Page 1 of 1

The house time forgot

PostPosted: Fri Feb 07, 2014 5:19 pm
by Raphael
Oh how sad...look at the organ and piano- beautiful, dusty and silent...:-[


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... sage-field

Re: The house time forgot

PostPosted: Fri Feb 07, 2014 5:44 pm
by Saturn
Fascinating!

And a disgrace, how could the former home of one of the greatest poets in the English language be left to moulder into dust like this, where the hell are the National Trust? :evil:

Re: The house time forgot

PostPosted: Fri Feb 07, 2014 6:03 pm
by Raphael
Saturn wrote:Fascinating!

And a disgrace, how could the former home of one of the greatest poets in the English language be left to moulder into dust like this, where the hell are the National Trust? :evil:


I know! I would love to see the Trust or English Heritage restore it. Too many old houses are left to crumble.

Re: The house time forgot

PostPosted: Fri Feb 07, 2014 6:40 pm
by Ennis
Haunting, fascinating; I would love to ramble through those books!

Re: The house time forgot

PostPosted: Mon Feb 10, 2014 4:39 pm
by Cybele
Phooey. The link wouldn't work for me. Are there any other links about this house?

Re: The house time forgot

PostPosted: Mon Feb 10, 2014 7:40 pm
by Saturn

Re: The house time forgot

PostPosted: Sat Feb 15, 2014 2:57 am
by Cybele
Thanks, Saturn. Your link worked.
The photos are beautiful. The rooms are hauntingly desolate, kind of Havisham-like.
This reminds of a house near where I live. It was built in the early 19th century by the first (or one of the first) non-indigenous family in town. It had very graceful lines, elegant fan shaped windows on the end-gables, and sat very near the main water supply reservoir for a nearby large city. Over the years, ownership changed many times and ultimately the title to the land was so muddled that no one could figure out who exactly owned it. It had been broken into countless times and vandalized. To top it off, it was widely believed to be haunted. It was in terrible shape and the cost to rehab it would have been outrageous. Finally, and reluctantly, the county and city governments tore it down.

Even closer to our house, there was a building once owned by the Abolitionist, John Brown, and used as a leather tannery. Again, the building was in horrible shape. The owner was willing to sell it to the city and/or the local historical society. (The historical society was in its infancy and had ridiculously limited resources.) After an unbelievable amount of hemming and hawing on the part of the city and the historical society, the owner pulled the building down. The space where the building once stood is now part of a modest city park.

The point I'm trying to make is that it's impossible to save every old building. We may be sentimental about them, but nothing is permanent. Everything changes.
(Speaking of John Brown and by way of an example, his family's homestead still stands, but has been remodeled so many times that the Brown family would never recognize it. The church where he stood up and said he was dedicating his life to the abolition of slavery is now a Yoga center. (The Yoga folks take very good care of the building and have wonderful programs there.) A few blocks from my house, the church where Brown had the impudence to take some black people to worship and was shown the door as a result? Well that's now the home of an engineering firm that designs dry-cleaning equipment.

Yup. Everything changes. Nothing lasts forever, everything is ephemeral when you get down to it. We preserve what we can and deem valuable. The other things, we just have to let go.

Re: The house time forgot

PostPosted: Sat Feb 15, 2014 8:23 am
by Saturn
I guess, even in my own city they demolished the house where Seamus Heaney lived for many years which wasn't a mansion or great piece of architecture like this place, we can't save them all I know! but surely the name of Milton should be revered enough to help save this fascinating time capsule.

Re: The house time forgot

PostPosted: Sun Feb 16, 2014 12:23 pm
by CasaMagni
Yup. Everything changes. Nothing lasts forever, everything is ephemeral when you get down to it. We preserve what we can and deem valuable. The other things, we just have to let go.


The pyramid of Caius Cestius has already stood for over two thousand years, maybe it will last 'forever' :wink:

Re: The house time forgot

PostPosted: Tue Mar 11, 2014 6:39 pm
by Raphael
And Stonehenge!