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beauty is truth,truth beauty

PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2003 11:02 pm
by leanne
In the line 'Beauty is truth, truth beauty,' is Keats arguing that art (beauty) reflects something of reality-the truth, but this reality however is far more 'beautiful' in the sense that humans can experience and fulfil their heart's desires, unlike the 'bold lover, who never,never canst thou kiss' who, like the other figures in art, is in a moment of anticipation which won't be fulfilled. Have I interpreted this right?

PostPosted: Fri May 30, 2003 4:01 pm
by JustMe
I read in a commentary that he's just acknowledging that real life seems somewhat richer than cold art - but the truth/beauty line signifies that he admits art is better than life, because art is eternal.

As for what I think...I'm not sure. I think he expressing both. Perhaps that life is in fact better, but it cannot last, whereas art can, and so, though colder, it has eventually the advantage.

truth is beauty... contradiction?

PostPosted: Sat May 31, 2003 9:39 pm
by Guest
I'm not sure about this quote. It is obvious that Keats values beauty and a life of nature and feelings rather than logic and philosophy (lamia.... etc where their love is destroyed by things of the outside world). The TRUTH about lamia is that she is a snake and has been deceiving Lycius. however, she does this from a pure wish to be there an be in bliss - there is no harm and it is evident keats totally agrees. Anyway, the TRUTH of this causes BEAUTY to be destroyed. why is this?

lamia

PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2003 11:08 pm
by Guest
In response to the Truth and Beauty of Lamia, isn't it that Lamia comes to represent beauty in the sense of poetry,passion whilst Appolonius represents truth-the cold philosophy. Therefore it is the truth from the outside, (Lamia's unwanted guest at the banquet) which destroys the beauty to expose the truth.

PostPosted: Tue Aug 12, 2003 2:00 am
by Lord Byron
In fact, no one has ever figured out whether 'truth is beauty' is what Keats is saying, or what the urn is telling him. If the latter, it is possible that Keats does not entirely believe this idea himself.

PostPosted: Sun Sep 21, 2003 8:36 am
by Guest
:wink: :roll: :oops: :cry: :lol: :o [quote][/quote]In fact, no one has ever figured out whether 'truth is beauty' is what Keats is saying, or what the urn is telling him. If the latter, it is possible that Keats does not entirely believe this idea himself.

PostPosted: Wed Oct 01, 2003 1:11 pm
by Guest
In fact it may be Keats talking to the urn: "Beauty is truth, truth beauty" is all that the figures on the urn know, and all that they (being only creations of art) will ever need to know.

(The figures, being creations of artistic beauty, have their entire existence -- truth -- in that beauty; their truth, their reality is their art. And that is all they can ever possess)

PostPosted: Mon Mar 01, 2004 6:38 pm
by Guest
errr.......