Who was Richard Woodhouse?

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Who was Richard Woodhouse?

Postby vinegar_tom » Thu Dec 30, 2004 10:12 am

Hi, I have been asked to analyse an excerpt of one of Keats' letters.

Specifically, this one addressed to Richard Woodhouse:

http://www.john-keats.com/briefe/271018.htm

It would really help my answer if I could state [i]who[/i] Mr Woodhouse was; his relationship to Keats, his profession etc.

Does anyone know this information?

Furthermore, I have been asked to comment on Nature in Keats. I understand this is a big topic, but where would people recommend I start? I will probably look at Ode to a Nightingale, Ode to Autumn, To Solititude.

A more offbeat work would probably impress whoever read my paper.

Many thanks for taking the time to read this.

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Postby Saturn » Thu Dec 30, 2004 11:24 am

Here's what it says in Keats The Major Works (Oxford World's Classics):

Richard Woohouse (1788-1834) Scholar, liguist (he produced a Grammar of the Spanish, Portugese and Italian Languages in 1815) and lawyer. He was legal and literary adviser to Taylor and Hessey (Keats' publishers). The date of his meeting with Keats is uncertain but he greatly admired the 1817 book of poems and Endymion and devoted much time and assiduity to his scholarly collection of Keatsiana (for which all readers and students of Keats owe him a debt of gratitude). He was an immensely kind and generous friend to Keats, and in August 1819 gave him £50 to be presented in the form of an advance from his publishers. He wrote to Taylor that "Whatever people [say they] regret that they could not do for Shakespeare or Chatterton, because he did not live in their time, that I would embody into a Rational principle, and...do for [Keats]." Taylor described him as "abstemious to a remarkable degree, of great industry, averse to pleasure (in the Londonn acceptation of the word)...reads much, and with the strictest attention...extremely attentive to religious duties...and possesses more real humanity than...any one I know."

Hope this helps.
Last edited by Saturn on Thu Dec 30, 2004 9:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Despondence » Thu Dec 30, 2004 1:51 pm

Stephen Saturn wrote:and in August 1819 gave him £50 to be presented in the form of an advance from his publishers
Keats never actually knew that the money came from Woodhouse, did he? Keats and money in general is a sad story in its own right; to think what might have been different if someone like Woodhouse had managed the Keats inheritance instead of Abbey..
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Postby Saturn » Thu Dec 30, 2004 9:41 pm

I don't know if he knew that it was Woodhouse who gave him the money, but many small kindnesses like that by friends are what kept him afloat in very pressing times.

IF Woodhouse had have managed Keats affairs doubtless he would have found about the inheritence from his grandmother I think it was which he and his siblings never recieved.

So many if's and but's....
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
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