Is this a Keats "Sighting?"

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Is this a Keats "Sighting?"

Postby BrokenLyre » Sat Nov 12, 2011 11:35 pm

Ok...gotta make the confession... but this will only be understood by true Keats lovers.... I think.

My wife and 7 year old daughter were sitting at the kitchen table. I was sleeping on the couch when my daughter started calling to me from the kitchen. My daughter said, "Dad!..dad look, dad! dad! dad! dad! Dad look!" But I never heard her and she got no response from me.

Then she said "Keats!" and I immediately said "What?" And she and my wife laughed. She then said, "Dad! I called you seven times and you never heard me???!! You're so weird!"

It's an internal Keats sighting. And yes, it happens frequently that I don't hear my own name. But I always respond when I hear "Keats." My subconscious is always on the alert for a Keats sighting I guess. You understand, even if my family doesn't.
"Come... dry your eyes, for you are life, rarer than a quark and unpredictable beyond the dreams of Heisenberg; the clay in which the forces that shape all things leave their fingerprints most clearly. Dry your eyes... and let's go home."
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Re: Is this a Keats "Sighting?"

Postby Raphael » Sun Nov 13, 2011 1:52 am

:lol:
That might be a better alarm clock for you than a clock itself!
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: Is this a Keats "Sighting?"

Postby Ennis » Wed Nov 23, 2011 2:53 am

BrokenLyre wrote:Ok...gotta make the confession... but this will only be understood by true Keats lovers.... I think.

My wife and 7 year old daughter were sitting at the kitchen table. I was sleeping on the couch when my daughter started calling to me from the kitchen. My daughter said, "Dad!..dad look, dad! dad! dad! dad! Dad look!" But I never heard her and she got no response from me.

Then she said "Keats!" and I immediately said "What?" And she and my wife laughed. She then said, "Dad! I called you seven times and you never heard me???!! You're so weird!"

It's an internal Keats sighting. And yes, it happens frequently that I don't hear my own name. But I always respond when I hear "Keats." My subconscious is always on the alert for a Keats sighting I guess. You understand, even if my family doesn't.


Great, great story, Brokenlyre!! It's up to us all to "teach" the younger generation about John Keats and it seems as though your seven-year-old is learning her "lessons" well!!
I know I've probably "told" this story about my now five-year-old grandson, Aidan, but he knows Keats. He likes me to recite "Ode To a Nightingale" as he falls asleep (excellent lullaby, wouldn't you agree!?); he likes "Ode to Autumn," and when I read it to him, he always asks if Keats is writing about a real person -- I suppose the second and third stanzas confuse him; it is kind of difficult to explain allegory/metaphor to one so young! What's really funny (if that's the correct adjective to use, and I'm not too sure it is . . .), is that he likes the film Bright Star, but he can't seem to get it through his little brain that Bright Star was not Fannie's name! His favourite part is when, to use his words, "Bright Star finds out Keats is dead and she walks in the snow, crying, and saying that poem out loud to herself." Oh, to be young (and innocent [?])again. . . . He wants to know if I'll take him to "Linden" the next time I go. My hope for Aidan is that he will never forget Keats and will eventually hold him as close in his heart as we all do. And if I have anthing at all to do with it, he won't and he will!
"But if you will fully love me, though there may be some fire, 'twill not be more than we can bear when moistened and bedewed with Pleasures." JK to FB 08.07.1819
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Re: Is this a Keats "Sighting?"

Postby Cybele » Thu Nov 24, 2011 4:53 am

And Ennis, I've been reciting the first few lines of "Endymion" to my one-year old grandson who has a medical condition that often makes his breathing noisy and labored. Even though his condition is much improved, the words about a "sleep Full of sweet dreams and health and quiet breathing" always seem to comfort him and is now a part of his bedtime ritual. I like to think our guy would be pleased by this as he believed in the healing power of poetry.
"The philosopher proves that the philosopher exists. The poet merely enjoys existence."
Wallace Stevens
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Re: Is this a Keats "Sighting?"

Postby Ennis » Thu Nov 24, 2011 7:06 pm

Cybele wrote:And Ennis, I've been reciting the first few lines of "Endymion" to my one-year old grandson who has a medical condition that often makes his breathing noisy and labored. Even though his condition is much improved, the words about a "sleep Full of sweet dreams and health and quiet breathing" always seem to comfort him and is now a part of his bedtime ritual. I like to think our guy would be pleased by this as he believed in the healing power of poetry.


Cybele,

Of course Keat5s would be most pleased. Remember how he "wanted to do some good on this world."
I hope your little grandson will recover (or improve); I know what it's like to agonize over the health of a child. My son, Hunter, who
is now almost 30, has severe hemophila. Believe me, I know what it's like to spend many an endless,agonizing nights with a child in pain and not being anle to do a damn thing anout it.
My thought are much with you.
"But if you will fully love me, though there may be some fire, 'twill not be more than we can bear when moistened and bedewed with Pleasures." JK to FB 08.07.1819
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Re: Is this a Keats "Sighting?"

Postby Raphael » Sun Dec 04, 2011 1:50 am

Aw they are moving posts ladies. Best wishes to Aidan, Hunter and Cybele's grandson. x
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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