April is National Poetry Month Post Your Faves!

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April is National Poetry Month Post Your Faves!

Postby Malia » Fri Apr 13, 2007 5:37 pm

Here in the States, April is officially National poetry month! :) So, in honor of the season, I've changed my avitar to something poetic and literary inspired :lol: and I suggest we celebrate this season by posting a favorite poem to this thread. Of course, anything by Keats is more than welcome! I have a few good ones in my poetry books at home so I'll post one when I have access to them. When you post a poem, let us know a little bit about why it inspires you. Does it create an unforgettable image? Did you read it at a turning point in your life (and associate it forever with that time/event)? Let us know. It's time to celebrate poesy!! :)
Stay Awake!
--Anthony deMello
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Postby Credo Buffa » Fri Apr 13, 2007 6:59 pm

I came across this poem by Robert Penn Warren when searching for something for a little early evening poetry reading for one of my lit classes in college. I can't remember exactly what I was supposed to be looking for in my selection of a poem, but this one caught me immediately through the rich, aural color of the language; it really is a poem that demands to be read out loud. Since then, it has been a definite favorite of mine.


Mortal Limit


I saw the hawk ride updraft in the sunset over Wyoming.
It rose from coniferous darkness, past gray jags
Of mercilessness, past whiteness, into the gloaming
Of dream-spectral light above the lazy purity of snow-snags.

There--west--were the Tetons. Snow-peaks would soon be
In dark profile to break constellations. Beyond what height
Hangs now the black speck? Beyond what range will gold eyes see
New ranges rise to mark a last scrawl of light?

Or, having tasted that atmosphere's thinness, does it
Hang motionless in dying vision before
It knows it will accept the mortal limit,
And swing into the great circular downwardness that will restore

The breath of earth? Of rock? Of rot? Of other such
Items, and the darkness of whatever dream we clutch?
"Holy Kleenex, Batman! It was right under our nose and we blew it!"
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Postby Saturn » Fri Apr 13, 2007 10:36 pm

“Godlike the man who
sits at her side, who
watches and catches
that laughter
which (softly) tears me
to tatters: nothing is
left of me, each time
I see her…”
Gaius Valerius Catullus, LI.

The Roman poet Catullus is often quite unfairly derided as a purveyor of cheap porno poems for the plebs but this beautiful poem is the most exquisite description of the feeling one gets when one sees the person one loves. I don't know how it plays in the latin original but this English translation is beautifully, heartbreakingly expressed.

This fragment was featured in the film Jude [based on Thomas Hardy's Jude The obscure] and just hearing those words in the mouth of the hero talking to his beloved Sue moved me to floods of tears - a beautiful, tragic and moving film with many such vignettes of beauty.
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
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Postby Malia » Sat Apr 14, 2007 12:44 am

Here's a poem from one of my FAVORITE living poets, Billy Collins. He really knows how to turn an idea on its head--and he often does so with great and often profound humor. In honor of poetry month, here's a poem about poetry--or more specifically, trying to introduce poetry to students :)

Introduction to Poetry

I ask them to take a poem
and hold it up to the light
like a color slide

or press an ear against its hive.

I say drop a mouse into a poem
and watch him probe his way out,

or walk inside the poem's room
and feel the walls for a light switch.

I want them to water-ski
across the surface of a poem
waving at the author's name on the shore.

But all they want to do
is tie the poem to a chair with rope
and torture a confession out of it.

They begin beating it with a hose
to find out what it really means.
Stay Awake!
--Anthony deMello
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Postby Saturn » Sat Apr 14, 2007 10:39 am

That's great Malia :P
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
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Postby Malia » Sat Apr 14, 2007 6:43 pm

Everyone,
I just discovered on National Public Radio (NPR) that someone has gone and done a Rap tribute to Wordsworth's "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud" so I thought I'd post the link to the story for you all to take a listen. I haven't listened to it yet, but I bet it will be veerrry interesting! :lol:

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/stor ... Id=9585244
Stay Awake!
--Anthony deMello
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Postby Saturn » Sat Apr 14, 2007 9:37 pm

Oh dear I think I'll give that a miss, even for comedy's sake :?
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
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Postby Heaven/Hell » Tue May 01, 2007 2:09 pm

It's not April anymore, but hell, poetry knows not your feeble conceptions of space and time! ;)
One my favourites by the man William Blake:

Never seek to tell thy love,
Love that never told can be;
For the gentle wind doth move
Silently, invisibly.

I told my love, I told my love,
I told her all my heart,
Trembling, cold, in ghastly fears.
Ah! she did depart!

Soon after she was gone from me,
A traveller came by,
Silently, invisibly:
He took her with a sigh.
"Language has not the power that Love indites: The Soul lies buried in the ink that writes" ~ John Clare
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Postby Saturn » Tue May 01, 2007 2:15 pm

I love that one H/H, it's probably my favourite Blake poem :P
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
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Postby Malia » Tue May 01, 2007 2:40 pm

Blake is wonderful, isn't he? My organizational communications professor said more than once during the semester that Blake is his absolute favorite poet--this coming from a businessman, during a business class! Blake permiates all things, it seems :)
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--Anthony deMello
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Postby Saturn » Tue May 01, 2007 9:17 pm

I'm not a huge fan of Blake, or I haven't read that much of his work but some of his shorter poems like this are real gems.
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
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Postby Heaven/Hell » Thu May 03, 2007 1:28 pm

Saturn wrote:I'm not a huge fan of Blake, or I haven't read that much of his work but some of his shorter poems like this are real gems.


His epics are very much disputed and often hard to conceive, but it's his implicitness that I find so endearing. His originality was unequalled. His finest short poems are to be found in Songs of Innocence and Experience.
"Language has not the power that Love indites: The Soul lies buried in the ink that writes" ~ John Clare
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Postby Saturn » Thu May 03, 2007 1:34 pm

I have a great fully illustrated book of the Songs Of Innocence and Experience with reproductions of the original plates :D
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
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Postby Heaven/Hell » Thu May 03, 2007 1:41 pm

Foul tyrant! :lol:
I can't find copies of his illustrated plates anywhere.
His biography by Peter Ackroyd (imaginatively entitled Blake)has one or two.
"Language has not the power that Love indites: The Soul lies buried in the ink that writes" ~ John Clare
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Postby Saturn » Thu May 03, 2007 1:48 pm

This is it:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Songs-Innocence ... 447&sr=1-7

It should be easily available I've seen it everywhere.
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