Facsimile Editions of Keats

Discussion on the works of John Keats.

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Re: Facsimile Editions of Keats

Postby Malia » Tue Feb 16, 2010 6:17 pm

Raphael wrote:Wow yes! No wonder he got many dinner invitations too- he was truly magical. Wouldn't you want him at your table? :wink:


That statement gets me to thinking of that old game: If you could invite 5 people to dinner, who would they be and why? (With the rules I've used for this game, these people can be living or dead and come from any era.)

I sometimes think about that (while doing something mundane, like the dishes--it does make time pass more swiftly :wink: ). While my guest list shifts to a degree, I would like to have people over who are engaging and can tell a good story. I'd have Keats (of course), Alan Alda (great story teller and interested in a lot of different things), maybe Charlotte Bronte . . . oh, Sr. Joan Chittister--she is a feminist nun who rocks my world and would, I think, show people that there is a type Christianity that is not "parsonic" or closed-minded. And, just for some real fun, Oscar Wilde. Pretty crazy combination, actually. But the stories! I wonder what I'd serve for dinner. . .
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Re: Facsimile Editions of Keats

Postby Raphael » Wed Feb 17, 2010 6:43 pm

That statement gets me to thinking of that old game: If you could invite 5 people to dinner, who would they be and why? (With the rules I've used for this game, these people can be living or dead and come from any era.) While my guest list shifts to a degree, I would like to have people over who are engaging and can tell a good story. I'd have Keats (of course), Alan Alda (great story teller and interested in a lot of different things), maybe Charlotte Bronte . . .


I like the Bronte sisters very much- I have been to their house- it is a museum now, like Keats House. I have seen their tiny shoes and dresses ( they were well under five feet tall).


oh, Sr. Joan Chittister--she is a feminist nun who rocks my world and would, I think, show people that there is a type Christianity that is not "parsonic" or closed-minded.



I looked her up on wikipedia- she works for women's rights it says- I wonder how she feels about the Catholic faith not permitting women clergy? She seems interesting. I like Francis of Assisi- he was interesting and also a vegeterian- unusual for those times!


And, just for some real fun, Oscar Wilde. Pretty crazy combination, actually. But the stories! I wonder what I'd serve for dinner. . .


Yes- Oscar has to come! :D

I would invite him and Junkets ( goes without saying), George Harrison, The Bronte Sisters, The Shelleys, JRR Tolkein, DG Rossetti, Christina Rossetti. More than five I know! I would serve nut roast, roast spuds, lots of roasted vegetables, plum cake and ice cream. Claret to drink of course, and homemade lemonade. cheese and biscuits and fruit. If I could get someone to cook roast beef for Junkets that would be a help lol.
Last edited by Raphael on Thu Feb 18, 2010 5:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Facsimile Editions of Keats

Postby Cybele » Thu Feb 18, 2010 2:56 am

Raphael & Malia --
So many of those letters are around thanks to his friends who saved them. And they were saved because they were such good letters. I, for one, am *very grateful* to those friends for having preserved those precious papers.

And indeed, it is the letters that make the poet so very real. -- We get to see him as a down-to-earth guy, concerned with many of the same things we are. We get to see his kindness, his humor, his periods of grumpiness. We get to see why his friends were so devoted to him.

We discover Keats through the poetry and become true devotees through the letters.
"The philosopher proves that the philosopher exists. The poet merely enjoys existence."
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Re: Facsimile Editions of Keats

Postby Raphael » Thu Feb 18, 2010 5:13 pm

Raphael & Malia --
So many of those letters are around thanks to his friends who saved them. And they were saved because they were such good letters. I, for one, am *very grateful* to those friends for having preserved those precious papers.



I am grateful too- his letters must have been very precious to them to keep them all those years after he had gone.


And indeed, it is the letters that make the poet so very real. -- We get to see him as a down-to-earth guy, concerned with many of the same things we are.


Yes- I can certainly identify with some of his worries- although he is in a different century to myself- some of the problems he faced are still a problem today here in Britain. Of course, though I cannot truly know what his suffering from consumption was like (as I have been immunised and have relatively good health) I can care about his pain.



We get to see his kindness, his humor, his periods of grumpiness. We get to see why his friends were so devoted to him.


Yes- it kind of feels like an honour (for me) to read his letters and get a window into his world and life.

We discover Keats through the poetry and become true devotees through the letters.


Oh- so true!

p.s Have you thought what you would serve for dinner Malia?
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: Facsimile Editions of Keats

Postby Malia » Thu Feb 18, 2010 6:05 pm

I definitely became a devotee through Keats's letters--and his biographies. I somewhat shamefully admit that it has been a while since I delved deeply into his poems. Although I enjoy analyzing them when I do "delve". Keats's poetical philosophy and depth of thought speak to me, although I must admit there are times when his poetical style does not speak to me (especially his early works when he seems so eager to rhyme everything with an "ee" sound--even going so far as to create words like "bluey" :roll: I think Keats had an "ee" fetish; didn't he say the Devonshire girls had the prettiest "ee's" in the language? :wink: )

As far as what I would serve at my "immortal dinner," I think I would go with Cornish game hens, roast potatoes, a good salad (hopefully those from the earlier 19th c. would be OK eating raw veggies), some fresh homemade rolls and for dessert--Victoria sponge with a good cup of tea.
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Re: Facsimile Editions of Keats

Postby Raphael » Thu Feb 18, 2010 6:39 pm

I somewhat shamefully admit that it has been a while since I delved deeply into his poems.


Malia!!! :o tut tut....


Although I enjoy analyzing them when I do "delve".


I prefer being swept along by the sensations, descriptions, rthym and images- I care not for much analysis.. :wink:


Keats's poetical philosophy and depth of thought speak to me, although I must admit there are times when his poetical style does not speak to me (especially his early works when he seems so eager to rhyme everything with an "ee" sound--even going so far as to create words like "bluey" :roll: I think Keats had an "ee" fetish; didn't he say the Devonshire girls had the prettiest "ee's" in the language? :wink: )


I suppose it was one of his quirks! :D


As far as what I would serve at my "immortal dinner," I think I would go with Cornish game hens, roast potatoes, a good salad (hopefully those from the earlier 19th c. would be OK eating raw veggies), some fresh homemade rolls and for dessert--Victoria sponge with a good cup of tea.


What no claret?! I forgot the tea and coffee! Junkets liked coffee.
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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