Mozart music used in Bright Star

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Mozart music used in Bright Star

Postby Raphael » Sun Jun 27, 2010 4:31 pm

I found the serenade on you tube:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0mYUMctF ... re=related

It was played on radio 3 this afternoon and I loved the whole version, so thought I'd look it up. Enjoy the bassoon! :wink:
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Re: Mozart music used in Bright Star

Postby Cybele » Sun Jun 27, 2010 5:49 pm

Hmm. I think the Serenade may also have been used in the movie "Amadeus." (And I think that's why I bought the CD a hundred or so years ago. I love the clarinet part in it as well as our Bassoon!)
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Re: Mozart music used in Bright Star

Postby Raphael » Sun Jun 27, 2010 5:55 pm

Cybele wrote:Hmm. I think the Serenade may also have been used in the movie "Amadeus." (And I think that's why I bought the CD a hundred or so years ago. I love the clarinet part in it as well as our Bassoon!)



It was also in Amadeus yes. I'm not keen on that film though- Mozart is portrayed a bit manic! That crazy laughter.. :roll:
Now the Beethoven one....brilliant! Seen clips on you tube- I must try and rent the DVD.
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Re: Mozart music used in Bright Star

Postby Saturn » Sun Jun 27, 2010 8:38 pm

Amadeus, the play and the film were not supposed to be biographies of Mozart, more of a story about the nature of genius, and mediocrity, Amadeus is a wonderful film, a true classic but no-one thinks it's a true account of Mozart's life; it's more about Salieri anyway.

As for 'the Beethoven one' as you say Raphael, do you mean Immortal Beloved, with Gary Oldman? If so, I thoroughly recommend it, a much underrated film; again takes many liberties with Beethoven's life but it captures the essence of the man without a doubt, Gary Oldman's performance is astonishing.
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Re: Mozart music used in Bright Star

Postby Malia » Sun Jun 27, 2010 8:56 pm

I second your comments about Immortal Beloved, Saturn. Gary Oldman absolutely inhabits his character--beyond amazing. And I thought the way they brought the Ode to Joy to life at the end of the film (seeing much of it through Beethoven's "memory" of his childhood) was spot-on Romantic. If I had to explain literary Romanticism to anyone, I would have them watch that scene!
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Re: Mozart music used in Bright Star

Postby Saturn » Sun Jun 27, 2010 9:07 pm

Absolutely, that whole scene, with the flashbacks and the music and the heartbreaking poignancy of Beethoven having to be turned around the hear the audience's applause [a real incident] is pure Romanticism, and the 9th itself with it's progress from the Dark Ages anarchy of the first movement to the unbridled joy of the fourth is almost the perfect embodiment of the philosophy of liberal enlightenment thought.
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Re: Mozart music used in Bright Star

Postby Raphael » Sun Jun 27, 2010 9:49 pm

Amadeus, the play and the film were not supposed to be biographies of Mozart, more of a story about the nature of genius, and mediocrity, Amadeus is a wonderful film, a true classic but no-one thinks it's a true account of Mozart's life; it's more about Salieri anyway.


I know...but the way Mozart was portrayed was like a :x joke.


As for 'the Beethoven one' as you say Raphael, do you mean Immortal Beloved, with Gary Oldman? If so, I thoroughly recommend it, a much underrated film; again takes many liberties with Beethoven's life but it captures the essence of the man without a doubt, Gary Oldman's performance is astonishing.


Yes, that's the one.He was made to look very like Beethoven.
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Re: Mozart music used in Bright Star

Postby Cybele » Sun Jun 27, 2010 9:51 pm

I agree with Saturn -- I've viewed "Amadeus" not so much as a biopic but as a commentary on life, society, creativity and, in the case of Salieri, insanity.

I remember hearing an academic gas on for what seemed like an eternity about historical inaccuracies and the fact that period instruments weren't used. (Don't worry, folks. I did all the eye-rolling necessary! :roll: :roll: :roll: :lol: ) I'd say he definitely missed the "point" of the movie.

And "Immortal Beloved" -- Oh my! I get goosebumps thinking about the scene where Beethoven can't hear the audience's applause. (Ok. So I -- and about half the population of this planet -- get goosebumps just hearing the 9th, never mind that it was a great flick on top of it.)
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Re: Mozart music used in Bright Star

Postby Saturn » Sun Jun 27, 2010 11:35 pm

Raphael, Mozart had an enormous sense of fun and humour, particularly scatological humour and if you read his letters the portrayal in the film is not far off some of the things he wrote to his wife, he delighted in wordplay and 'dirty' jokes. I think the point of the film was that it was Mozart as seen through Salieri's eyes - the bookends at the beginning and ending of the film make clear that the story is being told through his remembrances, and in his eyes Mozart was unworthy of the divinely inspired talent that was bestowed upon him, whereas he, Salieri, was a devout believer in God until he was put out by the idea that God had given this talent to someone HE saw as a buffoon and a clown, and his jealousy on this point drives the whole narrative, and the fictional idea that Salieri commissioned the famous Requiem from him in order to claim it as his own after Mozart's death so he could be attributed with a share of that divinely ordained musical brilliance that he saw so clearly in Mozart, but lacked himself.
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Re: Mozart music used in Bright Star

Postby Raphael » Mon Jun 28, 2010 12:00 am

That was insightful Saturn- he told dirty jokes ? :lol: I always thought of him as serious.
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Re: Mozart music used in Bright Star

Postby Pjerrot » Mon Jun 28, 2010 12:11 am

Thanks for the link... The music is just a bit dense for my taste -- I will also admit that I'm not much of a Mozart fan. Saturn's comment about the composer's humor brings to mind the dirty commentary in the first horn concerto (wikipedia has it).
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Re: Mozart music used in Bright Star

Postby Saturn » Mon Jun 28, 2010 7:08 am

Raphael wrote:That was insightful Saturn- he told dirty jokes ? :lol: I always thought of him as serious.


Absolutely, of course he had a serious side to him, the man wasn't so incredibly talented and prodigious without being a very hard worker and dedicated to his profession, but he did have a very playful side.
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Re: Mozart music used in Bright Star

Postby Pjerrot » Mon Jun 28, 2010 2:00 pm

Saturn wrote:
Raphael wrote:That was insightful Saturn- he told dirty jokes ? :lol: I always thought of him as serious.


Absolutely, of course he had a serious side to him, the man wasn't so incredibly talented and prodigious without being a very hard worker and dedicated to his profession, but he did have a very playful side.


It seems that not only Mozart but Haydn and Beethoven too had well-developed senses of humour. Much of the music from the Enlightenment/Classical period is simply fun to listen to.
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