Posthumous Keats ~ have you read it?

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Posthumous Keats ~ have you read it?

Postby harvest » Fri May 07, 2010 11:17 pm

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/08/books/08book.html

a friend actually works w/ the author & told me today she'd ask him to sign it for me... ~ i thought that was quite nice of her.

what did you think if you did read it? i am just beginning.
Now a soft kiss - Aye, by that kiss, I vow an endless bliss. ~ j. keats
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Re: Posthumous Keats ~ have you read it?

Postby Raphael » Sat May 08, 2010 12:14 am

That's great to get it signed! I haven't read it yet- too broke to buy books at the moment..
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: Posthumous Keats ~ have you read it?

Postby jesleeall » Mon May 17, 2010 12:28 pm

I read it and I enjoyed it, with a few reservations. I got tired of the author's repeated unflattering comments on Joseph Severn...why did he feel he needed to do that? Severn may have been a rather ordinary human being but, to me, he will always be a hero and an angel and I don't have much patience with negative comments about him. The book isn't a biography; it's more like a series of ruminations on Keats's life and death, arranged around a number of topics. For instance, in one chapter he talks about the various images of Keats that sprang up after his death, and the paintings and sculptures that idealized him in some way rather than portraying him realistically. It's in this chapter he mentions the Rembrandt painting that a number of Keats's friends thought looked just like Keats. The book is good and very moving at times. The author clearly loves John Keats.


[url]http://www.encore-editions.com/artists/rembrandt2/thumbs/Young_Man.jpg/url]
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Re: Posthumous Keats ~ have you read it?

Postby Raphael » Mon May 17, 2010 2:06 pm

I read it and I enjoyed it, with a few reservations. I got tired of the author's repeated unflattering comments on Joseph Severn...why did he feel he needed to do that? Severn may have been a rather ordinary human being but, to me, he will always be a hero and an angel and I don't have much patience with negative comments about him. The book isn't a biography; it's more like a series of ruminations on Keats's life and death, arranged around a number of topics. For instance, in one chapter he talks about the various images of Keats that sprang up after his death, and the paintings and sculptures that idealized him in some way rather than portraying him realistically. It's in this chapter he mentions the Rembrandt painting that a number of Keats's friends thought looked just like Keats. The book is good and very moving at times. The author clearly loves John Keats.


I'm glad the author loves John. It sounds an interesting book- what negative things does he say about Joseph Severn? I actually think Joseph proved himself when caring for our dear poet- how devoted he was, especially as he didn't know what it was going to be like and had no medical experience nor experience of seeing a loved one fade away- it must have been heartbreaking. As much as a good friend Brown was I doubt he would have coped as well as Joseph Severn did. He was a talented artist and made a good career for himself and was well liked by many.Nobody is perfect, but he strikes me as having been a good person.
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: Posthumous Keats ~ have you read it?

Postby jesleeall » Tue May 18, 2010 9:56 pm

Most of Plumly's criticisms of Severn are about him being a mediocre artist. He says art was "for better or worse" Severn's first language. He describes Severn's "lack of talent," he says of Severn's writing: "like his painting, his prose is mediocre," he describes Severn as a "young man of ambition" in a way that sounds somewhat negative. Nothing major, it's just that I found the repeated references to Severn's mediocrity as an artist to be irritating.
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Re: Posthumous Keats ~ have you read it?

Postby Raphael » Tue May 18, 2010 10:06 pm

Thanks for your reply. I disagree with Plumy on Joseph's art abilities- I think he was a good artist- much better than Benjamin Haydon. Interestingly, John's sister and Charles Cowden Clarke thought his portraits of John very accurate ( the ivory minature and the charcoal drawing).
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: Posthumous Keats ~ have you read it?

Postby Ennis » Tue Jun 01, 2010 9:19 pm

I've read "Posthumous Keats" and enjoyed a poet's take on the life of the greatest writer of any time, past, present, and future! However, it's been two years since I've read it, so I'm not sure I can comment on any opinions stated without rereading it. I would like to share two titles with y'all and hopefully get some feedback.
The first is a work of fiction by Peter Ackroyd (the Romantic poetry scholar) called "The Casebook of Victor Frankenstein". This is an interesting little novel because one of the significant characters is a young, orphaned medical student with a sister named Fanny. He harbours dreams of becoming a poet and his name happens to be . . . Jack Keat!! I'll let you read the novel for yourself to find out how "our" Mr. Keat figures into the rest of the narrative. Oh! According to the Imdb site (which I visit frequently to read and post on their "Bright Star" forum) a film is in the works. I don't recognize the director's name, but I did read that Tim Burton has something to do with helping to put the film together. Makes me (sort of) wonder . . . ?? Maybe Depp as the good doctor and Whishaw reprising his role as . . .?? There really wasn't much information one way or the other. The other book is nonfiction - titled "The Young Romantics" (the author's name is Daisy (?) something-or-other) and it's about the 2nd generation Romantic poets. This one I haven't read yet - just bought it Sunday. But I'm always a sucker for anything Keats related.
"But if you will fully love me, though there may be some fire, 'twill not be more than we can bear when moistened and bedewed with Pleasures." JK to FB 08.07.1819
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Re: Posthumous Keats ~ have you read it?

Postby Raphael » Tue Jun 01, 2010 10:33 pm

Ennis wrote:I've read "Posthumous Keats" and enjoyed a poet's take on the life of the greatest writer of any time, past, present, and future! However, it's been two years since I've read it, so I'm not sure I can comment on any opinions stated without rereading it. I would like to share two titles with y'all and hopefully get some feedback.
The first is a work of fiction by Peter Ackroyd (the Romantic poetry scholar) called "The Casebook of Victor Frankenstein". This is an interesting little novel because one of the significant characters is a young, orphaned medical student with a sister named Fanny. He harbours dreams of becoming a poet and his name happens to be . . . Jack Keat!! I'll let you read the novel for yourself to find out how "our" Mr. Keat figures into the rest of the narrative. Oh! According to the Imdb site (which I visit frequently to read and post on their "Bright Star" forum) a film is in the works. I don't recognize the director's name, but I did read that Tim Burton has something to do with helping to put the film together. Makes me (sort of) wonder . . . ?? Maybe Depp as the good doctor and Whishaw reprising his role as . . .?? There really wasn't much information one way or the other. The other book is nonfiction - titled "The Young Romantics" (the author's name is Daisy (?) something-or-other) and it's about the 2nd generation Romantic poets. This one I haven't read yet - just bought it Sunday. But I'm always a sucker for anything Keats related.


That book and film sound intriguing Ennis! Thanks for this tidbit and welcome to the forum!
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: Posthumous Keats ~ have you read it?

Postby Cybele » Tue Jun 01, 2010 10:46 pm

Ennis wrote:The first is a work of fiction by Peter Ackroyd (the Romantic poetry scholar) called "The Casebook of Victor Frankenstein". This is an interesting little novel because one of the significant characters is a young, orphaned medical student with a sister named Fanny. He harbours dreams of becoming a poet and his name happens to be . . . Jack Keat!! I'll let you read the novel for yourself to find out how "our" Mr. Keat figures into the rest of the narrative. Oh! According to the Imdb site (which I visit frequently to read and post on their "Bright Star" forum) a film is in the works. I don't recognize the director's name, but I did read that Tim Burton has something to do with helping to put the film together. Makes me (sort of) wonder . . . ?? Maybe Depp as the good doctor and Whishaw reprising his role as . . .?? There really wasn't much information one way or the other. The other book is nonfiction - titled "The Young Romantics" (the author's name is Daisy (?) something-or-other) and it's about the 2nd generation Romantic poets. This one I haven't read yet - just bought it Sunday. But I'm always a sucker for anything Keats related.


Sounds like a fun read, Ennis. I'll keep an eye out for it.
"The philosopher proves that the philosopher exists. The poet merely enjoys existence."
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