Fanny Brawne....

The life of John Keats the man: his family, his friends, and his contemporaries.

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Fanny Brawne....

Postby Hope » Sat Dec 21, 2002 9:13 pm

There were several Fannys in Keats' life (seriously!) - can someone tell me a little bit about Fanny Brawne, his "lover"?

I know very little about her except that she received some increible letters from him - I think any girl who receives letters like that would be swept off her feet! :lol:

Is it just me or did Keats pack an awful lot into a very short life?! I am just astounded at his genius at such a young age - he is an inspiration!
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The many Fannies

Postby Lazylolly » Tue Jan 21, 2003 5:47 am

:D

Fanny Brawn lived next to keats in Hampstead and they met during the most creative time in his life. He did not like her much at first, describing her as flirty and childish. However the next year (1819) he fell completely and utterly in love with her. His love consumed him and he began writing the passionate letters which have become almost Keats' trademark.

They secretly became engaged but were unable to marry due to Keats' Lack of financial security. It was at this time that Keats became ill and had to retreat from public and flee for a chance of recovery in Rome. The rest as they say is history.

I know that this is extremely brief with a lot of detail missing, but i hope it satisfies your curiosity untill you can reasearch more about Fanny Brawne yourself.
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Fanny

Postby Stephen Smith » Wed May 12, 2004 9:18 pm

Fanny should've been tender with his love.
So easy it t'was to break it.
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Postby Becky » Wed Feb 09, 2005 1:49 pm

From what I read, she grieved pretty hard for Keats, it just didn't kill her. She remarried 12 years after his death, and arguably tried to disassociate herself from him. Her life wasn't entirely devoid of incident either - her mother was burnt to death outside her home.

Does anyone know anything about the articles Fanny Brawne is supposed to have submitted to Blackwood's Magazine? They are used to suggest she was hardly the ignorant girl her detractors portrayed her as.
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Postby Despondence » Wed Feb 09, 2005 2:14 pm

Becky wrote:Her life wasn't entirely devoid of incident either - her mother was burnt to death outside her home.
Really? when did that happen?

Becky wrote:Does anyone know anything about the articles Fanny Brawne is supposed to have submitted to Blackwood's Magazine? They are used to suggest she was hardly the ignorant girl her detractors portrayed her as.
What's your reference for those articles? Just curious, I never heard of them. I believe she was anything but ignorant, just young and inexperienced. She can hardly be blamed for being made the object of worship by such a temperamental, sensitive and complicated man as Keats. Poor girl - I don't think it was any easier on her than it was on him! As to her "detractors", I think modern biographers take a more understanding and compassionate view of her than her contemporaries (like Brown, or Monckton Milnes).
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Postby Saturn » Wed Feb 09, 2005 11:55 pm

Becky wrote:Her life wasn't entirely devoid of incident either - her mother was burnt to death outside her home.


Really??? X 2 :shock: :shock:

That's something I've never heard myself. I'd also love to know where that information came from.
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
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Postby Becky » Thu Feb 10, 2005 3:28 pm

Fanny Brawne's mother was burnt to death in the door of her house in Wentworth Place in 1829. Her skirts caught fire.

The reference to her articles is from the 1952 Oxford edition of Keats letters, in the bibliographical memoranda by H Buxton Forman, although he does mention he couldn't trace them, perhaps because she was using a pseudonym. H Buxton Forman was a friend of Fanny Brawne's son, I believe.
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Postby Becky » Mon Feb 21, 2005 5:37 pm

Has anyone read Fanny's letters to Fanny (K)?
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Postby Becky » Wed Mar 16, 2005 3:16 pm

I'm taking that as a no then...
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Postby Despondence » Thu Mar 17, 2005 2:23 am

:) That's probably a correct interpretation. Have you read them? I didn't even know they existed, but for sure, I'd be interested in hearing a little about what's in them, and what can be learned from them.
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Postby Malia » Tue Dec 20, 2005 10:25 pm

Becky wrote:Has anyone read Fanny's letters to Fanny (K)?


I own a copy of Fanny Brawne's letters to Fanny Keats. They are an interesting read if only to be able to hear Fanny's own "voice" (rather than try and interpret her personality through the lens of Keats' rather obssessive and bittersweet love for her). To me, she sounds like a smart, practical and straight-forward woman. (Perhaps more outspoken and blunt than typical women of her era, but not outrageously so, in my opinion.)


Stephen Smith said:
Fanny should've been tender with his love.


Am I the only woman out there who believes that Keats wasn't a great lover--at all? If I were Fanny Brawne and was on the receiving end of some of Keats's bitter, jeallous, painfull, accusatory "love" letters, I don't know if I would be able to continue being his girlfriend. I understand that it takes "two to tango" so to speak and that perhaps Fanny wasn't as tactful as she could have been given Keats's sensitive nature, but Keats was *anything* but a romantic lover--half the time he's trying to "break" himself of his love for Fanny.

I think Keats was a great thinker, poet and friend. But lover? Unfortunately, that was not his strongest area. He was a great Romantic poet, but not a romantic man.
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Postby Credo Buffa » Tue Dec 20, 2005 11:25 pm

Malia wrote:Am I the only woman out there who believes that Keats wasn't a great lover--at all? If I were Fanny Brawne and was on the receiving end of some of Keats's bitter, jeallous, painfull, accusatory "love" letters, I don't know if I would be able to continue being his girlfriend. I understand that it takes "two to tango" so to speak and that perhaps Fanny wasn't as tactful as she could have been given Keats's sensitive nature, but Keats was *anything* but a romantic lover--half the time he's trying to "break" himself of his love for Fanny.

ha ha, I know what you mean! Keats seems like he was one of those guys who would be jealous of all your male friends and would do his best to keep you away from them, and I know few women who would put up with that. And the situation sort of reminds me of Elizabeth Bennet's reaction to Mr. Darcy: she gets mad at him when he says that he loves her in spite of his "better judgement". For a person so keen on a poet's ability to embody the thoughts and emotions of another, he sure wasn't able to put himself in Fanny's shoes, or he probably would have at least tried to act differently with her. And, like you say, Fanny could have been a bit more sensitive to Keats's jealous nature, but at the same time, I can definitely see myself in a similar situation saying "Screw this!" and hanging around other guys as much as I want just to get back at him for being so unreasonable ;)
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