How Keats shows Romantic traits in his writings???

BEFORE you post a request for help concerning study assignments or research papers here , PLEASE check with the SEARCH ENGINE above to see if there's already a thread on the subject.

Moderators: Saturn, Malia

How Keats shows Romantic traits in his writings???

Postby Stoney » Mon Mar 29, 2004 1:21 am

I have a paper over Keats that shows his romantic traits in his life through his writings. I have to prove that he was a true romantic of his time. I could really use some help there is so much stuff to look through. Any suggestions??
Rachael
Stoney
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Mar 29, 2004 1:10 am

Postby Neelima Nair » Thu Nov 18, 2004 9:33 am

oh coool :o
«O Sorrow,
Why dost borrow
The natural hue of health, from vermeil lips? -.....
WAtya wanna know?
Neelima Nair
 
Posts: 13
Joined: Wed Nov 17, 2004 10:42 am
Location: Uae

You should prove the opposite!

Postby MonroeDoctrine » Wed Dec 08, 2004 3:01 am

Keats is clearly the exact opposite of ROMANTIC! He's lying by saying he's a Romantic. Why did Lord Byron attack Keats? It's because he did something Romantics hate!

Keats does something with his writing which is clear i.e he wants people reading to go outside of the domain of simple sense perception. That's why most of his poems are about the subject of truth and beauty; completely abstract ideas which are in the domain of thinking as suppose to feeling. Most Romantics never discuss thought; however simple sensual discriptions are the basis of the Romantic Poets. You can understand what I mean by comparing Byron to Keats. Look a little closer
Peace
User avatar
MonroeDoctrine
At Parnassus' foot
 
Posts: 187
Joined: Mon Mar 01, 2004 8:11 am

Don't forget

Postby MonroeDoctrine » Wed Dec 08, 2004 3:04 am

Don't forget that one of his friends went to jail for some of the things he was publishing (Leigh Hunt) which is a key indication that they were doing something different than the typical Romantic
Peace
User avatar
MonroeDoctrine
At Parnassus' foot
 
Posts: 187
Joined: Mon Mar 01, 2004 8:11 am

Postby Wickers_Poet » Mon Feb 14, 2005 3:07 am

I think Keats is much more of a Romantic poet than Byron could ever be.
Wickers_Poet
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Sun Mar 28, 2004 8:41 pm
Location: London - England

Postby Fred » Tue Apr 12, 2005 12:18 pm

actually he shows some traits that are not romantic but classist because in many of his poems he ends up finishing with reason.

Like for instance lamia's imaganery(sorry about spelling) "snake" world is destroyed by apollonius's philosphy and in ode to a nitingale he says somthing like fansy cannot decive so well as she is famed to do ... so really he seems not to like imagination that much
on the other hand there is his imagery love of nature and use of mythology that is pure romantisim
Fred
 
Posts: 53
Joined: Tue Apr 12, 2005 9:10 am
Location: Cloud Cuckoo land... for the time being

Postby Steen » Tue May 31, 2005 12:18 am

Going back to Lamia, he states that "do not all charms fly at the touch of cold philosophy"
So while thought CAN distory dream he asks what is better, to live a blessful lie or a dull, true life?
That is a part of the Romantic dilema
You don't love a women because she is beatiful, she is beatiful because you love her.
Steen
 
Posts: 80
Joined: Sun Feb 13, 2005 12:26 am
Location: Oxfordshire

Postby girl » Mon Jun 06, 2005 9:29 pm

The thing to remember about Romanticism however is that is wasnt a strict set of rules, they dont have a simple philosophy, reality is more complex and confusing than any order that the poet might create. I think this is true of Keats, he is very ambigious - if he wasnt we would not be discussing the validity of so many different interpretations, but rather we would all be convinced of one.
The emphasis on the imagination shows how it is the mind which is of central importance in Romanticism, they were moving away from the physicality of Classicism which dealt only with the external, with what could be seen. And it is true that Keats was engaged with what he thought and felt about things - a prime example being "Ode to a Grecian Urn" Keats uses the technique of anthropomorphism to allow the poem concern with the metaphysical aspects of the Urn.
girl
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Mon Jun 06, 2005 8:20 pm

Postby Steen » Fri Jun 10, 2005 10:36 pm

The reason that it is ambigous is, in my humble opinion, is because romantisim cannot follow lines and laws like a logical lifestyle. It is bascaly do-what-you-feel-but-don't-forget-to-keep-you-eyes-open-to-the-world stance!
If he told us what to think it wouldn't be much of a way to make us follow our own feelings would it?
You don't love a women because she is beatiful, she is beatiful because you love her.
Steen
 
Posts: 80
Joined: Sun Feb 13, 2005 12:26 am
Location: Oxfordshire


Return to Help and Homework

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron