Be humbled of each favored word for the intellect to applaud

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Will the word poesy be in the film,"Bright star"?

Poll ended at Tue May 11, 2010 7:38 pm

yes
3
100%
no
0
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Total votes : 3

Be humbled of each favored word for the intellect to applaud

Postby jamiano » Sun Mar 02, 2008 2:35 pm

Information regarding English translations of the lyrical poetry of

Simon Gregorcic,1844-1906,the Slovene poet and Roman Catholic

priest would be kindly embraced. His poem,

"I am not allowed to bless you"

appears fruitful for exploration.





peace to love,

jamiano


p.s.

A reflective sensual Keats,
"I cry your mercy...".

I enjoy all the posts.

Be humbled of each favored word, for the intellect to applaud.

A fancy cheer of poesy towards
Jane Campion for her epic monument ahead, the movie,
"Bright Star".

Who is the musical
composer for the movie?

Has anyone viewed, "I know where I am going"?
This post WW2 English movie about the nature of
romance, on a Scottish Isle, is a lyrical and visual classic.
Last edited by jamiano on Mon Mar 03, 2008 1:57 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Postby dks » Sun Mar 02, 2008 6:56 pm

You know, jamiano...I rather liked Anne Hathaway and James McAvoy in "Becoming Jane." I know some critics didn't in comparison to the recent big screen adaptations of Austen's novels...but their chemistry was powerful in its understated quality, I thought. She's quite breezy to watch--never letting engulfing intensity pepper her acting--even her accent...it's light and, in some scenes, barely detectable, but she never lets go of her poise...that is her strong point--she's got a quiet composure that charms inextricably--and probably some of the most expressive eyes in cinema today. And McAvoy--well...let me say, that he lent that role so much passion and off-played her diffidence in such a superb manner, that the whole thing works--the director must have had them practice staring at eachother--because it's those scenes that you can literally feel happening between them; his piercing blue eyes and her dark dark brown ones. It doesn't grab you by the heart all the way through like the adaptations do, rather there's an end scene that literally had me place my head in my hands and weep...it sucker punches you out of nowhere...

:oops: Sorry for the review--it just so happens I watched it for the first time last night!
"I am certain of nothing but the holiness of the heart's affections and the Truth of Imagination."
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Postby Malia » Mon Mar 03, 2008 2:17 am

I watched Becoming Jane in the theatre when it came out here and I have to admit, I wasn't too terribly impressed by this movie. I think part of the reason is because I think Anne Hathaway is just too pretty to be Jane Austen! It doesn't ring true to me at all. My other concern about the movie (ok, aside from that *somewhat* shallow comment about Ms. Hathaway's looks, :lol: ) is that the movie presented several "false stops". I was all ready for the show to end four times before it actually came to a conclusion. It felt almost like a long-running sermon and I was ready to leave after 1-1/2 hours. James McAvoy gave a great performance, and the energy between him and Hathaway could not be denied. But again, I guess I just couldn't see such a romance ever having happened to the real Jane Austen--it just seemed too fictionalized for my tastes. I had a hard time suspending my disbelief. I must admit, I am somewhat prejudiced against the kind of hero-worship of Jane Austen. Her books are fine, her subject matter is fairly interesting, her novels translate fantastically into film. . .but I'm personally more a fan of the Brontes ;)
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