Keats Sighting in St Augustine's Conversion

Events that are related to Keats, lectures, new publications. Also your Photos of Keats-related locations, events etc.

Moderators: Saturn, Malia

Keats Sighting in St Augustine's Conversion

Postby bard of passion » Sun Feb 18, 2007 6:12 pm

Trying to get caught up with my reading list, I came across this paragraph in Garry Will's 2004 St Augustine's Conversion (book 4 of his series):

"The desire to cultivate feelings of relief has been noted by others. Benjamin Haydon wrote of his friend, the poet John Keats: "He once covered his tongue and throat as far as he could reach with Cayenne pepper, in order to appreciate the delicious coolness of claret in all its glory -- his own expression." (Tom Taylor, editor, The Life of Benjamin Robert Haydon, From His Autobiography and Journals, London, 1853, vol. 2, p. 9) To this day, bartenders put out free peanuts and other salty foods to encourage people to buy more drinks." [notes, p 115]

I usually (as a lark) like to check my books' indices before reading to note the number of times my favorite poets are referenced. Without a doubt, it's mostly Shakespeare (regardless of the book's subject or genre) and in a distant, but noticeable, second is our friend, "the poet John Keats."
"I can see!" cried the blind man, as he picked up the hammer and saw.
bard of passion
 
Posts: 52
Joined: Thu Jan 18, 2007 7:00 am
Location: san luis obispo, ca

Postby Malia » Sun Feb 18, 2007 7:49 pm

Great sighting, Bard of Passion :)

It is interesting to read that account of Keats and the cayanne pepper. Somewhere I read (and unfortunately I can't quote it off the top of my head) that this story was just that--a story and that Keats most likely didn't "do" the pepper. I'm inclined to think that, considering Keats's nagging sore throat problems, he wouldn't want to encourage its irritation. But, thinking about it again, he *was* a young lad and young lads have been known to do some pretty stupid things! :lol: :roll:
Last edited by Malia on Sun Feb 18, 2007 11:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Stay Awake!
--Anthony deMello
User avatar
Malia
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 1606
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2004 12:55 am
Location: Washington State, USA

Postby Saturn » Sun Feb 18, 2007 11:08 pm

What is this book about?
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
Saturn
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 3940
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:16 am

St Augustine's Conversion

Postby bard of passion » Mon Feb 19, 2007 6:55 am

St. Augustine's Conversion is the final book of four on the Confessiones. Wills translates from the Latin (the historian who once studied to be a priest) and this slim volume is Book 8 of St Augustine's massive tome.

The note re Keats references this passage on page 61: "Men cultivate their pleasures, not taking them as they come, spontaneously and unplanned, but after deprivations arranged on a plan. Pleasure in food and drink is provoked by prearranged hunger or thirst, as when drunkards eat salty things to dry up their mouths."

Wills has a great introduction to St Augustine in the Penguin Lives series.

He tends to quote Keats quite a bit in his other, more 'modern' books (such as 'Certain Trumpets' and 'Lincoln at Gettysburg').
"I can see!" cried the blind man, as he picked up the hammer and saw.
bard of passion
 
Posts: 52
Joined: Thu Jan 18, 2007 7:00 am
Location: san luis obispo, ca

Postby Saturn » Mon Feb 19, 2007 2:47 pm

Oh I know all about St Augustine and the Confessions I'm an Ancient History graduate...

I thought it was one of those modern novels with a title that has nothing to do with the actual content of the book :oops:

I always ask the stupid questions :oops:
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
Saturn
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 3940
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:16 am


Return to Keats around the world

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests