Random Keats Sightings

Events that are related to Keats, lectures, new publications. Also your Photos of Keats-related locations, events etc.

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Postby dks » Wed Jan 16, 2008 8:13 pm

Malia wrote:That is so cool, dks! I don't remember hearing Hugh Grant make that statement in Bridget Jones' Diary. And, dude, if it was a quote that focused on Keats, you'd think I'd remember it! :lol:

Good to know 'ol Harry Potter is a Keats fan ;) He is certainly at the age when a passion for Keats can take hold. I found that my interest in Keats reached its peak in my early to mid 20's. And, although I certainly think Keats is for all ages, there's something about being in your 20's and Keats. . .maybe it is because that's the age he was when he grappled with his life's questions.


I don't know...I think it was Bridget Jones's Diary--but I'm not sure...yes...I met him when I was 17...I fell head over heels...
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Postby Malia » Wed Jan 16, 2008 8:43 pm

Another Keats sighting! Although Keats was not the focus of the article below, the Keats-Shelley Memorial Museum is pictured. The article is all about an artistic stunt that was carried out at the Spanish Steps in Rome. Personally, I think Keats would have loved it!

Here's the article (and here you'll see the picture, as well):

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/22684229/
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Postby Malia » Thu Feb 14, 2008 4:27 am

hello
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Postby Malia » Thu Feb 14, 2008 4:29 am

hello
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Postby Saturn » Thu Feb 14, 2008 5:15 pm

:?: :?: :?: :?:
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
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Postby Malia » Thu Feb 14, 2008 5:56 pm

:) :lol: Ok, no, I have not gone crazy. I hooked up my new computer for the first time last night and tried to get connected to the internet--I was able to get to this site and every time I tried to make a comment, I was told by my computer to type in my keychain password (whatever that is!). Anyway, those posts were tests on my part--I still can't properly connect to the internet on my new home computer. The reason I have a new computer? I spilled coffee on my old laptop that I had been using and ruined it in one go. *sigh* Well, now I have a brand new IMAC to take its place and once I get the kinks worked out, I think it will be a great little 'puter.
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Postby Saturn » Thu Feb 14, 2008 10:04 pm

:lol: That's okay Malia, I was a bit puzzled by that....

Computers and coffee definitely do not mix.

I've nearly done the exact same thing myself numerous times.
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Postby AsphodelElysium » Fri Feb 15, 2008 9:19 pm

Okay, this was interesting. I was looking for "When I have fears that I may cease to be" for a project I was working on and I kept coming across the poem labeled as song lyrics. Apparently there is a woman/group (I'm not sure which I've never listened to them) by the name of Aesma Daeva that has put this sonnet to music. It is, incidently, from their first album "Here lies one whose name was writ in water." Sounds terribly familiar doesn't? Just thought I would share. :D
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Postby Malia » Fri Feb 15, 2008 10:22 pm

Wow, that is cool, AE! Do you have a link to them singing the song? I've only heard Keats put to music once or twice. . .and both times his poetry was sung in an operatic style that did not work *at all*. In fact, I have never heard Keat's work successfully set to music. I believe this is because Keats, himself, worked hard--and in a very conscious way--to create poetry that had a musical cadence of their own (he did this through word choice, inter-rhyme, assonance and consonance). That is why his works have such a great "mouth feel" to them when spoken aloud. And it is also why his poems rarely--if ever--"work" when set to music. It's as if Keats and the composer are singing two different songs--tunes that conflict with one another.

Now, I have heard Emily Dickinson's poems set to music and they work *fabulously*--especially with very modern, strange and dissonant tones.

I have also sung choral renditions of Yeats's poetry with great success, back in my undergrad days :) But never Keats. I'd love to find a singer/group that can make it work.
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Postby AsphodelElysium » Fri Feb 15, 2008 11:34 pm

Malia,

I think the group is a symphonic speed metal band. That is the best I can gather from the wiki article, the band's website, and listening to a few songs. I don't have a link to anything they've done of Keats's, but here is a link to their MySpace page. Its interesting, to say the least. I like speed metal, but I think I would like this better if she would just go ahead and scream, instead of going for the operatic. Anyway, here's the link, such as it is.

http://www.myspace.com/aesmadaeva
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Postby Malia » Thu Apr 10, 2008 4:14 pm

Here's a random Keats sighting from the Writer's Almanac for today, April 10, 2008:

It was on this day in 1925 that F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel The Great Gatsby was published. (books by this author) Fitzgerald was 28 years old at the time. He'd just produced a play called The Vegetable (1923), which was a big flop. So he sailed with his wife, Zelda, to France in May of 1924. He found that he could see America better from a distance, and he began to write his novel about a wealthy bootlegger named Jay Gatsby, who wears pink suits and throws extravagant parties and is obsessed with winning back the love of his life, Daisy Buchanan.

Fitzgerald worked on the novel every day that summer, writing in pencil, drinking Coca-Cola and gin, and reading Keats whenever he needed inspiration.
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Postby dks » Sat Apr 19, 2008 11:10 pm

Malia wrote:Here's a random Keats sighting from the Writer's Almanac for today, April 10, 2008:

Fitzgerald worked on the novel every day that summer, writing in pencil, drinking Coca-Cola and gin, and reading Keats whenever he needed inspiration.


Actually...Fitzgerald (one of my very favorite American authors) loved Keats--he wrote a short missive about Keats's genius use of verbs citing the first stanza of Eve of St. Agnes--"the hare limped trembling through the frozen grass..." he posited that it's the masterful use of verbs and action words that help make great poetry--if I can find that letter he wrote, I'll post it--it's an excellent critical comment with regard to the genre across the board...also in St. Agnes in stanza XXX in the bedchamber where Madeline sleeps Porphyro begins taking out heaps of beautifully colored and sumptuously described fruits and "jellies"-- in Gatsby--Jay does the very same thing in front of Daisy (Madeline) on the bed in his bedroom--he takes out heaps of beautiful silk shirts--all colored the color of tasty fruits and melons--like watermelon colored, plum, green apple, and brown cinnamon-colored silken men's shirts...the scenes mirror each other remarkably...I think it rather an honoring allusion on Fitzgerald's part--not to mention quite brilliantly rendered within the framework of the story...

How is everyone?? I've missed this place--I've been buried in grad school while on the dangerously hectic homestretch...I'm two weeks shy of turning in my thesis!!! :shock: I graduate in less than 4 weeks...bought my cap and gown the other day...I just may miss the chaos of grad school....nah. :lol:

Hope you are still interested in reading my thesis--I'll be glad to post it in parts in the coming weeks as it's finally done...
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Postby jamiano » Sun Apr 20, 2008 8:21 pm

dks wrote:
Malia wrote:Here's a random Keats sighting from the Writer's Almanac for today, April 10, 2008:

Fitzgerald worked on the novel every day that summer, writing in pencil, drinking Coca-Cola and gin, and reading Keats whenever he needed inspiration.


Actually...Fitzgerald (one of my very favorite American authors) loved Keats--he wrote a short missive about Keats's genius use of verbs citing the first stanza of Eve of St. Agnes--"the hare limped trembling through the frozen grass..." he posited that it's the masterful use of verbs and action words that help make great poetry--if I can find that letter he wrote, I'll post it--it's an excellent critical comment with regard to the genre across the board...also in St. Agnes in stanza XXX in the bedchamber where Madeline sleeps Porphyro begins taking out heaps of beautifully colored and sumptuously described fruits and "jellies"-- in Gatsby--Jay does the very same thing in front of Daisy (Madeline) on the bed in his bedroom--he takes out heaps of beautiful silk shirts--all colored the color of tasty fruits and melons--like watermelon colored, plum, green apple, and brown cinnamon-colored silken men's shirts...the scenes mirror each other remarkably...I think it rather an honoring allusion on Fitzgerald's part--not to mention quite brilliantly rendered within the framework of the story...

How is everyone?? I've missed this place--I've been buried in grad school while on the dangerously hectic homestretch...I'm two weeks shy of turning in my thesis!!! :shock: I graduate in less than 4 weeks...bought my cap and gown the other day...I just may miss the chaos of grad school....nah. :lol:

Hope you are still interested in reading my thesis--I'll be glad to post it in parts in the coming weeks as it's finally done...






Here's a verse from Shelley's "Ozymandias", which I admire for structured content:


"Tell that its sculptor well those passions read"




Percy Bysshe Shelley



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Postby Credo Buffa » Tue Jun 03, 2008 4:05 am

There's a Keats reference in the new Sex and the City movie, of all places. I have to wonder what our favorite poet would think if he knew that his name would be dropped in such a context. :P
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Postby dks » Tue Jun 03, 2008 11:44 pm

Credo Buffa wrote:There's a Keats reference in the new Sex and the City movie, of all places. I have to wonder what our favorite poet would think if he knew that his name would be dropped in such a context. :P


I know one thing--he'd be ogling that Kristin Davis--she's just his type of look--the sable brown hair and light eyes...innocent on the outset, yet a bit flirty--1/2 Alice Jennings and 1/2 Fanny Keats (his mum)... :!:

I know whenever I hear his name--it's like a bell...I have conditioned response! :lol:
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