The currently viewing thread...

Discussion of other topics not necessarily Keats or poetry-related, i.e. other authors, literature, film, music, the arts etc.

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Postby Saturn » Wed Oct 17, 2007 2:33 pm

Oh dear, it's not supposed to be that, try this:

Image
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
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Postby Malia » Wed Oct 17, 2007 3:54 pm

Ah, OK now! That cover makes more sense :) Now, what is this movie all about, anyway--something about sci-fi you said? (Forgive me, it is early in the morning here and my brain has been rung out like a dishrag writing a paper for my Psychology of Leadership class :lol: )

Speaking of sci-fi movies, though, I have just gotten into Netflicks--this rent-a-movie-through-the-mail business and today I'm suppoed to recieve a copy of Metropolis--supposedly one of the best silent films ever made. It was made in (I believe) 1925 in Germany and it is a tale about life in, I believe 2020 or 2025. Anyway, from what I've read of the reviews, it's "sci-fi" vision frighteningly accurate in some ways. Should be interesting to watch.
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Postby Saturn » Wed Oct 17, 2007 9:14 pm

Metropolis I've seen bits of, but not all of it. It's a very prescient film for the time it was made, it really was the first true sci-fi movie.

As for Primer it is a low [and I mean meg-low, made for $7,000 apparently] budget film about two guys, who are basically part-time garage inventors who accidentally create a time machine.

What's different about that you may say?

Well the answer is it is the first serious look at the possible ramifications and difficulties that, if theoretically time travel were possible, would have on anyone who did go back in time.

It's very confusing and the plot is very difficult to follow but it's very intelligent and really gets you thinking about all those little things that could happen to you if you did time travel such as how would the body and the mind actually cope with it, or what happens if your cell phone rings while you are in the past, will it also ring for your past self?

Anyway I love thinking about all these things, even until my brain fries trying to fathom it all out.

If you liked films like Memento or The Butterfly Effect you'll love this.
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Postby Malia » Thu Oct 18, 2007 1:14 am

That sounds really intriguing. My brother Dan recently read a novel about time travel (can't recall the name or author, unfortunately) but in it, given the particular way time travel was made available in this story, every time a person went back in time he or she came back as a carbon copy of him or her self. So, a person could only go back in time so many times before that person's body wouldn't work anymore--being a copy of a copy of a copy. It sounded pretty interesting. I'm one of those closet sci-fi fans. I don't talk about it a lot, but I tend to like it--as long as it is fairly intelligent, mind you. People just blasting eachother into smithereens in some other galaxy is boring. But using sci-fi to discuss and play out philosophical issues is great.
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Postby Saturn » Thu Oct 18, 2007 1:35 pm

Yes well in this film, the more they go back in time, the more it affects them physically, they begin to bleed in places and they are unable to write properly, its fascinating.

Oww my brain hurts trying to think of the possibilities :!:
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Postby Heaven/Hell » Thu Oct 18, 2007 1:52 pm

Saturn wrote:Please do, it's getting very heated between these two :shock:

It's almost come to blows :!:


Now who's being over-dramatic? :razz:
It was a simple misunderstanding is all. Our mutual affection for Whitman was so sincere we each felt slighted when the other implied that knowledge and respect for him was scant.
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Postby Saturn » Thu Oct 18, 2007 2:23 pm

I'm such a drama Queen :oops:

I hate arguments that's all.

Maybe because I'm rubbish at them...
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Postby Heaven/Hell » Fri Oct 19, 2007 2:39 pm

Saturn wrote:I'm such a drama Queen :oops:

I hate arguments that's all.

Maybe because I'm rubbish at them...


I hate to argue too, but my sensitive side will not abate when admiration or opinions on something I have a deep, irrefutable feeling for is called into question. I was very argumentative as an early teenager, I would not let up my indignance when I knew I was right.

"You'd make a bloody saint swear", as my stepfather would constantly say of me (when he came off worse in debates).

Lousy traumatic childhood. ;)
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Re: The currently viewing thread...

Postby Credo Buffa » Mon May 18, 2009 3:36 pm

Okay, have y'all seen the new Star Trek movie yet? Because you have to if you haven't. I'm geeking out, no joke. . . and I'm not even a Trekkie!

But, I'll admit, I've been inspired. I grew up with a slightly Trekkie dad--not the sort to dress up or go to conventions or anything like that, but the sort to watch the shows avidly and collect Hallmark Christmas ornaments (you should hear our tree, it's crazy) and change the sound theme on his computer and name his son Kirk, although he still insists that was more a choice based on a college friend of his than after the Captain--so I suppose I always had a latent curiosity. But apparently the entire original series is up online via CBS/Hulu, so I spent a good chunk of my weekend lazing about and watching the first half of the first season. Is it dated? Yes. Is it campy? You betcha. Are there bits that are eye-rollingly ridiculous? Of course. Is it fun in spite--or even perhaps because--of all this? Heck yeah!

I've also developed a kind of crazy attraction to Spock, though I'm assured by other sources that I'm not entirely alone there. :wink:
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Re: The currently viewing thread...

Postby Malia » Mon May 18, 2009 5:19 pm

Credo, I have watched the new Trek film--saw it on Friday with one of my friends. We both enjoy Star Trek, but are not exactly Trekies. (I've seen all of the original series and love the campyness of it--but I especially enjoyed the Next Generation TV show.) I thought the movie was handled brilliantly; the basic plot premise was frankly quite simple, which gave the story room to build up characters and introduce the new Trek "universe". There were parts of the movie that went a little too fast for me (I literally had to turn my head away from the screen during the phazer shoot out--all the quick movements and flashing lights overwhelmed my senses) but it had everything else: great humor, interesting takes on old--but now new again--characters; amazing special effects that did *not* get in the way of plot and character development. I'm sure I'll watch the next installment when it comes out.

You've got a crush on Spock, hmm? I assume you're talking about "young" Spock? Or are you also into Nimoy's original Spock? While I'm not really attracted to Spock, per se, (although it is interesting to see him as more emotional--or at least more openly struggling with his emotions) the guy who plays the young Spock is pretty handsome, actually (when dressed as himself! hehe).
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Re: The currently viewing thread...

Postby BrokenLyre » Sat May 23, 2009 7:51 pm

I will have to see this now...despite my reservations :)
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Re: The currently viewing thread...

Postby BrokenLyre » Thu May 28, 2009 7:45 am

Ok I admit it - I don't know about "viewing" but I am trying to read Ward's "John Keats" (updated version) for the 2nd time. I never got far the first time due to job constraints - but now I am going for it. I do like her style of writing.
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Re: The currently viewing thread...

Postby Malia » Thu May 28, 2009 2:24 pm

I have a special place in my heart for the Ward biography. It may not be the most academic, but it is the most human, psychological, and poetically written of the great 1960's biographies, in my humble opinion. Ward's was the first Keats biography I read, back in high school. I was about 17 and had been reading his poetry and selected letters and just felt compelled to learn more about him, so I went to my school library and wonder of wonders, there was Ward's biography sitting on the shelves. Upon opening the back cover, I saw that the last time the book had been checked out was over twenty years before! (Keats was obviously very popular at my school :roll: ) So I checked it out and literally fell in love! Ward is a great introduction to Keats, because she focuses on his growth and maturing as a *person* and a poet. The way Ward approaches it, his relationships (especially with various family members and most especially with his brother Tom and his mother) absolutely influence not only his poetry but his whole person-hood and perspective on life, love, and death. The book was so transformational that when it was due to be returned (after I'd checked it out twice), I told the librarian that I'd lost it and paid the price of the book--what it cost when they purchased it in 1962 ($7.00). It was one of the best deals I'd ever made--and I figured no one would miss it from the school library ;)
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Re: The currently viewing thread...

Postby BrokenLyre » Thu May 28, 2009 7:45 pm

That is totally awesome. I understand completely - especially wanting to buy the book from the library! :lol:
As I said, I really like the way Ward writes with such close, sensitive identification with Keats and his circumstances.

Your library episode reminds me of when I was in the Orlando Florida Public Library a few years ago. I asked them if I could buy one of their Keats books (a rare one I was looking for). They said no! Then I said, "But I will pay cash!" They said, "No. This is a library" to which I responded, "Yes, I know it's a library, but I see that you also sell books from your library downstairs. So why can't I buy this one?" She replied with a serious tone, "But these books are not for sale." Just for fun I wanted to see how far I could go, so I asked, "You mean to tell me that I can't buy this Keats book for ANY price? Everything has a price."

"This is a library, the book is not for sale," she said. Finally I stated, "So if I offer $1,000 right now you wouldn't let me buy the book?" Then she said, "Well......."

No, I didn't buy the book - I was just curious to see how far they would go. The point is that you got a great deal on Ward's book - whereas I just got an argument. :)
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Re: The currently viewing thread...

Postby Malia » Thu May 28, 2009 7:51 pm

You've gotta be sneaky, BrokenLyre! :lol: Yes, it is true--I confess--I *lied* in order to obtain my copy of the Ward biography; but it was in the name of Keats! :P
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