Poems to Keats

The life of John Keats the man: his family, his friends, and his contemporaries.

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Re: Poems to Keats

Postby Ennis » Tue Sep 21, 2010 8:31 pm

Bard of Passion,

I know this is not the thread or the time (like 2 years too late), but leave Fanny Brawne alone! :evil:
"But if you will fully love me, though there may be some fire, 'twill not be more than we can bear when moistened and bedewed with Pleasures." JK to FB 08.07.1819
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Re: Poems to Keats

Postby Ennis » Mon Nov 08, 2010 10:12 pm

Read Thomas Hardy's "At Lulworth Cove." He also has written one about Keats haunting Wentworth Place, but the exact title escapes me. I'll try to remember to take my copies from my notebook to school tomorrow so I can post them for y'all to read. Eloquently sad ones, they are.
Robert Cooperman's "Petitions for Immortality" is a biography of Keats written in free verse. It's a beautiful, slim little thing that I think all Keatsians would appreciate.
"But if you will fully love me, though there may be some fire, 'twill not be more than we can bear when moistened and bedewed with Pleasures." JK to FB 08.07.1819
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Re: Poems to Keats

Postby Ennis » Tue Nov 09, 2010 5:54 pm

Here's Hardy's "At Lulworth Cove a Century Back"

Had I lived a hundred years ago
I might have gone, as I have gone this year,
By Warmwell Cross on to a Cove I know,
And Time have placed his finger on me there:

'You see that man?' -- I might have looked, and said,
'O yes: I see him. One that boat has brought
Which dropped down Channel round Saint Alban's Head.
So commonplace a youth calls not my thought.'

'You see that man?' -- 'Why yes; I told you; yes:
Of an idling town-sort; thin; hair brown in hue;
And as the evening light scants less and less
He looks up at a star, as many do.'

'You see that man?' -- 'Nay, leave me!' then I plead,
'I have fifteen miles to vamp across the lea,
And it grows dark, and I am weary-kneed:
I have said the third time: yes, that man I see!'

'Good. That man goes to Rome -- to death, despair;
And no one notes him now but you and I:
A hundred years, and the world will follow him there,
And bend with reverence where his ashes lie.'


Enough said. Thanks, Mr. Hardy.
"But if you will fully love me, though there may be some fire, 'twill not be more than we can bear when moistened and bedewed with Pleasures." JK to FB 08.07.1819
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Re: Poems to Keats

Postby Saturn » Tue Nov 09, 2010 6:08 pm

It's a shame that Hardy's poetry has been [almost] overshadowed by his [admittedly brilliant] novels because his poetry is extraordinary and it was what he wished to be seen as, a poet. Although Shelley was a much bigger influence on him personally this homage to Keats is clearly heartfelt and understanding of Keats' significance.
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
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Re: Poems to Keats

Postby Ennis » Tue Nov 09, 2010 7:56 pm

Saturn wrote:It's a shame that Hardy's poetry has been [almost] overshadowed by his [admittedly brilliant] novels because his poetry is extraordinary and it was what he wished to be seen as, a poet. Although Shelley was a much bigger influence on him personally this homage to Keats is clearly heartfelt and understanding of Keats' significance.


I agree with you, Saturn, about Hardy's novels overshadowing his poetry. Hardy was an early admirer of Keats and did much to heighten interest in Keats as a poet.

The biography of this poem is interesting:

The poem was written in September of 1920. Hardy had apparently remembered an exchange of letters he had with Sir Sidney Colvin in 1914. Colvin was seeking Hardy's help in identifying the Dorset location at which Keats might have put ashore on his journey to Rome. Hardy had suggested Lulworth Cove as a likely location because many of the geographical features there matched up with Severn's (artist's eye) diary accounts of the landing. The result of this rememberance was the poem.
"But if you will fully love me, though there may be some fire, 'twill not be more than we can bear when moistened and bedewed with Pleasures." JK to FB 08.07.1819
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Re: Poems to Keats

Postby Ennis » Tue Nov 09, 2010 9:22 pm

Another Hardy/Keats poem you might enjoy:

"At a House in Hampstead"

O poet, come you haunting here
Where streets have stolen up all around,
And never a nightingale pours one
Full-throated sound?

Drawn from your drowse by the Seven famed Hills,
Thought you to find all just the same
Here shining, as in hours of old,
If you but came?

What will you do in your surprise
At seeing that changes wrought in Rome
Are wrought yet more on the misty slope
One time your home?

Will you wake wind-wafts on these stairs?
Swing the doors open noisily?
Show as an umbraged ghost beside
Your ancient tree?

Or will you, softening, the while
You further and yet further look,
Learn that a laggard few would fain
Preserve your nook? . . .

Where the Piazza steps incline,
And catch late light at eventide,
I once stood, in that Rome, and thought,
"'Twas here he died."

I drew to a violet-sprinkled spot,
Where day and night a pyramid keeps
Uplifted its white hand, and said,
"'Tis there he sleeps."

Pleasanter now it is to hold
That here, where sang he, more of him
Remains than where he, tuneless, cold,
Passed to the dim.
"But if you will fully love me, though there may be some fire, 'twill not be more than we can bear when moistened and bedewed with Pleasures." JK to FB 08.07.1819
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Re: Poems to Keats

Postby Raphael » Wed Nov 10, 2010 12:39 am

Ennis wrote:Read Thomas Hardy's "At Lulworth Cove." He also has written one about Keats haunting Wentworth Place, but the exact title escapes me. I'll try to remember to take my copies from my notebook to school tomorrow so I can post them for y'all to read. Eloquently sad ones, they are.
Robert Cooperman's "Petitions for Immortality" is a biography of Keats written in free verse. It's a beautiful, slim little thing that I think all Keatsians would appreciate.



Thanks for those Ennis- I have read some of Thomas Hardy's novels, and seen the TV adapatations- didn't know he also wrote poetry. The ones to John are clearly heartfelt- love the lines:

And no one notes him now but you and I:
A hundred years, and the world will follow him there,
And bend with reverence where his ashes lie.'


I hadn't heard of the Cooperman book- will have to get that one day!
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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