The 'Currently reading' thread...

Discussion of other topics not necessarily Keats or poetry-related, i.e. other authors, literature, film, music, the arts etc.

Moderators: Saturn, Malia

Re: The 'Currently reading' thread...

Postby Saturn » Wed Apr 11, 2012 7:12 pm

My voluntary job at the moment consist of walking, working in a forest, I walk a lot every day, couldn't do without it. Seems most people today can barely walk the length of themselves though; wouldn't even walk round the corner to the shop.

I'd really love to be able to climb hills, mountains, walk country roads do a tour like Keats and Brown; sadly don't have my own Brown, someone able, and mad enough to do it with me.

I've often wished that Micahel Palin, or even the historian, Michael Wood might make a TV show along the lines of 'In the footstep of Keats' retracing his trek around the highlands over to Ireland etc.
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
Saturn
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 3939
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:16 am

Re: The 'Currently reading' thread...

Postby Cath » Wed Apr 11, 2012 8:05 pm

Saturn wrote:I'd really love to be able to climb hills, mountains, walk country roads do a tour like Keats and Brown; sadly don't have my own Brown, someone able, and mad enough to do it with me.


It was a phenomenal distance they covered! I'd love to see a TV show on it, too.

Brown gets a bad press (particularly in Bright Star) doesn't he? But it's great Keats had that friendship for those months or short years. I can totally understand Brown being criticised for not accompanying Keats to Italy, but I don't think the reasons were only selfish; he seemed unwilling or unable to accept that Keats's health was deteriorating, almost psychologically unable to confront the prospect of loss. Yet there is something charming about their friendship for the most part.
"Why should we be owls, when we can be Eagles?" (Keats to Reynolds, 3 February 1818)
User avatar
Cath
Calidore
 
Posts: 251
Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2011 1:02 pm
Location: in a bottle of claret, looking out

Re: The 'Currently reading' thread...

Postby Cath » Sun Apr 15, 2012 10:57 am

I'm re-reading the Plumly book on my last day off. It really is good.
"Why should we be owls, when we can be Eagles?" (Keats to Reynolds, 3 February 1818)
User avatar
Cath
Calidore
 
Posts: 251
Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2011 1:02 pm
Location: in a bottle of claret, looking out

Re: The 'Currently reading' thread...

Postby Saturn » Sun Apr 15, 2012 8:12 pm

Now reading 'In the shadow of the sword' by Tom Holland about the end of classical antiquity, the rise of the Islamic faith and the response of the two great empires of Persia and Rome's response to it. Gripping and surprising as all of Holland's previous books, this one perhaps more so because it's a subject and a period of history so little known beyond specialists in the west.
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
Saturn
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 3939
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:16 am

Re: The 'Currently reading' thread...

Postby Cath » Sun Apr 15, 2012 8:18 pm

Jesus, heavy reading for a Sunday night! :lol:

Saturn, I bumped into this today and thought you might be interested if you don't know it already:
http://www.faber.co.uk/work/walking-home/9780571249886/
"Why should we be owls, when we can be Eagles?" (Keats to Reynolds, 3 February 1818)
User avatar
Cath
Calidore
 
Posts: 251
Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2011 1:02 pm
Location: in a bottle of claret, looking out

Re: The 'Currently reading' thread...

Postby Saturn » Mon Apr 16, 2012 12:52 pm

I hadn't heard of that, thanks Cath, looks interesting.
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
Saturn
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 3939
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:16 am

Re: The 'Currently reading' thread...

Postby Saturn » Wed May 09, 2012 4:54 am

Now ploughing my way through a very large volume of Plutarch's Lives as translated by Dryden and others.
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
Saturn
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 3939
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:16 am

Re: The 'Currently reading' thread...

Postby BrokenLyre » Thu May 10, 2012 4:13 am

Wow - good luck Saturn. You are remarkable in your range of reading.
"Come... dry your eyes, for you are life, rarer than a quark and unpredictable beyond the dreams of Heisenberg; the clay in which the forces that shape all things leave their fingerprints most clearly. Dry your eyes... and let's go home."
BrokenLyre
Endymion
 
Posts: 592
Joined: Wed Jan 07, 2009 1:24 am
Location: New York State

Re: The 'Currently reading' thread...

Postby Cath » Sun May 13, 2012 3:23 pm

I'm currently reading Paul O' Keeffe's A Genius for Failure: The Life of Benjamin Robert Haydon ... and am quite liking it so far. Or rather, I'm enjoying learning more about Haydon's life :wink: .
"Why should we be owls, when we can be Eagles?" (Keats to Reynolds, 3 February 1818)
User avatar
Cath
Calidore
 
Posts: 251
Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2011 1:02 pm
Location: in a bottle of claret, looking out

Re: The 'Currently reading' thread...

Postby marwood » Tue May 15, 2012 8:19 pm

Your voluntary job sounds great Saturn. I love walking. I go to the Peak District in Derbyshire
whenever I can, great walks there. Nice to get out of the city for a while.
Take care. Marwood.
That I might drink, and leave the world unseen.
marwood
At Parnassus' foot
 
Posts: 121
Joined: Tue Feb 17, 2009 3:22 pm
Location: Birmingham England

Re: The 'Currently reading' thread...

Postby Saturn » Thu May 24, 2012 6:20 am

Just read...
Image

Never got to see Danny Boyle's acclaimed play with Jonny Lee Miler and Benedict Cumberbatch, so this is the closest I'll get.

It's an interesting take on the novel, which excises a great deal of the extraneous plot and characters and owes much I think to Kenneth Branagh's 1994 film, which some may balk at but to me is a positive boon. The creature is very much to the fore here and is the most sympathetic character and Frankenstein here is a somewhat cold, distant, emotionless figure, which suits this adaptation I'm sure but is not really fair to the character in the novel. It is he, and he alone who is the monster, and the abomination who won't give Elizabeth children, who blames his father for William's death.

Very interesting, if short adaptation. I'm sure it works better on stage in the hands of two great actors, swapping roles.
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
Saturn
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 3939
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:16 am

Re: The 'Currently reading' thread...

Postby MrsRsCat » Thu May 24, 2012 2:16 pm

Hi Cath,
I must say Genius for Failure wasn't my favourite read. I found the writing rather dull and pedestrian and the illustrations shockingly badly printed. Nevertheless having shelled out I dutifully plodded through to the (gruesome) end.

I can't help feeling frustrated that the greatest Romantic poet - John Keats - and the greatest Romantic painter - John Constable - didn't bump into each other on Hampstead Heath where they were both living at around the same time.
Constable's earliest glorious cloud studies date from around 1821 but I can't help but feel he must have been au fait with the area before moving in.

Those sonnets were wasted on Haydon!
MrsRsCat
 
Posts: 31
Joined: Wed Apr 06, 2011 4:16 pm

Re: The 'Currently reading' thread...

Postby Ennis » Mon May 28, 2012 3:19 am

MrsRsCat wrote:Hi Cath,
I must say Genius for Failure wasn't my favourite read. I found the writing rather dull and pedestrian and the illustrations shockingly badly printed. Nevertheless having shelled out I dutifully plodded through to the (gruesome) end.

I can't help feeling frustrated that the greatest Romantic poet - John Keats - and the greatest Romantic painter - John Constable - didn't bump into each other on Hampstead Heath where they were both living at around the same time.
Constable's earliest glorious cloud studies date from around 1821 but I can't help but feel he must have been au fait with the area before moving in.

Those sonnets were wasted on Haydon!


Plumly has actually written(and has recorded) a poem about this very subject: Keats, the Heath, Constable and his cloud painting(s), and how if Keats had lived just a little longer, the two may actually have met (so, so many "what if's" in Keats's short life . . . ). You can hear Plumly's recitation (but the text isn't shown) if you go to www.poets.org. Type in Plumly's name and the title of the poem is "Constable's Clouds, for Keats."
"But if you will fully love me, though there may be some fire, 'twill not be more than we can bear when moistened and bedewed with Pleasures." JK to FB 08.07.1819
User avatar
Ennis
Calidore
 
Posts: 387
Joined: Sun May 16, 2010 2:24 am
Location: Not where (or when) I want to be.

Re: The 'Currently reading' thread...

Postby MrsRsCat » Wed Jun 06, 2012 9:22 am

Wow. Thanks for this Ennis. Off to read this.
xx
MrsRsCat
 
Posts: 31
Joined: Wed Apr 06, 2011 4:16 pm

Re: The 'Currently reading' thread...

Postby Raphael » Tue Jun 12, 2012 3:40 pm

Sounds interesting.
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
User avatar
Raphael
Milton
 
Posts: 1845
Joined: Mon Oct 19, 2009 6:10 pm
Location: wandering Keats' poetry

PreviousNext

Return to Miscellaneous

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest