Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Join in the discussion of the 2009 film Bright Star.

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Re: Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Postby Cybele » Mon May 10, 2010 1:16 am

Raphael wrote:
Saturn wrote:That scene was particularly well done, the physical shock of it and the surprise of it was very well executed.


Agreed. I love the way Fanny shows such love and concern in this. The only thing that didn't sit right was Mrs Brawne's hesitation to let him stay- we know that it was Mrs Brawne who answered his knock on the door and insisted he stay.Mrs Brawne loved him like her own son and he loved her like a mother- they were much closer than the film shows.


At first I didn't care for that scene. I a) knew that that's not how things really happened; and b) I doubted that Keats would have crawled under shrubbery like a sick puppy.

Then, I realized how well that scene worked as a metaphor. Keats was in a horrible place emotionally, financially, physically and -- when you come right down to it -- homeless on top of it all. The incident (not dealt with in the movie) with the Hunts' maid, added to an unsuccessful attempt to get well in a raucous household, is all wrapped up neatly in that scene, expressing J.K.'s desperation without distracting the audience with a bunch of details that would have detracted from the story.
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Re: Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Postby Raphael » Mon May 10, 2010 1:57 am

Then, I realized how well that scene worked as a metaphor. Keats was in a horrible place emotionally, financially, physically and -- when you come right down to it -- homeless on top of it all.


It was so sad that Brown had to rent out their half of Wentworth Place- I often wonder if Fanny had asked Mrs Brawne if he could stay with them, but maybe not as Hunt might have already offered to get him the room by then (it was because John's landlady was worried as he had another severe haemorrhage and was too ill to be on his own that he was taken in by Hunt).



The incident (not dealt with in the movie) with the Hunts' maid, added to an unsuccessful attempt to get well in a raucous household, is all wrapped up neatly in that scene, expressing J.K.'s desperation without distracting the audience with a bunch of details that would have detracted from the story.


I follow you, but it could have been included- it would have been a short scene in which he gets given the letter opened, sobs and leaves, goes up to Well Walk, then realises he cannot face going back to his old room that he had shared with Tom and instead goes to the Brawnes' house. I wish it had been arranged he stay with them from the start- it would have meant less emotional and physical suffering.
Regarding Italy- I'm still in two minds about that- it was a horrible journey and he was so depressed being there in that tiny room away from Fanny and the Brawnes, but would it have been worse for him dying in front of Fanny? It would have been heartbreaking for both of them. Fanny realised that he had agreed to go in the end to save her from watching him pass on- she wrote this to his sister. She said it was a "kindness" to her that he went. I think he was exceedingly brave to make the desicion to go. Even in his despair and great illness he thought of others- I admire that in him- he was so selfless.
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Postby BrokenLyre » Thu May 27, 2010 6:13 pm

Little change of subject if I may...

Yesterday, a friend of mine returned from Italy - and yes he went to the Keats-Shelley museum, saw the rooms, and also went to the Keats grave site. He took pictures, and yes I was happy for him and somewhat jealous....He is not a fan of Keats, but he did this for me. While he is showing these pictures to a small group of us, an 18 year old girl from Turkey, named A.J., really got excited. She told me shortly after the slide show that she is an International Student, and though English is her second language, she loves John Keats! She went on and on about how lovely his words were, how terrific his poems are, how wonderful the movie Bright Star was. I was just amazed as we sat there, away from the rest of the group, talking about what we value about John Keats. Just the two of us talking over Keats' poems made me feel like we were two little kids who just found a treasure map and were all excited about.

So, out of the blue, I run into a young High School International Student from Turkey, who just happens to think John Keats is the most wonderful poet around. Her giddiness made me smile as she told me what his poetry means to her and how she just loves the man. And she loved the movie! What a delight.

I plan on seeing her again, and giving her some direction as to books to read on Keats. I look forward to giving her a copy of my own books.

Just a little happiness to share with you all.
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Re: Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Postby Malia » Thu May 27, 2010 6:42 pm

Hi Broken Lyre! Haven't really seen you around the boards lately, so it is great to hear from you again :) I know what you mean about finding a Keats friend to chat with. It is a heady experience, especially considering it can be so *rare* to find another Keatsian for conversation. I used to force people to listen to me enthuse about Keats and get slightly uncomfortable smiles and blank stares in return :lol: Over the years, I've learned to curb my enthusiasm a little bit. So, it is a wonderful treat to actually be able to chat with someone who completely understands the passionate love we Keatsians possess for our poet! The big reason I enjoy this forum is that every time I interact with you all, I remember I'm not alone in my Keats-love.
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Re: Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Postby Raphael » Thu May 27, 2010 10:15 pm

Yesterday, a friend of mine returned from Italy - and yes he went to the Keats-Shelley museum, saw the rooms, and also went to the Keats grave site. He took pictures, and yes I was happy for him and somewhat jealous....He is not a fan of Keats, but he did this for me.


What a good friend!

While he is showing these pictures to a small group of us, an 18 year old girl from Turkey, named A.J., really got excited. She told me shortly after the slide show that she is an International Student, and though English is her second language, she loves John Keats! She went on and on about how lovely his words were, how terrific his poems are, how wonderful the movie Bright Star was. I was just amazed as we sat there, away from the rest of the group, talking about what we value about John Keats. Just the two of us talking over Keats' poems made me feel like we were two little kids who just found a treasure map and were all excited about.



That is so heart warming! She is clearly a young lady of excellent taste!



So, out of the blue, I run into a young High School International Student from Turkey, who just happens to think John Keats is the most wonderful poet around. Her giddiness made me smile as she told me what his poetry means to her and how she just loves the man. And she loved the movie! What a delight.



She is right - he is "the most wonderful poet around.." :D


I plan on seeing her again, and giving her some direction as to books to read on Keats. I look forward to giving her a copy of my own books.Just a little happiness to share with you all.


How nice Broken Lyre- thanks for sharing this with us.
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Postby Raphael » Thu May 27, 2010 10:18 pm

Malia wrote:Hi Broken Lyre! Haven't really seen you around the boards lately, so it is great to hear from you again :) I know what you mean about finding a Keats friend to chat with. It is a heady experience, especially considering it can be so *rare* to find another Keatsian for conversation. I used to force people to listen to me enthuse about Keats and get slightly uncomfortable smiles and blank stares in return :lol: Over the years, I've learned to curb my enthusiasm a little bit. So, it is a wonderful treat to actually be able to chat with someone who completely understands the passionate love we Keatsians possess for our poet! The big reason I enjoy this forum is that every time I interact with you all, I remember I'm not alone in my Keats-love.


I sceond all of that Malia- it's great to read a new post from Broken Lyre, it's rare to find another Keatsian to have a face to face conversation with and this forum is a way to share our passion for dear Junkets! I hope one day I'll find a Keatsian friend in my home town.
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Postby harvest » Mon May 31, 2010 3:20 am

i'd love to be able to have someone local to talk to about keats.
Now a soft kiss - Aye, by that kiss, I vow an endless bliss. ~ j. keats
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Re: Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Postby Raphael » Mon May 31, 2010 3:30 am

It's a shame none of us on here live near each other! I hope you find a Keatsian friend in your area one day harvest!
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

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Re: Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Postby Ennis » Tue Jun 01, 2010 8:44 pm

Hi, everyone!! I'm so glad to finally be able to log on to this forum!! It seems as though I've been trying to for years now. I so love Keats and his poetry, and to be able to "talk" to those who feel the same as I do is an inexplicable thrill to me. I, too, feel as though others (including my 12 year old students) just "grin and bear" me. But, frankly, I don't care. Once Keats gets under one's skin it's very difficult to dislodge him (and who would want to, anyway!!??), and he's been under mine for 45 years now! As pitiful as it may sound, I want a "Keats" friend (or two, or three, or . . .), as well.
God, I was born in the wrong time. . .
"But if you will fully love me, though there may be some fire, 'twill not be more than we can bear when moistened and bedewed with Pleasures." JK to FB 08.07.1819
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Re: Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Postby Raphael » Tue Jun 01, 2010 10:36 pm

Ennis wrote:Hi, everyone!! I'm so glad to finally be able to log on to this forum!! It seems as though I've been trying to for years now. I so love Keats and his poetry, and to be able to "talk" to those who feel the same as I do is an inexplicable thrill to me. I, too, feel as though others (including my 12 year old students) just "grin and bear" me. But, frankly, I don't care. Once Keats gets under one's skin it's very difficult to dislodge him (and who would want to, anyway!!??), and he's been under mine for 45 years now! As pitiful as it may sound, I want a "Keats" friend (or two, or three, or . . .), as well.
God, I was born in the wrong time. . .


I know how you feel Ennis! It's nice to have you here- I look forward to Keatsian discussions with you! Do you teach literature in a school then?
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Postby Cybele » Tue Jun 01, 2010 10:39 pm

Welcome, Ennis. Glad you're here. I was delighted to find this forum as well.
It's wonderful to discover all those who spend lots of time pondering Keats-ish things just like you.
Last edited by Cybele on Wed Jun 02, 2010 10:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Postby BrokenLyre » Wed Jun 02, 2010 5:53 am

Good to hear from you Malia, Raphael, Cybele, harvest and Ennis too. I miss this Forum. I have read some things but couldn't get the time to respond. Jobs and family have swallowed me up and I hope to be more free in a few weeks.

And if that weren't enough, 10 days ago, I was visiting a friend of mine for a short visit. Two days after we spoke, he had a crash on his bicycle and is now a quadriplegic on a ventilator. Stunning. I couldn't help but think of this:

"Circumstances are like clouds continually gathering and bursting. While we are laughing, the seed of some trouble is put into the wide arable land of events. While we are laughing, it sprouts, it grows, and suddenly bears a poison fruit which we must pluck."

How true. ...... Anyway, I got a better sense of the fragility and transient nature of life. I appreciate you my Keats friends.
"Come... dry your eyes, for you are life, rarer than a quark and unpredictable beyond the dreams of Heisenberg; the clay in which the forces that shape all things leave their fingerprints most clearly. Dry your eyes... and let's go home."
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Re: Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Postby Ennis » Wed Jun 02, 2010 1:50 pm

Raphael,

I do teach literature, or try to!, to 8th grade middle schoolers who will have heard of, as well as studied Keats (at least a few of his "easier" poems), before they are seniors in high school (that's when our students here in North Carolina are introduced to British literature)! Actually, my original plan (back "in the day") wasn't to teach. I made the mistake of majoring in my first, and only, love: Brit lit. and the English department at the university I attended required English majors to "specialize" in a specific area. Since my obsession with all things Keats had already begun years before (at the tender age of 12 -- and it WAS a tender age in 1967!!), I naturally I chose the Romantic period, with a focus on Keats's poetry. Obviously, my job prospects were somewhat limited upon graduation. Who cares about a British lit major who knew something of Keats, the man, the poet, and the writer of the most remarkable letters!?! ("Keats? Who's that, and how can HE be of any use in THIS job. . . .?!").
Anyway, enough of that. It's great to finally be here . . . just think: our own "little" version of a 21st century (Gosh, THAT sounds awful!! 21st century. . . !) Keats Circle. Now, if we could only find Keats. . . With, of course, the guarantee (to him) that he would never become "a pet lamb in a sentimental farce."
"But if you will fully love me, though there may be some fire, 'twill not be more than we can bear when moistened and bedewed with Pleasures." JK to FB 08.07.1819
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Re: Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Postby Raphael » Wed Jun 02, 2010 3:12 pm

BrokenLyre wrote:Good to hear from you Malia, Raphael, Cybele, harvest and Ennis too. I miss this Forum. I have read some things but couldn't get the time to respond. Jobs and family have swallowed me up and I hope to be more free in a few weeks.

And if that weren't enough, 10 days ago, I was visiting a friend of mine for a short visit. Two days after we spoke, he had a crash on his bicycle and is now a quadriplegic on a ventilator. Stunning. I couldn't help but think of this:

"Circumstances are like clouds continually gathering and bursting. While we are laughing, the seed of some trouble is put into the wide arable land of events. While we are laughing, it sprouts, it grows, and suddenly bears a poison fruit which we must pluck."

How true. ...... Anyway, I got a better sense of the fragility and transient nature of life. I appreciate you my Keats friends.


Good to hear from you Broken Lyre- missed you on the forum. I'm so sorry to hear about your friend, how awful. I hope he recovers. My heart goes out to him.It puts my suffering with eczema in perspective. My neighbour was found dead in his room last week, life is indeed fragile. I'm trying to take nothing for granted. A Jay just landed on my window a few minutes ago- I had the honour of seeing him quite close up, taking a piece of organic bread I had put out for the feathered ones.He is a beautiful creature.I've seen him and his mate flying around outside.

Best wishes
Raphael. x
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

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Re: Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Postby Raphael » Wed Jun 02, 2010 3:22 pm

Since my obsession with all things Keats had already begun years before (at the tender age of 12 -- and it WAS a tender age in 1967!!), I naturally I chose the Romantic period, with a focus on Keats's poetry. Obviously, my job prospects were somewhat limited upon graduation. Who cares about a British lit major who knew something of Keats, the man, the poet, and the writer of the most remarkable letters!?! ("Keats? Who's that, and how can HE be of any use in THIS job. . . .?!").



That's wonderful Ennis! I'm so glad that you are able to make a living which involves sharing your love of Junkets!
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

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