Music recommendations

Discussion of other topics not necessarily Keats or poetry-related, i.e. other authors, literature, film, music, the arts etc.

Moderators: Saturn, Malia

Postby Malia » Thu May 17, 2007 10:33 pm

I think that some time in the past, we got into a conversation about what music we have in our CD players (at home, work, or in the car). Well, I've been listening to my old favorite, Simon and Garfunkel, a lot in the car lately and boy--talk about memory lane. Of course, I wasn't even *alive* when they were making records, but they are an absolutely solid part of my growing-up years. When I was about 10 years old, I was flipping through some albums my aunt had given us a few years before--along with her old record player--and came across "Sounds of Silence". I popped on the record, settled the needle down on the spinning album and was immediately transported. From that moment on for some years, S&G was my favorite group and they are still like "mac & cheese" to me. Their songs contain such poetry--they were part of what inspired me to become an English major and delve into literature. Anyway, all that info. is preface for this question: What singer/group/composer influenced your childhood and youth and what was his or her impact on your life?

Before I go. . .here's an example of the poetry of Paul Simon's "Simon and Garfunkel" music that still inspires me today:

Old Friends, Old Friends
Sat on their park bench like bookends
A newspaper blown through the grass
Falls on the round toes
Of the high shoes
Of the old friends
Old friends,
Winter companions
The old men
Lost in their overcoats
Waiting for the sun to set.
The sounds of the city sifting through trees
Settle like dust
On the shoulders
Of the old friends.
Can you imagine us years from today
Sharing a park bench quietly?
How terribly strange to be seventy.
Old friends,
Memory brushes the same years
Silently sharing the same fears . . .

A time it was
And what a time it was
It was
A time of innocence
A time of confidences
Long ago it must be
I have a photograph
Preserve your memories
They're all that's left you.
Stay Awake!
--Anthony deMello
User avatar
Malia
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 1606
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2004 12:55 am
Location: Washington State, USA

Postby Saturn » Thu May 17, 2007 10:37 pm

I love the Graduate soundtrack!!! Simon and Garfunkel were probably the best singer-songwriter team of the 60s beside Lennon/McCartney.

I used to detest them in my teenage rebellion stage as old fogey music that my Dad listened to but I've come to really appreciate their stuff as I've got older.

T Graduate movie is brilliant too - Dustin Hoffman's character is soooo me [well apart from the granny sex haha!!].
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
Saturn
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 3939
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:16 am

Postby Credo Buffa » Thu May 17, 2007 11:37 pm

Saturn wrote:Simon and Garfunkel were probably the best singer-songwriter team of the 60s beside Lennon/McCartney.

Whaddaya mean "of the 60s"? How about ever?!
"Holy Kleenex, Batman! It was right under our nose and we blew it!"
User avatar
Credo Buffa
Lamia
 
Posts: 935
Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2005 1:42 am
Location: Minnesota

Postby Saturn » Fri May 18, 2007 9:41 am

Well in that genre certainly you're probably right. I'm trying to think of many other great songwriting partnerships as close...maybe Jagger Richards, Page/Plant [Led Zeppelin] and although I'm not much a fan Bernie Taupin/Elton John but my personal 'modern' favourite songwriting duo is Bono and The Edge. 8)
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
Saturn
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 3939
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:16 am

Postby Credo Buffa » Fri May 18, 2007 1:05 pm

I just love how, going through "Old Friends/Bookends" that Malia posted up there, you can easily read Simon and Garfunkel lyrics as poetry in and of themselves. Then when you add the music, they become even better. They just have a brilliant knack for knowing exactly where to place the words in time and within a melodic line, and for creating text painting that isn't cheesy, but very nuanced and effective. For example, there's a lyric in "The Dangling Conversation"--

Like a poem poorly written,
We are verses out of rhythm,
Couplets out of rhyme,
In syncopated time


--where the words "syncopated time" are accompanied by a brief echo which is actually a syncopated rhythm. Although it's not a terribly subtle move and could come out sounding kind of silly in the wrong hands, it actually works extremely well in this context. I didn't even notice it the first. . . I don't know. . . twenty times I listened to it, probably because I was so absorbed in the story and atmosphere of the lyrics that it hadn't occurred to me that the "syncopated time" in the poetry they are singing about is translated as "syncopated time" in the music as they are singing it. You can just imagine the look on my face when I discovered that!

But I totally agree with you, Malia, that Simon and Garfunkel have a transportative quality about their music. I too have been listening to them as long as I can remember. "The Boxer" has always been one of my absolute favorite songs, and I've only come to appreciate it more and more as I've gotten older and the lyrics have become increasingly poignant
"Holy Kleenex, Batman! It was right under our nose and we blew it!"
User avatar
Credo Buffa
Lamia
 
Posts: 935
Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2005 1:42 am
Location: Minnesota

Postby Saturn » Fri May 18, 2007 1:13 pm

My favourite track of theirs is probably America 8)

Let us be lovers,
We'll marry our fortunes together.
I've got some real estate
Here in my bag.

So we bought a pack of cigarettes,
And Mrs. Wagner's pies,
And walked off
To look for America.
"Kathy", I said,
As we boarded a Greyhound in Pittsburgh,
Michigan seems like a dream to me now.

It took me four days
To hitch-hike from Saginaw.
"I've come to look for America."

Laughing on the bus,
Playing games with the faces,
She said the man in the gabardine suit
Was a spy.

I said, "Be careful,
His bow tie is really a camera."
"Toss me a cigarette,
I think there's one in my raincoat."
We smoked the last one
An hour ago.

So I looked at the scenery,
She read her magazine;
And the moon rose over an open field.
"Kathy, I'm lost", I said,
Though I know she was sleeping.
"I'm empty and aching and
I don't know why."

Counting the cars
On the New Jersey Turnpike
The've all come
To look for America,
All come to look for America,
All come to look for America.
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
Saturn
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 3939
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:16 am

Postby Malia » Fri May 18, 2007 2:44 pm

America and The Boxer are two of my faves, also. There are so many tunes to love in their songbook. Of course, one of my absolute faves is Bridge Over Troubled Water. I've decided that if I ever get a boat, I'm going to name it the "Silver Girl" ;)

Sail on Silver Girl
Sail on by
Your time has come to shine
All your dreams are on their way. . .

Credo, the Syncopated time comment you made is really fascinating. I'd never thought about that, either. Of course, I never really knew what syncopated time meant :lol: but now I'll listen to that song in a new way.

On a seriously practical level, one of the reasons I truly love S&G is because I can sing harmony with Garfunkel when I listen to them. His voice is high enough for me to reach the notes and I love the harmonies these guys came up with. (I sang alto in choir back in college and so sang quite a lot of harmony.) And I've always thought that S&G were an almost perfect match harmonically. Simon is kind of flat and boring on his own (at least voice-wise) and Garfunkel is almost too high and angelic all by himself (although I like his voice better alone than I like Simon's alone), but together? Amazing! They balance each other out perfectly.

OK, enough of my slobbering homage to Simon and Garfunkel! :lol: I'm glad I'm not alone in my love for their music, though!
Stay Awake!
--Anthony deMello
User avatar
Malia
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 1606
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2004 12:55 am
Location: Washington State, USA

Postby Heaven/Hell » Wed May 23, 2007 12:14 pm

I adore Simon & Garfunkel. My favourite tune of theirs is 'The Sound of Silence' easily.
But someone mentioned greatest songwriters of the 60s - I think we're all forgetting Dylan here. And Van Morrison. 'Sweet Thing' in particular - pure poetry. 8)
"Language has not the power that Love indites: The Soul lies buried in the ink that writes" ~ John Clare
Heaven/Hell
At Parnassus' foot
 
Posts: 155
Joined: Wed Apr 18, 2007 3:26 pm
Location: London, UK

Postby Saturn » Wed May 23, 2007 2:24 pm

We were talking about songwriting partnerships.

Dylan of course is legendary but he's a solo artist.
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
Saturn
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 3939
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:16 am

Postby Heaven/Hell » Thu May 24, 2007 1:34 pm

:oops: My bad. It's been so long since I've been here, I just kind of 'skimmed' off the top of the conversation to get an insight, like one would skim the whipped cream off a nice mug of hot chocolate to eat before drinking it.
"Language has not the power that Love indites: The Soul lies buried in the ink that writes" ~ John Clare
Heaven/Hell
At Parnassus' foot
 
Posts: 155
Joined: Wed Apr 18, 2007 3:26 pm
Location: London, UK

Postby Heaven/Hell » Thu May 24, 2007 1:40 pm

To make amends for my earlier lack of foresight, here's some cool lyrics, to one of my favourite songs of all time - Sweet Thing by Van Morrison.

I will stroll the merry way and jump the hedges first
And I will drink the clear clean water for to quench my thirst
And I shall watch the ferry-boats and they'll get high
On a bluer ocean
Against tomorrows sky
And I will never grow so old again
And I will walk and talk
In gardens all wet with rain

Oh sweet thing, sweet thing
My, my, my, my, my sweet thing

And I shall drive my chariot down your streets and cry
Hey, its me, I'm dynamite
And I dont know why
And you shall take me strongly
In your arms again
And I will not remember that I even felt the pain.
We shall walk and talk
In gardens all misty and wet with rain
And I will never, never, never grow so old again.

Oh sweet thing, sweet thing
My, my, my, my, my sweet thing
And I will raise my hand up into the night time sky
And count the stars that's shining in your eye
Just to dig it all and not to wonder
That's just fine
And I'll be satisfied not to read in between the lines
And I will walk and talk
In gardens all wet with rain
And I will never, ever, ever, ever grow so old again.
Oh sweet thing, sweet thing
Sugar-baby with your champagne eyes
And your saint-like smile....
"Language has not the power that Love indites: The Soul lies buried in the ink that writes" ~ John Clare
Heaven/Hell
At Parnassus' foot
 
Posts: 155
Joined: Wed Apr 18, 2007 3:26 pm
Location: London, UK

Postby Saturn » Thu May 24, 2007 1:50 pm

I still wonder how Van Morrison is such grumpy git yet he makes such great music :lol:

:roll:

One of my tenuous claims to fame is that an aunt of mine used to sing backing vocals for Van Morrison in the early 60s when he was just starting out as a young man in Belfast.

She says he was a sourpuss even then :lol:
Last edited by Saturn on Thu May 24, 2007 2:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
Saturn
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 3939
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:16 am

Postby Heaven/Hell » Thu May 24, 2007 2:16 pm

LOL, I have his seminal album Astral Weeks...despite his genius he did strike me as a rather sullen figure, but I just assumed he was trying to hit a pose for the cover and look 'miserably cool', a la Dylan. I guess he wasn't posing.

Image
"Language has not the power that Love indites: The Soul lies buried in the ink that writes" ~ John Clare
Heaven/Hell
At Parnassus' foot
 
Posts: 155
Joined: Wed Apr 18, 2007 3:26 pm
Location: London, UK

Postby Saturn » Thu May 24, 2007 2:30 pm

No his grumpiness is legendary believe me :lol:
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
Saturn
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 3939
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:16 am

Postby Malia » Thu May 24, 2007 2:37 pm

He looks like he has a migrane in that album cover picture. . .

You guys mentioned Bob Dyllan--I agree, he is an amazing songwriter--but he cannot sing. The only song I can really manage listening to when he's singing it is, "Like a Rolling Stone". Everything else? Forget it! But man, every single time I've heard someone *else* sing a Dyllan song, I've loved it. His songs are excellent. His voice? Not so much. What I'd like to find is an album of Dyllan covers--you know, other artists singing from his songbook. Does anyone know if such an album exists and if it is available for purchase?
Stay Awake!
--Anthony deMello
User avatar
Malia
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 1606
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2004 12:55 am
Location: Washington State, USA

PreviousNext

Return to Miscellaneous

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

cron