Adams dream...

BEFORE you post a request for help concerning study assignments or research papers here , PLEASE check with the SEARCH ENGINE above to see if there's already a thread on the subject.

Moderators: Saturn, Malia

Adams dream...

Postby sheddy15 » Sat Jun 24, 2006 12:16 am

Gosh i feel like im abusing all your help...im asking another question.... could anyone explain to me (in simple terms!) what exactly Keats means by "adams dream"? I read somewhere a quick version of it and i cant find it again now... am i right in thinking that in adams dream he was dreaming about eden...and awoke to find Eve?? OR is it that every dream must end and we must face reality?
As Byron said, "Poetry is the expression of excited passion, and there is no such thing as a life of passion any more than a continuous earthquake, or an eternal fever" so is it more so to do with this kind of idea, of facing reality after imaging??
as u can tell i really have no idea... thanku!
x
sheddy15
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Tue Jun 20, 2006 9:01 pm

Re: Adams dream...

Postby Malia » Sat Jun 24, 2006 12:36 am

sheddy15 wrote:Gosh i feel like im abusing all your help...im asking another question.... could anyone explain to me (in simple terms!) what exactly Keats means by "adams dream"? I read somewhere a quick version of it and i cant find it again now... am i right in thinking that in adams dream he was dreaming about eden...and awoke to find Eve?? OR is it that every dream must end and we must face reality?
As Byron said, "Poetry is the expression of excited passion, and there is no such thing as a life of passion any more than a continuous earthquake, or an eternal fever" so is it more so to do with this kind of idea, of facing reality after imaging??
as u can tell i really have no idea... thanku!
x


Now I don't know for *sure* about this, but I'd say it has something to do with Keats's ideas about the connection between imagination and truth. He said at one point (I paraphrase) that what the imagination siezes as truth must be truth. So, in this illustration, Adam imagines his Eve and when he awakes, finds her in truth there. His imagination helped to make her real--or it at least played a large part in helping Adam grasp what truth already existed within him and only had to be imagined to be made real and clear to the conscious mind. I think a similar thing could be said about how the imagination helps an artist to grasp the truth and beauty that lies within him so that he can express it to the world.
Stay Awake!
--Anthony deMello
User avatar
Malia
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 1606
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2004 12:55 am
Location: Washington State, USA

Re: Adams dream...

Postby Malia » Sat Jun 24, 2006 12:36 am

Malia wrote:
sheddy15 wrote:Gosh i feel like im abusing all your help...im asking another question.... could anyone explain to me (in simple terms!) what exactly Keats means by "adams dream"? I read somewhere a quick version of it and i cant find it again now... am i right in thinking that in adams dream he was dreaming about eden...and awoke to find Eve?? OR is it that every dream must end and we must face reality?
As Byron said, "Poetry is the expression of excited passion, and there is no such thing as a life of passion any more than a continuous earthquake, or an eternal fever" so is it more so to do with this kind of idea, of facing reality after imaging??
as u can tell i really have no idea... thanku!
x


Now I don't know for *sure* about this, but I'd say it has something to do with Keats's ideas about the connection between imagination and truth. In this illustration, Adam imagines his Eve and when he awakes, finds her in truth there. His imagination helped to make her real--or it at least played a large part in helping Adam grasp what truth already existed within him and only had to be imagined to be made real and clear to the conscious mind. I think a similar thing could be said about how the imagination helps an artist to grasp the truth and beauty that lies within him so that he can express it to the world.
Stay Awake!
--Anthony deMello
User avatar
Malia
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 1606
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2004 12:55 am
Location: Washington State, USA

Postby dks » Sat Jun 24, 2006 12:46 am

Keats is referring to "Paradise Lost" when Adam lies "dreaming" about Eve being created from his rib.

Keats means that residing in an imaginative world means emersing oneself in another form of awareness--one derived from wish-fulfillment...but is actuality because it is on somewhat of a divine, otherworldly plane. He states in a letter to Benjamin Bailey-November 22 1817:

"...Adam's dream will do here and seems to be a conviction that Imagination and its empyreal reflection is the same as human Life and its spiritual repetition..."

You can read the rest of the letter and get a better, honed in idea of exactly what he means--read the above qotation a few times until you find yourself examining it closely--for that is Keats's untutored philosophies at marvelous work...they creep up like a vine and then wrap around you as you slowly begin to realize what brilliance you are beholding... :wink:

I hope this sheds some light...
"I am certain of nothing but the holiness of the heart's affections and the Truth of Imagination."
User avatar
dks
Dante
 
Posts: 1469
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2006 6:14 am
Location: Texas

Postby Malia » Sat Jun 24, 2006 12:51 am

Thanks for the facts, dks! :) You're right in that it is important to read and re-read Keats (both his poetry and his letters) in order to really grasp his depths. Richard Woodhouse, the first real Keatsian, was one of the earliest to recognize that fact. :)
Stay Awake!
--Anthony deMello
User avatar
Malia
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 1606
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2004 12:55 am
Location: Washington State, USA

Postby dks » Sat Jun 24, 2006 12:57 am

Ahh, yes! Miss Malia--I had hit the submit button when you were sending your response--very well said--I you tie it in with the poetic process and that is, I think, right on the money.

My response was nebulous--you pared it down nicely, Malia--sheddy, you should have plenty to work with here. :wink:
"I am certain of nothing but the holiness of the heart's affections and the Truth of Imagination."
User avatar
dks
Dante
 
Posts: 1469
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2006 6:14 am
Location: Texas

Postby sheddy15 » Sat Jun 24, 2006 12:57 am

ahh my new english teachers, thank u very much!! its slowly all becoming clearer now : ) x
sheddy15
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Tue Jun 20, 2006 9:01 pm

Postby dks » Sat Jun 24, 2006 1:02 am

:?

That'll be cash, check or charge, Sheddy? :wink:
"I am certain of nothing but the holiness of the heart's affections and the Truth of Imagination."
User avatar
dks
Dante
 
Posts: 1469
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2006 6:14 am
Location: Texas

Adams dream and LA BELLE DAME SANS MERCI

Postby jasonw » Thu Sep 07, 2006 2:15 am

This is no doubt a "dead" topic now but I just came across it (and this forum) while browsing google for "Adams dream". The line suddenly popped into my head today and it obviously does go straight to the heart of this great poet, though in a way that is difficult to put into words. I've also just reread LA BELLE DAME SANS MERCI, where there is reference to the knight's "latest dream" from which he wakes "on the cold hill side": the dream seems to cause a paralysis ("And this is why I sojourn here / Alone and palely loitering") - its power is undeniable, but there seems doubt in Keats' mind whether this power is beneficial or unhealthy...probably he was undecided (as would befit the coiner of the phrase "negative capability"). If imagination is powerful enough to become truth then surely the person possessing it is going to experience doubts about normal distinctions and definitions,
especially that of subject / object. In prelapsarian Eden maybe this does not matter so much, but in the fallen world it may be a cause for concern, both for the writer and for the reader (various lines of Keats keep nagging me from time to time, maybe for this reason?). Does anyone else find these lines disturbing the more they think about them? (NB Paralysis is a common characteristic of dreams: so when the knight wakes at the end and finds himself immobile it is as if the dream continues in another form - which might relate again to the dream / truth notion)
jasonw
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Sep 07, 2006 1:24 am


Return to Help and Homework

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests