Strangeness of Fate

The life of John Keats the man: his family, his friends, and his contemporaries.

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Strangeness of Fate

Postby Malia » Sun Jul 02, 2006 9:50 pm

I wasn't quite sure where this thought fit in on the forum, so I created a new thread :) Once in a while I think about how life's events unfold--and how at one moment in your life you'd never have a clue where you'd be in, say, a year's time. For example, when Joseph Severn and John Keats were introduced (by George Keats, I think), neither could have the faintest clue how their lives would intersect only 4 or 4 1/2 years later--one would die in the other's arms in a foreign country! It sounds so far fetched, and yet, it just proves that life can move in strange directions.
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Postby Saturn » Sun Jul 02, 2006 10:26 pm

Do you have an experience of your own as an illustration Malia?
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
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Postby Malia » Mon Jul 03, 2006 12:12 am

Saturn wrote:Do you have an experience of your own as an illustration Malia?


Had to think about an answer to that one! :) But I remember when I was living in England, a lady I knew there invited me to attend her Anglican church and I remember turning her down saying "I'm happily Catholic and will always be Catholic." Ironically, as the years went by, I ended up leaving the Catholic church and becoming an Episcopalian (as close to Anglican as we have here in America ;) ). I have learned through that experience--and a few other minor ones--never to say "never". In fact, just about every time I say "I'll never...do or be such and such" I end up doing it or it ends up happening! Hmm. . .so, with that logic in play I should say "I'll never win the lottery, I'll never win the lottery" :lol:
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Postby Saturn » Mon Jul 03, 2006 12:15 am

One can but try :lol:
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Postby Credo Buffa » Mon Jul 03, 2006 3:11 am

I think if everyone thinks for a little bit, we all have a story like this. It's one of the more mysterious things in life to think about how the tiniest interaction or decision can come to affect our lives in an extreme way. If I hadn't seen Titanic back when I was, what, fourteen-years-old, I might never have bought the debut CD by Gaelic Storm (the steerage band in the movie), which means I never would have developed a continued interest in the band, which means that I never would have bothered to browse their website nearly seven years later and read that their new fiddle player happened to have a Masters degree in Irish Music from the University of Limerick, which means I never would have learned that such a program existed so that I could apply. :wink: Even moreso, what had to happen in the events of that fiddle player that would lead her to have this degree from this university and end up playing in this band so that I could read her bio? I could go on and on.

One could argue that in Keats's life, if he had had the luxury of a normal, happy childhood, growing up with both his parents, never having to deal with Richard Abbey, etc., that he might never have become a poet, and we wouldn't be here discussing his work, and our lives would be completely different as a result of never having had the opportunity to read his work. :shock:

It's almost enough to make one believe in fate.
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Postby Malia » Mon Jul 03, 2006 3:38 am

Credo Buffa wrote:
One could argue that in Keats's life, if he had had the luxury of a normal, happy childhood, growing up with both his parents, never having to deal with Richard Abbey, etc., that he might never have become a poet, and we wouldn't be here discussing his work, and our lives would be completely different as a result of never having had the opportunity to read his work. :shock:

It's almost enough to make one believe in fate.


So true! Just goes to show that we weave closer ties than we might think at first in this human family of ours :)
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Postby Credo Buffa » Mon Jul 03, 2006 6:19 am

There's actually a really interesting article on this very idea of human interconnectedness over time:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060701/ap_on_sc/brotherhood_of_man;_ylt=AjcwITfsLaCjN3GWUSyEI.IDW7oF;_ylu=X3oDMTBhZDhxNDFzBHNlYwNtZW5ld3M-

However, we can apply this same principle--perhaps in a more fanciful way--to the way people connect through the world at the same time, as well as over time, like your initial example of Keats and Severn, Malia.
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Postby dks » Mon Jul 03, 2006 3:28 pm

Great topic, guys! You all are discussing the very foremost idea of the novel "The Five People You Meet in Heaven" by Mitch Albom...fantastic fiction, by the way, but yes, that "interconnectedness" helps perpetuate the pulse of life, I believe.

I have so many stories about this very phenomenon, I don't know where to begin... :shock:
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Postby Malia » Mon Jul 03, 2006 11:06 pm

Credo Buffa wrote:There's actually a really interesting article on this very idea of human interconnectedness over time:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060701/ap_on_sc/brotherhood_of_man;_ylt=AjcwITfsLaCjN3GWUSyEI.IDW7oF;_ylu=X3oDMTBhZDhxNDFzBHNlYwNtZW5ld3M-

However, we can apply this same principle--perhaps in a more fanciful way--to the way people connect through the world at the same time, as well as over time, like your initial example of Keats and Severn, Malia.


That's a very interesting study, Credo. Thanks for posting the link :) It just goes to show--again--that we are interconnected.
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Re:

Postby Raphael » Tue Oct 27, 2009 6:14 pm

dks wrote:Great topic, guys! You all are discussing the very foremost idea of the novel "The Five People You Meet in Heaven" by Mitch Albom...fantastic fiction, by the way, but yes, that "interconnectedness" helps perpetuate the pulse of life, I believe.

I have so many stories about this very phenomenon, I don't know where to begin... :shock:


I borrowed that a few weeks ago from a friend- it was really good. I wholheartedly believe in interconnectedness. I probably have got some examples of my own but I can't think of any right now and I have to be quick here on the library internet, so no time to think of anything..
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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