Tom Keats

The life of John Keats the man: his family, his friends, and his contemporaries.

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Tom Keats

Postby Ennis » Wed Dec 01, 2010 4:27 am

Thomas Keats
01st December 1818
8.30 AM
19 years, one month

"I have been everywhere."

JKeats
after 07th December 1818
comment on kind distractions provided by friends following Tom's funeral
"But if you will fully love me, though there may be some fire, 'twill not be more than we can bear when moistened and bedewed with Pleasures." JK to FB 08.07.1819
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Re: Tom Keats

Postby Raphael » Wed Dec 01, 2010 7:03 pm

How do you know poor Tom passed at 8.30 am Ennis?
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: Tom Keats

Postby Malia » Wed Dec 01, 2010 7:17 pm

Hi Raphael,
I believe that that time was mentioned in the note that survives written by Brown (on Keats's behalf) to Haslam (?) informing him of Tom's passing.
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Re: Tom Keats

Postby Ennis » Wed Dec 01, 2010 9:25 pm

Raphael wrote:How do you know poor Tom passed at 8.30 am Ennis?


Malia's correct, Raphael. Brown mentions the time in a note he dashed off to Haslam to inform him of Tom's death. :( Haslam was responsible for informing Fanny Keats of her brother's death. Brown's note is near the very end of volume I of Hyder Rollins's collection of Keats's letters.
"But if you will fully love me, though there may be some fire, 'twill not be more than we can bear when moistened and bedewed with Pleasures." JK to FB 08.07.1819
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Re: Tom Keats

Postby Raphael » Wed Dec 01, 2010 10:49 pm

Not read that edition- thanks for the info.
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: Tom Keats

Postby Ennis » Thu Dec 02, 2010 12:03 am

"Fade far away, dissolve, and quite forget
What thou among the leaves hast never known,
The weariness, the fever, and the fret
Here, where men sit and hear each other groan;
Where palsy shakes a few, sad, last grey hairs,
Where youth grows pale, and spectre-thin, and dies;
Where but to think is to be full of sorrow
And leaden-eyed despairs;
Where Beauty cannot keep her lustrous eyes,
Or new Love pine at them beyond to-morrow."

from "Ode To a Nightingale"
s III, vs 21 - 30
Spring, 1819


"Tom's death, as always, obsessed him."

from John Keats
by Robert Gittings
page 424
"But if you will fully love me, though there may be some fire, 'twill not be more than we can bear when moistened and bedewed with Pleasures." JK to FB 08.07.1819
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Re: Tom Keats

Postby Raphael » Fri Dec 03, 2010 1:00 am

To lose a brother one loves so much to such a terrible disease one is powerless to prevent must be so heartbreaking- of course he would be stricken and channel it into his work. Though some scholars think these lines don't refer to Tom. I beg to differ.
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: Tom Keats

Postby Ennis » Fri Dec 03, 2010 2:37 pm

Raphael wrote:To lose a brother one loves so much to such a terrible disease one is powerless to prevent must be so heartbreaking- of course he would be stricken and channel it into his work. Though some scholars think these lines don't refer to Tom. I beg to differ.


Of course they refer to Tom! How could they not. I believe the death of Tom was the one event in John's life the had the most profound effect on Keats's psyche. It was a catalyst: it made him "susceptible" to Fanny Brawne, and, subconsciously, cemented in him that philosophy of the necessity of suffering to create. Most of the 1820 volume is the result. Just think of that poet, holed up in rooms rented from the Bentley's, George has deserted both of his brothers, and he's creating HYPERION while nursing his dying, beloved younger brother!
Last edited by Ennis on Fri Dec 03, 2010 4:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"But if you will fully love me, though there may be some fire, 'twill not be more than we can bear when moistened and bedewed with Pleasures." JK to FB 08.07.1819
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Re: Tom Keats

Postby Raphael » Fri Dec 03, 2010 3:44 pm

If he had become "susceptable" to Fanny- it was due to her inital kindness to a young bereaved young man and her obviously vivacious cheerful character (as well as her beauty). But even if he had not been berveaved he would still have loved her- he could have fell in love with many of the young women he met, but he didn't- Fanny was the one.
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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