Page 8 of 11

PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2006 11:49 pm
by Saturn
Can we have a clue please Malia? :?

PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2006 11:56 pm
by Despondence
I know I've read that episode....I'm sure it was recounted in Motion, but where oh where... :lol:

PostPosted: Sun Feb 05, 2006 12:08 am
by Saturn
I can vaguely recall it but I'm not sure if my idea is right :?

PostPosted: Sun Feb 05, 2006 12:29 am
by Despondence
Ah - chapter Forty-Nine :)

He told Hunt that he was dying of a broken heart.

They sat in silence for a few moments, then Keats suddenly covered his face with his handkerchief. After he had composed himself, he told Hunt that he was dying of a broken heart. There was no mention of Fanny, and Hunt was bewildered as well as horrified. 'He must have been wonderfully excited to make such a confession,' he said later, 'for his spirit was lofty to a degree of pride.'

PostPosted: Sun Feb 05, 2006 12:30 am
by Saturn
I thought it was something like that.
Now we must wait for Malia to pronounce whether you're correct.

PostPosted: Sun Feb 05, 2006 1:55 am
by Malia
Yes, Despondence, you got it right. :) Keats broke down in tears and declared that he was dying of a broken heart. This is a scene that I believe is referenced in almost every major bio of Keats--and it is a powerful and desperately sad image, I think. Your turn, Despondence.

PostPosted: Mon Feb 06, 2006 8:13 am
by Despondence
Pt. I, Sec. 2, Subsect. XV.--Love of Learning, or overmuch Study. With a Digression on the Misery of Scholars, and why the Muses are -----.

Leonartus Fuchsius, Instit. lib. 3, sect. I, cap. I; Felix Plater, lib. 3, de mentis alienat.; Herc de Saxonia, tract. post. -----, cap. 3, speak of a peculiar fury which comes by overmuch study. Fernelius, lib I, cap. 18, puts study, contemplation and continual meditation as an especial cause of madness: . . .

Which book, and what relevance to Keats?

PostPosted: Mon Feb 06, 2006 9:48 am
by Saturn
That is a really hard one Despondence :?

I can't even guess what the answer is :oops:

PostPosted: Mon Feb 06, 2006 9:36 pm
by Malia
I think I know what this is. . .is it from Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy? I know this was an important book to Keats--and was heavily annotated by him. Some biographers considered his annotations almost a sort of personal journal reflecting, among other things, his ambivalence toward women. I believe he got the idea of the Lamia poem from the Anatomy of Melancholy, too.

PostPosted: Mon Feb 06, 2006 9:47 pm
by Despondence
:lol: You're just unbeatable, Malia, that is indeed from the "Anatomy", where Keats read a passage from Philostratus which gave him the scope for Lamia. I deliberately did not cite that passage, that would have been too easy (and I also blotted out two instances of the word "melancholy" in my quote above...). I figured that anybody who ever leafed through that book would recognize the style of it. A wholly remarkable book, if I may say. You're up!

PostPosted: Mon Feb 06, 2006 10:18 pm
by Malia
Yea :) Though I will have to admit, I have never touched the Anatomy of Melancholy--I didn't even know it was still in print! But I'm pretty good with context clues--and you provided some great ones in your quote from the book, Despondence :)

Next question--which is straight Keats triva and can be found in most biographies, I think.

When Keats and his friends played a "concert," what instrument did Keats often choose?

PostPosted: Tue Feb 07, 2006 12:29 am
by Saturn
Complete guess - was it a trumpet with his hands?

PostPosted: Tue Feb 07, 2006 12:45 am
by Malia
Saturn wrote:Complete guess - was it a trumpet with his hands?


Nope. I'll give you a hint--it was in the woodwinds family ;)

PostPosted: Tue Feb 07, 2006 1:31 am
by Saturn
Clarinet?

PostPosted: Tue Feb 07, 2006 1:39 am
by Malia
Saturn wrote:Clarinet?


No--what instrument has a name that sounds like something Keats would enjoy? (If that's of any help! :lol: )