Page 1 of 1

New publication: "George Keats of Kentucky: A Life"

PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2012 2:05 pm
by Cath
Good news!

Following the success of Denise Gigante's The Keats Brothers last year, Lawrence Crutcher will be publishing the first stand-alone biography of Keats's elder brother, George, this autumn. Here's the info:

Title: George Keats of Kentucky: A Life
Authors: Lawrence M Crutcher (Author), John E Kleber (Foreword)
Publisher: University of Kentucky Press
Pub. date: 21 Oct 2012
Length: 384 pages

John Keats's biographers have rarely been fair to George Keats (1797--1841) -- pushing him to the background as the younger brother, painting him as a prodigal son, or labeling him as the "business brother." Some have even condemned him as a heartless villain who took more than his fair share of an inheritance and abandoned the ailing poet to pursue his own interests. In this authoritative biography, author Lawrence M. Crutcher demonstrates that George Keats deserves better. Crutcher traces his subject from Regency London to the American frontier, correcting the misconceptions surrounding the Keats brothers' relationship and revealing the details of George's remarkable life in Louisville, Kentucky.

Brilliantly illustrated with more than ninety color photographs, this engaging book reveals how George Keats embraced new business opportunities to become an important member of the developing urban community. In addition, George Keats of Kentucky offers a rare and fascinating glimpse into nineteenth-century life, commerce, and entrepreneurship in Louisville and the Bluegrass.


"Delivers a rich, fully drawn picture of the brother of John Keats. Until now, no biographer has delved into George Keats's life so completely." -- Carol Kyros Walker, author of Walking North with Keats" --

"An interesting account of an Englishman coming to America in the early 19th century and making a life for himself and his family in Kentucky -- his acclimation, acculturation, successes, and failures." -- James Holmberg, curator of special collections at The Filson Historical Society" --

About the Author
Lawrence Crutcher is the great-great-great-grandson of George Keats and the author of The Keats Family. He lives in San Francisco, California.

http://www.kentuckypress.com/live/title_detail.php?titleid=3288

http://www.amazon.com/George-Keats-Kentucky-Topics-History/dp/0813136881/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1340628656&sr=8-1&keywords=George+Keats+of+Kentucky%3A+A+Life

Re: New publication: "George Keats of Kentucky: A Life"

PostPosted: Fri Jul 06, 2012 4:42 am
by Cybele
Thank you for the heads up on the new book!
I knew Mr Crutcher was a descendant -- there's a memorial monument/tombstone (with a relief carving of the Sosibios vase) with the name "Crutcher" on it very near George & Georgiana's graves in Louisville. I look forward to it!
( I'm trying to get the hang of my new electronic gizmo. So if I post something that doesn't make sense please ignore it.)

Re: New publication: "George Keats of Kentucky: A Life"

PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2012 4:50 pm
by Cath
You're welcome Cybele!

Re: New publication: "George Keats of Kentucky: A Life"

PostPosted: Wed Nov 07, 2012 12:14 pm
by Cath
Now that Obama has won the election, we can get back to talking about the most important man on the planet..........: Mr Keats! :lol:

Lawrence Crutcher's biography of Geoge Keats is going to be published in a few days - on November 15th in the UK and November 18th in the US. Are any of you guys going to be reading this? I think I will. Even though Denise Gigante's The Keats Brothers and Crutcher's own The Keats Family have already taken a closer look at him, this is the first stand-alone biography of George and is richly illustrated. I'm interested!

Re: New publication: "George Keats of Kentucky: A Life"

PostPosted: Wed Nov 07, 2012 2:05 pm
by Ravenwing
Adieu.

Re: New publication: "George Keats of Kentucky: A Life"

PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2012 7:32 pm
by Cybele
Cath wrote:Now that Obama has won the election, we can get back to talking about the most important man on the planet..........: Mr Keats! :lol:

Lawrence Crutcher's biography of Geoge Keats is going to be published in a few days - on November 15th in the UK and November 18th in the US. Are any of you guys going to be reading this? I think I will. Even though Denise Gigante's The Keats Brothers and Crutcher's own The Keats Family have already taken a closer look at him, this is the first stand-alone biography of George and is richly illustrated. I'm interested!

Re: New publication: "George Keats of Kentucky: A Life"

PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2012 7:49 pm
by Cybele
Ravenwing wrote:From: http://www.kentuckypress.com/live/title ... tleid=3288

"John Keats’s biographers have rarely been fair to George Keats (1797–1841)—pushing him to the background as the younger brother, painting him as a prodigal son, or labeling him as the “business brother.” Some have even condemned him as a heartless villain who took more than his fair share of an inheritance and abandoned the ailing poet to pursue his own interests."

Do any of you happen to know which John Keats' biographies it is specifically that have "condemned" George Keats as such? I should like to read those. What I have read thus far, are three of John Keats' earliest brief biographies, and an almost equal length of a longer one; I do look for his later biographies if in any second hand book store, but thus far, such shelves for those books have proved to be starving and bare. The latest Roe work is expected to be in new book stores next week.

If George Keats was a philistine, then I do not understand why his life would merit a biography; it seems to be an instance of name dropping by its author whose own bias towards nepotism is apparent as pointed out by the fact that he is a very distant blood relation of John Keats who has not written any poetry. That is what it seems. It might be interesting to read how he rationalizes or denies George's theft of John's financial inheritance from their parents, although, if that is what indeed happened, then what a cad, what a sophist, to defend him.


Ravenwing, my personal belief is that George's return in England in the middle of winter was a desperate act. (He left his young wife and -- I believe -- their new infant behind and crossed the Atlantic in a wooden boat! Yikes! ) Several Keats biographers have mentioned that the brothers held their money in common. George came to England and then left with never having visited his little sister. Doing this might give some indication of his haste to get back to America. (Fanny Keats never really forgave him for this.) Plus, George left only a matter of days before John's hemorrhage, John was very possibly not feeling very well during his brother's visit and may have, indeed, had a very good idea of what was wrong. It's my gut-feeling that when George learned of his brother's illness he felt terrible about what had happened, and that their last visit had been, well, *their last visit.*

Yes, he was completely convinced of his brother's genius and tremendous talent, but George's subsequent devotion to promoting his brother's work may have been, in part, an attempt to soothe his own conscience. Also, his behavior in Louisville (that of a *very* civic-minded man) seems to indicate (to me, anyway) that he was not a cad, but a complicated and sometimes imperfect person, just like most of us are.

Re: New publication: "George Keats of Kentucky: A Life"

PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2012 4:31 pm
by Cath
Crutcher's book has now been published in hardback and as an e-book; he's currently doing book signings in Kentucky to promote it.

Re: New publication: "George Keats of Kentucky: A Life"

PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2012 4:37 pm
by Ravenwing
Adieu.

Re: New publication: "George Keats of Kentucky: A Life"

PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2012 8:10 pm
by Cybele
Ravenwing wrote:Hi Cybele, *Smiles,

Was it that George did return to the States before John had a hemorrhage, or before Tom had a hemorrhage? Perhaps George abruptly left when he did and without having said hello to his sister, at the request of John or Tom, whoever it was that sadly did suffer a hemorrhage a mere few days later, if that brother of George felt that their situation was hopeless; if so, it might have been their wish for George to remember him as not entirely on death's door.

But what of the horrible accusation that George claimed John's part of their parents' financial inheritance? Which biographers was it whom did suggest as much? I suppose that Mr. Crutcher did address such an accusation in his book, as it is mentioned in his book's synopsis, but if so, then what did he, in fact, base his defense of George upon? The defence that you mentioned, sounds a lot like the defence put forth in Oscar Wilde's "An Ideal Husband," regarding Sir Robert Chiltern, the potential candidate for Prime Minister, who had a skeleton in his closet due to his having acquired his fortune from insider trading, where it was argued that he should not be considered as a cad because he then became a "civic-minded man."

From Ravenwing.


Ravenwing, when George returned to England, it was after Tom's death. He may have felt that he was due his share of Tom's inheritance. Also, I believe that several biographers say that the Keats brothers held their money in common, and George needed money *now*, if not sooner. He may not have realized that John's finances were in such shambles and he certainly was in the dark about John's desire to marry Fanny B. John probably should have been more assertive with George, but may simply have not had the energy to do so.

It's a good point you make about Wilde's fictional character, but I don't feel that the situations are entirely analogous. George was driven more by desperation than greed, IMO.

Another thing that I've not seen mentioned in any biographies is Georgiana's personality. Naomi Kirk, in her unpublished dissertation, says that "Little George" had a mind of her own, didn't suffer gossips kindly and -- again, IMO -- may have been a fairly assertive woman in her own right. She (and this is wholly my jumping to unfounded conclusions) may have told George that he must come back to Kentucky from England with enough money to get their little family away from possible/probable financial destruction or else.

Re: New publication: "George Keats of Kentucky: A Life"

PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2012 8:21 pm
by Cybele
Pardon my cross-posting in two threads, but there was a review of Roe's biography plus little side-bar about the new Crutcher book.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000142 ... 18776.html

Re: New publication: "George Keats of Kentucky: A Life"

PostPosted: Fri Mar 01, 2013 5:49 am
by Cybele
The Keats Shelley House tweeted that there is a new review of the Crutcher biography available on line through the Washington Times.
[url] http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/201 ... -kentucky/[url]