preciseness yet a simple beauty about them which just affects me in ways I can't explain.

Bach's church music, particularly his St. Matthew's Passion is particularly moving.