MLA Abstract

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MLA Abstract

Postby dks » Wed Mar 21, 2007 4:41 am

Here is my abstract for a presentation I will give on April 14th at my univ. in front various PhDs. :shock:

This is the rough beginning and overall scope of my thesis:

One could think of the Romantic poets as ‘hurricanic’—gale-force impact, with relatively short life spans. But if there was ever a deflection of natural pattern, a true Coriolis effect among the rainbands, it was Keats—the last and foremost of them.

Keats’s power of perception will be the umbrella topic of discussion for this thesis. Underneath this sweeping canopy all the various multitudes of influences and imprints which surrounded the poet will be examined along with specific works—these include his two most lush odes—Nightingale and Autumn, Eve of St. Agnes, and Endymion. Clarke’s Academy and its tremendous influence on Keats’s life, disposition, cognitive development (namely his ability to absorb and process language), and social orchestrations is a major factor which will be canvassed while examining and discussing Keats’s self-harvested poetic genius. Finally, there will be a conclusion with regard to Keats’s uncanny brand of perceptivity manifested through imagery; it is the proposal that Keats was a true synaesthete (with an emphasis on taste/color and lexical-gustatory Synaesthesia—first really tapped while at Clarke’s).

There is ample evidence to support these determinations by analyzing the works themselves and probing deeply into Keats’s life ‘pre-poesy.’ Although a comprehensive and somewhat abstruse angle, this is one not too acutely mined in any one, previous biography, there is little information with regard to Keats’s school days and late teenage years; however, these years mark the derivations of the poet’s subsequent, rapid onslaught of poetic mastery—a subject worth exploring in attempt to answer Robert Browning’s intriguing question: “What porridge had John Keats?”


I became very excited over researching synaesthesia with regard to Keats--I'm a lex-gust syn myself and although it is a useless trait which will never afford me fame or fortune, it is one that obviously pervaded Keats's life at profound, dithering levels--hence his poetry. :wink:
Last edited by dks on Wed Mar 21, 2007 6:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: MLA Abstract

Postby adonais » Wed Mar 21, 2007 6:54 am

dks wrote:But if there was ever a deflection of natural pattern, a true Cariolis effect among the rainbands

I'm guessing you meant "Coriolis" here (or at least, I'm unfamiliar with "Cariolis"). To my simplistic mind, that metaphor feels a bit strained, but I'll grant you it sounds good ;)
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Postby Saturn » Wed Mar 21, 2007 10:34 am

Interesting.

I'm not sure what you mean by Cariolis either Denise :?

Also I would question your assertion that Keats was the last Romantic poet, that the era died along with him. Not everyone would agree Keats was the foremost poet either, some would say Shelley or even Wordsworth.

I suppose you mean that of the second generation of Romantics; Byron, Shelley etc. Keats was the foremost in our/your estimation today?

Byron's masterwork Don Juan was still in progress at the time of Keats death and some of Shelley's very finest works had yet to be written by 1821 before his death a year later.

Coleridge lived [and wrote; however sporadically] for another decade
while Wordsworth lived until 1850.

Not to mention the countless 'minor' poets who continued on the Romantic tradition all the way down to the Victorian era.
Even that arch-Victorian Tennyson's early works some regard as Romantic and of course the Pre-Raphaelite poets and painters were suffused with high Romanticism and medieval fervour that you can argue Keats was the first to exploit in his work which in turn influenced the likes of Rossetti.

Far be it from me to dictate what you should say but take this in mind: do not let your partiality to Keats blind you to the wider reality of the times and literature of the period.
Much as we all love Keats and put him above all others on this site, in the academic world this partisanship will be questioned rigorously.

Forgive me my rather harsh criticism :?
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Re: MLA Abstract

Postby dks » Wed Mar 21, 2007 5:56 pm

adonais wrote:
dks wrote:I'm guessing you meant "Coriolis" here (or at least, I'm unfamiliar with "Cariolis"). To my simplistic mind, that metaphor feels a bit strained, but I'll grant you it sounds good ;)


Sorry--fast and sloppy typing--yes, it should be Coriolis. Strained it may very well be. I came up with it in about an hour, since that is all I had to work with--the dean of my program was merciless and pressed me into presenting--when he didn't see my name on the list of presenters initially, he emailed me and wanted an instantaneous abstract. Thing is, by being persistent, he inadvertantly helped me put into perspective where I want to go with it once I put pen to paper--realize I only have until the end of the next summer session to finish it--that would be round about July 6th. I wanted to share it with my forum-ite, Keats devotees. I always value everyone's feedback--you knew I would toss back some kind of disclaimer, though, didn't you? :wink:
Last edited by dks on Wed Mar 21, 2007 6:13 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby dks » Wed Mar 21, 2007 6:09 pm

Saturn wrote:Interesting.

I'm not sure what you mean by Cariolis either Denise :?

I suppose you mean that of the second generation of Romantics; Byron, Shelley etc. Keats was the foremost in our/your estimation today?

Far be it from me to dictate what you should say but take this in mind: do not let your partiality to Keats blind you to the wider reality of the times and literature of the period.
Much as we all love Keats and put him above all others on this site, in the academic world this partisanship will be questioned rigorously.

Forgive me my rather harsh criticism :?


Well, yes, of course I meant the second generation Romantics. And I cleared up Coriolis in my former post.

Your criticism is not harsh. I value it. But it is my job to make such proposals in a thesis such as the one I'm writing. It is simply an opening hook (strained metaphor and all :wink: ) for the abstract. I am not attempting to argue the point that Keats is the very best poet above and beyond all the others. My paper direction and scope are stated explicitly in the second paragraph.

I should merely be thankful you read it. :oops:
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Re: MLA Abstract

Postby adonais » Thu Mar 22, 2007 1:30 am

dks wrote:Sorry--fast and sloppy typing--yes, it should be Coriolis. Strained it may very well be. I came up with it in about an hour, since that is all I had to work with--
...
I always value everyone's feedback--you knew I would toss back some kind of disclaimer, though, didn't you? :wink:

Oh I just thought you should be aware of its somewhat dubious meaning, in case someone asked you to explain or defend it. Assuming you know what the Coriolis effect is (a fictitioius force only observed from within a rotating reference frame), the way you described Keats as " a deflection of natural pattern" must be read as if the rest of the world was revolving around itself, so that when Keat tries to walk a straight line away from it, everybody else sees his curved path as some curious bending of the natural ways. Hmm. Maybe that actually does work as a metaphor? Well anyway, I was thinking that in reality, it was probably the other way around, with Keats doing pirouettes in situ and the world looking on.
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Re: MLA Abstract

Postby dks » Thu Mar 22, 2007 3:05 am

adonais wrote:
dks wrote:Sorry--fast and sloppy typing--yes, it should be Coriolis. Strained it may very well be. I came up with it in about an hour, since that is all I had to work with--
...
I always value everyone's feedback--you knew I would toss back some kind of disclaimer, though, didn't you? :wink:

Oh I just thought you should be aware of its somewhat dubious meaning, in case someone asked you to explain or defend it. Assuming you know what the Coriolis effect is (a fictitioius force only observed from within a rotating reference frame), the way you described Keats as " a deflection of natural pattern" must be read as if the rest of the world was revolving around itself, so that when Keat tries to walk a straight line away from it, everybody else sees his curved path as some curious bending of the natural ways. Hmm. Maybe that actually does work as a metaphor? Well anyway, I was thinking that in reality, it was probably the other way around, with Keats doing pirouettes in situ and the world looking on.


Yes...as in the way he's viewed now through modern sensibilities. Certainly during his lifetime he was not doing 'pirouettes in situ', as you mention, but rather he was more like some cyclonic genius--a tornado of rapid poetic development and genius of perception--trying to figure out in which direction his art would take him...so many "hours marked by tragedy" and in a race against the clock of untimely death.

Let me take Keats away from atmospheric science, since I mercilessly placed him there. I'm splitting hairs with you, Adonais. For this I apologize. The horse is dead. The metaphor just didn't work... :oops: :lol: But I promise my intentions--though nebulous--were rooted in a semblance of erudition and good intentions... :lol:
Last edited by dks on Thu Mar 22, 2007 2:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Saturn » Thu Mar 22, 2007 10:19 am

Sorry again for my rant Denise I kind of got carried away with my own thoughts regardless of what you actually had written - I tend to do that which is why I never wrote good essays :oops:

I think I was just in the mood for an argument and that doesn't happen often :roll:

I'm sure your presentation, your thesis will be great don't listen to me :oops:
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Postby dks » Thu Mar 22, 2007 2:47 pm

Saturn wrote:Sorry again for my rant Denise I kind of got carried away with my own thoughts regardless of what you actually had written - I tend to do that which is why I never wrote good essays :oops:

I think I was just in the mood for an argument and that doesn't happen often :roll:

I'm sure your presentation, your thesis will be great don't listen to me :oops:


Nonsense. I asked for your feedback and you gave it to me. I needed to hear that--I need to hear whatever comes my way with regards to this thesis--it is a large undertaking--and I will be presenting on April 14th! :shock:

Any feedback, conjectures, notions, ideas, praise, huzzah ( :wink: )is all appreciated and probably much needed. Besides, sister can stand up for herself...I can argue back, you know...it may be all fluff and jazz, but I can really extend my self expression when I really need to. :wink:
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Postby darthoutis » Fri Mar 23, 2007 2:15 am

Very good, Denise. As we've discussed before, I agree with you that Keats demonstrates a keen power of perception in his writing, moreso than many other poets, perhaps due to his medical training. Such a detailed perception of his is what no doubt empowers his creative genius.

One stupid question: did you invent the label "pre-poesy" to describe Keats' early life, or is that a term from one of his critics (I won't include you in the class of critics, since I know all you think we do is kill rainbows)?

I've submitted my abstract to the research committee, too (on Milton, of course). I tried to keep it as plain as possible (this is very hard for a Baroque personality like me). I don't think I succeeded at the endeavor, though, because of all the philosophical language I had to use, but I don't like writing abstracts anyway, so puh. Tell me what you think.

John Milton’s simultaneous embrace of the “inner light” and his unorthodox theory of material monism produces some tension, to say the least, in his philosophical outlook. On one hand, Milton says that God created “all from one first matter,” typifying his belief that matter and spirit are the same substance. Yet in line 587 of the final book of Paradise Lost, Michael advises Adam to cultivate “the paradise within thee, happier farr” than the paradise on earth. This line arguably connotes a second notion of spirit in its implications that is poised differently from its metaphysical counterpart. Milton's interior paradise of Protestant individualism is akin to St. Augustine’s interior proof of God, for Milton is speaking outside the delimiters of space and time; he is speaking epistemologically. Spirit, under this context, then, is not a retrograde form of matter but is an ontological substance that exists apart from matter. So in other words, Milton seems to be holding on to two contradictory schemes in his philosophy, substantial dualism and material monism. To reconcile this conflict, I will propose the simplest explanation possible, that Milton just forgot that the traditional operation of abstraction is incompatible with his more innovative theory of material monism. I will account for this philosophical oversight by citing Milton’s heritage of Cambridge Neo-Platonism, which he was never able to entirely repudiate in his later years of life when writing Paradise Lost.

And on a side note, I highly recommend William Riley Parker's _John Milton: A Biography_ for a venerable account of Milton's life. He shows a lot of sympathy for Milton--a hard feat to accomplish for someone living in an age when Milton is (inaccurately) vilified as an icon of Puritanism--and I was almost brought to tears in the chapter about the death of Milton's infant son.

EDIT: And did I ever tell you, Denise, that I finished my thesis! I feel so liberated!
What though the field be lost?
All is not lost; the unconquerable Will,
And study of revenge, immortal hate,
And courage never to submit or yield:
And what is else not to be overcome?
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