Audio Keats and Podcasts

The life of John Keats the man: his family, his friends, and his contemporaries.

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Re: Audio Keats and Podcasts

Postby Raphael » Wed Feb 24, 2010 5:54 pm

Yes, I have the Grant Scott edition and also the Gittings edition (although my paperback copy is falling apart, unfortunately). I read through the Grant Scott several times a week--I often make it my "before bed" reading. Someday, I would love to be able to read his letters aloud the way I hear them spoken in my head; the letters are so beautiful.


I thought you would- I was asking so i can mark out passages for you and use the page numbers as an easy reference to find them. I have borrowed it from the library and keep renewing it! I'll buy it when I can afford it. I love re reading the letters- there's always something new to find in them. He really was absolutely magical and fascinating! Amazing mind and intellect for such a young man.



I'll see what I can do about podcasting some of his more popular/famous passages, such as the Vale of Soulmaking and the Mansion of Many Apartments. And yes, if you can hunt down some more humorous passages, I'd be happy to podcast them!


I love the snuff reference- that he has "given up snuff very nearly quite"- I find it very cute. :D
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: Audio Keats and Podcasts

Postby Malia » Wed Feb 24, 2010 6:39 pm

I don't recall that snuff reference, Raphael--it is totally Keats, isn't it? :lol:
Yes, please send along any sections you'd like read. It would be neat to get out of my own reading rut and open up to parts of his letters that I might otherwise skip over (as, like so many other Keats fans, I have my favorite letters that I read and re-read like a lover!).
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Re: Audio Keats and Podcasts

Postby Raphael » Wed Feb 24, 2010 7:10 pm

I don't recall that snuff reference, Raphael--it is totally Keats, isn't it? :lol:


Oh it really is- it is so cute and funny the way he writes it. I think it is in the same letter ( to George and Georgiana) from which you quoted in your podcast. He says "I have given up snuff very nearly quite." He then goes on to say that Dilke is coming to sit with him and he wishes it would be soon as he would like some snuff at that moment but his snuff box is empty! So he is hasn't tried too hard to stop snuffing :lol:
I'll ref you that tommorrow! Haven't the book on me.



Yes, please send along any sections you'd like read. It would be neat to get out of my own reading rut and open up to parts of his letters that I might otherwise skip over (as, like so many other Keats fans, I have my favorite letters that I read and re-read like a lover!).


I will- it will be a pleasure to re read them tonight! What letters are your favourites then/ favourite bits?
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: Audio Keats and Podcasts

Postby Malia » Wed Feb 24, 2010 11:46 pm

I like so many parts of Keats's letters; but I will admit to being forever moved by his last letters to Fanny and also the letter he writes to Brown from Naples. My heart just aches every time I read them!

I love his humor, too. There are quite a few passages that fit into that category and right now I can't recall anything specifically. I do enjoy passages where Keats mentions very mundane things (your snuff reference is a great example). One I recall off the top of my head is when Keats recounts a visit to the Wylies. He knocks on their door and when the servant answers, he says he asked "Is Mrs. Wylie within?" (I just love the way they put a sentence together back then! :lol: ) and then he goes on to describe the servant and also the dress Mrs. Wylie is wearing. These little details are really intriguing to a person living 200 years into the future!
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Re: Audio Keats and Podcasts

Postby Raphael » Thu Feb 25, 2010 3:10 pm

I like so many parts of Keats's letters; but I will admit to being forever moved by his last letters to Fanny and also the letter he writes to Brown from Naples. My heart just aches every time I read them!


I ache too reading those- I have never read anything as moving as his last letters in my whole life.


One I recall off the top of my head is when Keats recounts a visit to the Wylies. He knocks on their door and when the servant answers, he says he asked "Is Mrs. Wylie within?" (I just love the way they put a sentence together back then! :lol: ) and then he goes on to describe the servant and also the dress Mrs. Wylie is wearing. These little details are really intriguing to a person living 200 years into the future!


I don't recall seeing this in the Grant Scott edition- what page is it on? I too, love the way he puts his sentences together. I wonder how true they are to the way he spoke? I love the expressions he uses like "Upon My Soul". What expressions do you like that he uses?

Below is my little request list ( from G Scott ed):

The snuff reference- page 228.

An hilarious mickey taking on Abbey and " a petition to the governers of St Lukes." It starts with "Don't think I am writing a petition to the Governers of St Lukes" and ends with " "Witnessed by Richard Abbey and co. cumfamiliaris and consanguinniis , signed Count de Cockaigne." :lol: I think he should have sent that to po faced Abbey! Really Malia- it is a hoot! It made me roar with laughter ! It illustrates beautifully just how witty and funny he was.I read that Joseph Severn said that John could be very funny and even did the voices of the people he was taking the mickey out of. Wouldn't you just love to have seen that? I love the fact his humour hasn't dated that much- that us today can still find it all so funny.


28-9- the letter to the Reynolds sisters- most of this letter is very funny and witty.

195-6. his aims and poetry. It starts with " In the second place I will speak of my views" and the bit ending "but even now I am perhaps not speaking from myself."

356- his plans and the nectarine eating- starting from " I would willingly have recourse to other means" to "I shall certainly breed."

381-3. He gives a funny description of Brown ( Keats my good felloow! ) and how he plays a joke on Brown, and then gives an account of a joke played on himself at the digs in Winchester. It starts with "Saturday. If you would prefer a joke or two to anything else." It ends with "If the Lady tells tits I shall put a very grave and moral face on the matter with the old Gentleman."
What fascinates me about this is that this is from one of his journal letters to George, and it's really long and has humour in it, yet around the same time he wrote a short sad letter to Fanny Brawne telling her he wasn't happy.
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: Audio Keats and Podcasts

Postby Malia » Thu Feb 25, 2010 3:44 pm

Those are all excellent, Raphael! I started chuckling just reading your *references* to the letters :)
I will try and find the page number that corresponds to that visit to the Wylie's I mentioned. I also found another reference to snuff (and the underlying message that Keats is trying to swear off it--again!) in a letter to Reynolds from September 21, 1819. That letter is both witty and serious and includes the almost glancing reference to his (in my opinion) greatest poem, To Autumn. It is a great example of Keats as king of the understatement. It begins on pg. 344 of the Grant Scott ed.
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Re: Audio Keats and Podcasts

Postby Raphael » Thu Feb 25, 2010 4:19 pm

Those are all excellent, Raphael! I started chuckling just reading your *references* to the letters :)


Oh wait til you read them in full- he is really just so cute and funny! A delightful personlaity to be sure!

I will try and find the page number that corresponds to that visit to the Wylie's I mentioned.

Thanks. I have seen one ref to the Wylies in which he says he kept Mrs Wylie laughing with his jokes!


I also found another reference to snuff (and the underlying message that Keats is trying to swear off it--again!) in a letter to Reynolds from September 21, 1819. That letter is both witty and serious and includes the almost glancing reference to his (in my opinion) greatest poem, To Autumn. It is a great example of Keats as king of the understatement. It begins on pg. 344 of the Grant Scott ed.



I'll look that up tonight. :D
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: Audio Keats and Podcasts

Postby Malia » Thu Feb 25, 2010 4:42 pm

Raphael, I found the letter that contains the reference to Mrs. Wylie's dress and his asking the servant if Mrs. Wylie was "within". It is on p. 374 in a letter to George and Georgiana dated 17-27 September, 1819. The passage starts at about the middle of the page and it includes a few other "everyday" type references such as how Henry carved the beef they ate and how Charles is "growing up" (his facial hair is becoming more noticeable and fashionable). It's all very domesticated :)
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Re: Audio Keats and Podcasts

Postby Raphael » Fri Feb 26, 2010 4:07 pm

Malia wrote:Raphael, I found the letter that contains the reference to Mrs. Wylie's dress and his asking the servant if Mrs. Wylie was "within". It is on p. 374 in a letter to George and Georgiana dated 17-27 September, 1819. The passage starts at about the middle of the page and it includes a few other "everyday" type references such as how Henry carved the beef they ate and how Charles is "growing up" (his facial hair is becoming more noticeable and fashionable). It's all very domesticated :)


Yes, I found it last night- I had forgotten that oneI Another funny letter- expecially the refs to the maid. There is another funny one Malia- but I fear it would be too bawdy for you to include in your recital, the subject matter ( once the ladies had left the men to it.. :wink: ) being about a certain rude word and Pots and Cupboards! :lol:
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: Audio Keats and Podcasts

Postby Malia » Fri Feb 26, 2010 5:43 pm

Oh I love that letter, Raphael! Just to paraphrase--someone in the party said "An opposition pot!" and someone else (Rice?) responded, "yes, in one case you have a yard for your pot and in the other, a pot for your yard!"
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Re: Audio Keats and Podcasts

Postby Raphael » Sat Feb 27, 2010 3:57 pm

Malia wrote:Oh I love that letter, Raphael! Just to paraphrase--someone in the party said "An opposition pot!" and someone else (Rice?) responded, "yes, in one case you have a yard for your pot and in the other, a pot for your yard!"


That line is really funny- here's a question- do you think Frank Floodgate existed? :lol:
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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