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Re: Random Keats Sightings

PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2013 2:36 am
by Raphael
Ha yes I agree with you there Ennis!

Re: Random Keats Sightings

PostPosted: Fri Feb 01, 2013 1:20 pm
by Cath
I normally don't tell people my dreams because apparently it's boring (although personally I find dreams and what they can tell us fascinating!), but since Keats played a role last night I thought I'd risk boring you all with it. So: for some reason in my dream I had a small white dog - he was very young, almost a new-born - whom I named Keats. The dog was lying on my chest, extremely lethargic and near-death because I didn't have any water for it. My grandfather (who is dead) was standing outside a shop with a glass in his hand but it was vodka or something - in any case I couldn't give it to Keats, my dehydrated dog, to keep him alive. Eventually in panic I or someone else got some water from a shop and Keats survived. Later I was swimming under water and the white dog was again lying on my chest somehow. The water moved in waves and I was worried the dog had drowned because we were submerged for so long, but then a wave came and we could gasp for air. I saw that little Keats was alive. I even woke up calling his name!!

Re: Random Keats Sightings

PostPosted: Fri Feb 01, 2013 9:05 pm
by Cybele
Cath, should we all have a go at analysing your dream? (The following is completely off-topic!)
My theory about dreams is that they are our bodies' attempts at defragging our biological C-drives (our brains) and we (since we arehumans who attempt to impose order on our often random world) proceed to try to make sense of things. That's not to say we can't gain insight via our dreams. (After all we can gain insight, and bits of wisdom from tea leaves and --for those so inclined :( -- from goat guts and other things.) My guess would be you were worried about not having enough of something followed by being worried about having too much of the same thing.

Now, someone please tell me about why I keep having a recurring dream about having forgotten my passport when trying to cross the US/Canadian border. (I cross the border fairly frequently and have never even come close to forgetting my passport. I've never even had any trouble at the border. Go figure!)

Somewhat less facetiously, I'd say your having a sweet little puppy named Keats might be a variation on women wanting to "mother" the poet. I'm thinking of Mrs. Reynolds, Maria Dilke and Mrs. Bently (sp?) John & Tom's landlady before Tom's death. All of these women seemed to care about the young John Keats in a maternal sort of way.

Re: Random Keats Sightings

PostPosted: Thu Mar 14, 2013 1:02 am
by Ennis
From Stephen Kings's Dumas Key:

Art gallery owner to artist: "Throw out your mean words, Mr. Fremantle. Art should be a place of hope, not doubt. And your doubt rises from inexperience, which is not a dishonourable thing. Listen to me. Will you listen?"

Artist to gallery owner: "Sure, that's why I came."

Gallery owner: "When I say truth, I mean beauty."

Gallery owner's assistant: "John Keats. Ode On a Grecian Urn. 'All we know, all we need to know.' And oldie but still a goodie." (my underscore and bold type.) And to think, this is out of Stephen King, of all the authors out there . . . .

Re: Random Keats Sightings

PostPosted: Wed Apr 24, 2013 12:32 pm
by Cybele
The Keats Shelley House tweeted this:
http://mlb.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd ... b&c_id=mlb

Re: Random Keats Sightings

PostPosted: Sat Apr 27, 2013 8:51 pm
by BrokenLyre
So I and my wife were attending the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra to hear some Mahler's Adagio from Symphony #10 and Mozart's Requiem. As I looked through the Program, I noticed a short article explaining something about Mahler's work and Mozart's piece. As I read the article on Mozart I learned that he actually died writing his Requiem. At the very end of the article, the writer closed the somber piece with "Darkling, I listen; and for many a time I have been half in love with easeful death, Called him soft names in many a mused rhyme...Now more than ever seems it rich to die."

Of course, I was surprised. Made my night to see our friend in print at such a venue.

Re: Random Keats Sightings

PostPosted: Sat Apr 27, 2013 10:46 pm
by Raphael
That sounded a great night Broken Lyre!

Re: Random Keats Sightings

PostPosted: Fri May 31, 2013 12:33 am
by Saturn
My local (and virtually the only decent second hand bookstore left in Belfast) has changed its name to "Keats & Chapman".

Re: Random Keats Sightings

PostPosted: Fri May 31, 2013 5:28 pm
by Malia
Excellent! :) I wish we had a Keats bookstore here. The only decent 2nd hand store I know of is a place called "Second Look Books"--cute, but not Keats ;)

Re: Random Keats Sightings

PostPosted: Sat Jun 01, 2013 10:53 pm
by Cybele
It will take a few days to stop laughing from this. Earlier today I was searching using a certain unnamed search engine for a new utility sink for the laundry room. Then, shortly before dinner, I again used this certain search engine looking for a recipe for left-over couscous. Well -- this certain search engine sends its users targeted ads in an attempt to sell them things the certain search engine thinks they might be interested in.

A little ad popped up with this (screen shot):
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Not that I'm about to spend almost $400 on a utility sink, I *had* to check out the website. :)

Re: Random Keats Sightings

PostPosted: Sat Jun 01, 2013 11:46 pm
by Raphael
How odd! I wonder if he would have liked a sink like that LOL.

Re: Random Keats Sightings

PostPosted: Sun Jun 02, 2013 2:02 am
by Cybele
Oh, Raphael, I'd be willing to bet just about anybody living in the early 19th century would have welcomed indoor plumbing with hot and cold running water.

Re: Random Keats Sightings

PostPosted: Fri Jun 07, 2013 6:07 am
by Cybele
Raphael, you might be familiar with this blogger, but I couldn't resist this retweet from the K-S House:

http://fannycornforth.blogspot.co.uk/2013/06/pre-raphaelite-bazaar.htm

Re: Random Keats Sightings

PostPosted: Wed Aug 14, 2013 8:01 pm
by Cybele
A random Keats-influenced sighting: Daniel Pinkwater writes wonderful kids' books. He's also a prtty good essayist. Several years ago, he did short pieces -- mostly his little essays -- on NPR. One was (obviously) one of my favorites. I kept looking for it on line, but was unsuccessful. Then, a couple of weeks ago, I bought the Kindle version of his book, "Fish Whistle." And, what do you know? There was the essay, "On First Looking into Kurtzman's Mad." (This essay dealt with having his eyes opened to the glories of satirical cartooning, etc., through the pages of Mad magazine. The book (paper and digital) is available through Amazon (and presumably brick & mortar bookstores, too.)
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