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PostPosted: Fri Jun 16, 2006 12:53 am
by Malia
Found this on the BBC website in the "have your say" forum:

"Don't smoke, drink, have sex or eat junk food. You don't live any longer, it just feels like it!" :D

PostPosted: Fri Jun 16, 2006 9:43 pm
by Saturn
"All the mistakes I made,
I made because I didn't know my self very well,
and by this stage,
I feel like I really should know myself,
I'm forced into a sponsored silence,
where I'm only paid if I don't say what I want to say,

Open up your arms and say,
I can't throw it all away,
open up your arms and say,
I can't give it all away,
I couldn't even care what you say,
you change,
you change everyday,
and blame it on your obvious ways..."
Idlewild - Blame It On Obvious Ways.

PostPosted: Sat Jun 17, 2006 10:24 pm
by Saturn
Some quotes from the much Underrated Alexander Pope:

“In poets as true genius is but rare,
True taste as seldom is the critics share;
Both must alike from Heaven derive their light,
These born to judge, as well as those to write.
Let such teach others who themselves excel,
And censure freely who have written well.
Authors are partial to their wit, ‘tis true,
But are not critics to their judgement too?
‘An Essay on Criticism’ 11-20.

“Music resembles poetry, in each
Are nameless graces which no methods teach,
And which a master-hand alone can reach.”
Ibid. 143-5.


“A little learning is a dangerous thing;
Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring:
There shallow draughts intoxicate the brain,
And drinking largely sobers us again.”
'Windsor Forest', 215-8.

“True wit is nature to advantage dressed,
What oft was thought, but ne’er so well expressed;
Something, whose truth convincing at sight we find,
That give us back the image of our mind.”
Ibid.297-300.

“Such shameless bards we have, and yet ‘tis true,
There are as mad, abandoned critics too.
The bookful blockhead, ignorantly read,
With loads of learnÀd lumber in his head,
With his own tongue still edifies his ears,
And always listening to himself appears.”
Ibid. 610-5.

“Fame, wealth, and honour! what are you to love?
The jealous god, when we profane his fires,
Those restless passions in revenge inspires,
And bids them make mistaken mortals groan,
Who seek in love for aught but love alone.”
‘Eloisa to Abelard’, 80-5.

PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2006 11:42 pm
by Saturn
“…it’s one thing to write as a poet and quite another to write as a historian: the poet can narrate or sing events not as they were but as they should have been, and the historian must record them not as they should have been but as they were, without adding to the truth or taking anything away from it.”
-Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, El ingenioso hidalgo Don Quixote de la Mancha.
Pt. II, Ch. III.

PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2006 11:45 pm
by Malia
Saturn wrote:“…it’s one thing to write as a poet and quite another to write as a historian: the poet can narrate or sing events not as they were but as they should have been, and the historian must record them not as they should have been but as they were, without adding to the truth or taking anything away from it.”
-Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, El ingenioso hidalgo Don Quixote de la Mancha.
Pt. II, Ch. III.


That begs the question: Can there be any real historians? Everything is written with a bias--history included.

PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2006 11:51 pm
by Saturn
Historians are merely interpreters of the past.

They put the bias, the spin, the outlook of their own age into whatever they write.

PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2006 10:51 pm
by Saturn
“In the little world in which children have their existence whosoever brings them up, there is nothing so finely perceived and so finely felt as injustice. It may be only small injustice that the child can be exposed to; but the child is small, and its world is small…”

-Charles Dickens, Great Expectations.
Vol. I, Ch. VIII

PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2006 11:08 pm
by dks
Ooooohhh--love that Dickens fellow. "Great Expectations" is truly a masterpiece...

Oh, the story of Dickens and that Ellen Turnin actress lady--wow...scandalous and romantic--a real "Age of Innocence" type like story... :shock:

PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2006 11:35 pm
by Saturn
dks wrote:Ooooohhh--love that Dickens fellow. "Great Expectations" is truly a masterpiece...

Oh, the story of Dickens and that Ellen Turnin actress lady--wow...scandalous and romantic--a real "Age of Innocence" type like story... :shock:


Absolutely :shock:

Great Expectations is definitely in my top five novels :D

PostPosted: Sat Jun 24, 2006 12:52 am
by dks
Ahh, yes!

I love Joe Gargery...and there's a beautiful, poetic exchange between Pip and Joe which I thought Dickens spun very well--he says that Joe brushed Pip's shoulder and it felt, to Pip, "like the faint rustle of angel's wing."

:shock:

Fine writing...very fine writing, indeed.

PostPosted: Sat Jun 24, 2006 10:11 am
by Saturn
The whole scene where Joe comes to London to visit Pip is beautifuuly written and unbearably uncomfortable .

You almost physically squirm at the discomfort of it all.

PostPosted: Sat Jun 24, 2006 5:33 pm
by dks
Yes!! I get so angry with Pip everytime I read what an ass he is to Joe--- :evil:

PostPosted: Sat Jun 24, 2006 9:13 pm
by Saturn
That's what 'Great Expectataions' do to you :wink:

PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 11:48 pm
by Saturn
“…she leaves behind her an unmistakable sense of remonstrance, as if an angel had briefly touched the surface of the world with one sandaled foot, asked if there was any trouble and, being told all was well, had resumed her place in the ether with skeptical gravity, having reminded the children of earth that they are just barely trusted to manage their own business, and that further carelessness will not go unremarked.”
P 27.

“She thinks of how much more space a being occupies in life than it does in death; how much illusion of size is contained in gestures and movements, in breathing. Dead we are all revealed in our true dimensions, and they are surprisingly modest.”
P 165.

“There are, after all, so many books. Some of them, a handful, are good, and of that handful, only a few survive.”
P 225.
~Michael Cunningham, The Hours

A wonderful, moving book...an astonishing film.

Some may think it is too depressing [who've probably never seen it] - it is actually life-affirming stuff.

PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 11:53 pm
by Malia
“There are, after all, so many books. Some of them, a handful, are good, and of that handful, only a few survive.”
P 225.
~Michael Cunningham, The Hours

A wonderful, moving book...an astonishing film.

Some may think it is too depressing [who've probably never seen it] - it is actually life-affirming stuff.


True, Michael Cunningham's books can be seen as depressing--I read A Home at the End of the World and it was a bit of a downer, in its way, but his writing is so excellent, you can't help but love the read!