Thought I'd introduce myself...

Discussion of other topics not necessarily Keats or poetry-related, i.e. other authors, literature, film, music, the arts etc.

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Thought I'd introduce myself...

Postby Heaven/Hell » Fri Apr 20, 2007 2:26 pm

Hello, my fellow poetry lovers!
Like yourselves, I hold the Romantic period in English literature to be the richest, most poetic and most insightful of all literary periods. Keats, Shelley, Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron and Clare; if any of these men individually had featured in any literary period they would have been hailed as stand-out geniuses of course, but for all of them collectively to feature in the same era just blows the mind.
The first poet I 'discovered' was William Blake (hence my username, a play on "The Marriage of Heaven & Hell") after hearing Jim Morrison idolised him, together with hearing some of his quotes in a film, I bought his biography. He was a precociously talented poet from age 14, as well as this a brilliant painter, prose-writer and engraver. From here I naturally moved on to the other Romantics, but the ones I had previously mentioned are my favourites and my favourite poems to get lost in are written by them.
Anyway, I look forward to discussing Keats and poetry in general with all you lovely literati :)
"Language has not the power that Love indites: The Soul lies buried in the ink that writes" ~ John Clare
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Postby Malia » Fri Apr 20, 2007 3:38 pm

Hey there, Heaven/Hell :) Good to have you on the forum and hope to hear from you often. Blake is pretty amazing, isn't he? I think he was way before his time especially as far as artwork is concerned. I must admit, I haven't read much of his work since college but he was fascinating. I think he was probably the greatest of the Romantics in that he was such a genius in so many areas.
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Postby Saturn » Fri Apr 20, 2007 4:37 pm

Welcome Heaven/Hell good to have you aboard :D

I look forward to your contributions.
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Postby Heaven/Hell » Thu Apr 26, 2007 1:28 pm

Thank you both for the kind greetings.
Outside the Romantics I also like Emily Dickinson, Arthur Rimbaud, Rainer Maria Rilke and Emily Bronte.
He wasn't really a poet, but I also picked up a copy of Marcus Aurelius' Meditations and that was very inspiring.
"Language has not the power that Love indites: The Soul lies buried in the ink that writes" ~ John Clare
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Postby Saturn » Thu Apr 26, 2007 1:43 pm

Heaven/Hell wrote:He wasn't really a poet, but I also picked up a copy of Marcus Aurelius' Meditations and that was very inspiring.


Au contraire!!!

It's one of the most beautifully poetic prose works ever written.

I have several different translations.

It's one of my favourite books :P

Philosophy IS poetry, especially the work of the ancient philosophers - you only have to read Shelley on Plato to see why.
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Postby Heaven/Hell » Fri Apr 27, 2007 2:12 pm

Saturn wrote:Philosophy IS poetry, especially the work of the ancient philosophers - you only have to read Shelley on Plato to see why.


Not to mention Shelley's brilliant essay "In Defence of Poetry". Coleridge was also well-read on German idealist philosophy, and the ancient Greek Plotinus.

The German idealist philosopher Schelling once said, "Nature is visible Spirit, Spirit is invisible Nature", which is pure poetry.
"Language has not the power that Love indites: The Soul lies buried in the ink that writes" ~ John Clare
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Postby Malia » Fri Apr 27, 2007 4:11 pm

Heaven/Hell wrote:Thank you both for the kind greetings.
Outside the Romantics I also like Emily Dickinson, Arthur Rimbaud, Rainer Maria Rilke and Emily Bronte.
He wasn't really a poet, but I also picked up a copy of Marcus Aurelius' Meditations and that was very inspiring.


You mention enjoying Emily Bronte--my favorite book is by her sister; Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre. It's kind of funny, but so many of my female friends also consider Jane Eyre to be *their* favorite book. Emily Dickinson is also good, although I admit sometimes her poems elude me. One of my favorite non-Romantic poets is Pablo Neruda; I love his odes to common things (my favorites being his Ode to an Onion and Ode to an Artichoke). :)
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Postby Heaven/Hell » Sat Apr 28, 2007 1:57 pm

Malia wrote:You mention enjoying Emily Bronte--my favorite book is by her sister; Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre. It's kind of funny, but so many of my female friends also consider Jane Eyre to be *their* favorite book. Emily Dickinson is also good, although I admit sometimes her poems elude me. One of my favorite non-Romantic poets is Pablo Neruda; I love his odes to common things (my favorites being his Ode to an Onion and Ode to an Artichoke). :)


I've heard of Pablo Neruda and want to get a copy of his works, but it's hard to find him. If you haven't read any Arthur Rimbaud there is numerous tribute websites to him, but the translations tend to vary. It is worth learning French just to read his and Alphonse de Lamartine's poetry. Rimbaud was yet another tragic young poet who died too early though. :cry:
"Language has not the power that Love indites: The Soul lies buried in the ink that writes" ~ John Clare
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Postby Malia » Sat Apr 28, 2007 4:15 pm

I know this isn't exactly the place to post a poem, but bear with me--considering we're talking about Pablo Neruda and Heaven/Hell hasn't been able to come across his amazing poetry, I want to type up my favorite translation of his Ode to an Onion. It was translated by a Spanish professor at Whitman College where I did my undergrad and it is better than the translation in the printed copy of his poems that I have. (You are right, Heaven/Hell, as with Rimbaud, it is best to read a foreign author's work in his or her native language, but alas languages and I are foreign to eachother! :lol: Translations will have to do. :) ) This translation is excellent, however. Here's a "taste" of Neruda for you:

Ode to an Onion

Onion,
luminous globe,
petal by petal
your beauty was formed;
crystal scales grew within you
and in the secret of the dark earth
your dewy belly grew round.
The miracle
happened underground
and when your heavy green stem
appeared
and your leaves like swords
were born in the garden
the earth drew its power together
to show off your naked transparency,
as the remote sea copied
in Afrodite's breasts
the magnolia;
so the earth
made you
onion,
clear as a planet,
and destined
to shine,
constant constellation
spherical liquid rose
on the table
of the poor.

Generous,
you break your fresh globe
in pieces
for ardent consumation
in the stewpot;
and in the firey heat of the oil
your crystal slivers
curl into feathers of gold.

I also remember your loving
and abundant influence
on salads;
even the sky seems to cooperate
forming you into delicate hail
to celebrate your diced clarity
sprinkled on the hemispheres of a tomato.
But within the reach
of the hands of the common people
bathed in oil
and dusted
with a little salt,
you kill the hunger
of the laborer's hard road.
Guiding star of the poor,
fairy godmother
wrapped
in tissue paper,
you leave the ground
eternal, untouched, pure
the mere seed of a star,
and as the kitchen knife
cuts you
our only painless tears
are shed.
Only you make us cry without sorrow.
Through all my life
I will celebrate you, onion,
for me you are
more beautiful than a bird
with blinding feathers
in my eyes
you are a celestial globe, a platinum goblet,
the rooted dance
of a snowy anemone.
And all the fragrance of the eath
lives within your crystalline heart.

--Translated by Celia Weller.
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Postby Credo Buffa » Sat Apr 28, 2007 4:47 pm

Pablo Neruda is brilliant. A lot of people find some of his imagery a bit jarring (I admit that I've been awakened from the hazy poetic stupor of his work once or twice by this), but the rich language completely overcomes it. He's best if you can read his poems in Spanish, though, naturally. . . or at least have enough knowledge of Spanish to appreciate the sounds of the words, even if you can't necessarily understand them.
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Postby Malia » Sat Apr 28, 2007 5:29 pm

Credo Buffa wrote:Pablo Neruda is brilliant. A lot of people find some of his imagery a bit jarring (I admit that I've been awakened from the hazy poetic stupor of his work once or twice by this), but the rich language completely overcomes it. He's best if you can read his poems in Spanish, though, naturally. . . or at least have enough knowledge of Spanish to appreciate the sounds of the words, even if you can't necessarily understand them.


I can only imagine how wonderful Neruda would be to read--and fully understand--in Spanish. I remember when I took a Hawaiian language course on-line a few years back, I was able to better understand the poetry of Hawaiian music so much more. People generally think of Hawaiian music as "tacky" or only for backyard barbeques, that kind of thing. But the fact of the matter is, good traditional Hawaiian music sung in *Hawaiian* is extremely poetic. The Hawaiian language is poetic by nature and has evolved over thousands of years in order to be that way. For example, back "in the day" before the white man came, if one Hawaiian wanted to visit a friend, he had to sing an impromptu song--basically create poetry on the spot--to ask for admittance. A poetical song is still sung by students of the language and by hula students when they want to gain admittance each day into the classroom.

The Hawaiian language is filled with what they call Kaona--or, hidden meanings. Just as in poetry, Hawaiian music and poetry is written on many, many different levels of meaning. It is so amazing to be able to learn the language and "crack" the code of meaning even just a little bit. :)
Last edited by Malia on Sat Apr 28, 2007 6:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Credo Buffa » Sat Apr 28, 2007 6:16 pm

Wow, fascinating info Malia!
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Postby dks » Sun Apr 29, 2007 5:43 pm

Yes...welcome Heaven/Hell...to our sanctuary.
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Postby Heaven/Hell » Tue May 01, 2007 1:50 pm

Thanks dks.. :D

Funnily enough Malia, I was watching The Simpsons last night, and it was the episode where Bart sells his soul to his mate Milhouse. He is sceptical about the existence of such an entity, believing it is a myth created by the Church, but soon after the sale he has nightmares, his pets growl at him, and he no longer finds anything funny. Lisa tells him, "I think you really did lose your soul... Pablo Neruda said laughter is the language of the soul."
"Language has not the power that Love indites: The Soul lies buried in the ink that writes" ~ John Clare
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Postby Heaven/Hell » Tue May 01, 2007 1:52 pm

Malia wrote:The Hawaiian language is filled with what they call Kaona--or, hidden meanings. Just as in poetry, Hawaiian music and poetry is written on many, many different levels of meaning. It is so amazing to be able to learn the language and "crack" the code of meaning even just a little bit. :)


Ever heard 'Somewhere Over The Rainbow' by Israel Kamikawiwo'ole? One of my favourite all-time songs.
"Language has not the power that Love indites: The Soul lies buried in the ink that writes" ~ John Clare
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