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Discussion of other topics not necessarily Keats or poetry-related, i.e. other authors, literature, film, music, the arts etc.

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Postby dks » Sun Apr 23, 2006 6:02 pm

Saturn wrote:I have shamefully neglected this thread after promising to post something every day :roll:

Well here's one for St. Georges Day - one of the greatest English poets for you:

"The joyes of love, if they should ever last,
Without affliction or disquietnesse,
That worldly chaunces doe amonst them cast,
Would be on earth too great a blessednesse.
Therefore the winged God, to let men weet,
That here on earth is no sure happinesse,
A thousand sowres hath tempred with one sweet,
To make it seeme more deare and dainty, as is meet"
Spenser, The Faerie Queene, XI, 1.


:shock: Amazing. I'm actually reading FQ as we speak...
"I am certain of nothing but the holiness of the heart's affections and the Truth of Imagination."
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Postby Saturn » Sun Apr 23, 2006 6:04 pm

It's wonderful to get immersed in - you have to be dedicated though - it's very alllegorical and VERY long :D

I've read it twice through over the years and have kept little quotes like the one above so I don't have to plough through the whole thing again.

:lol:
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Postby dks » Sun Apr 23, 2006 6:27 pm

Yes...long, indeed. But it's fascinating and so bastardly well written--it makes you sit gazing and wondering "how the hell did he manage to do this?" Sort of like I do whenever I read Keats or Shakespeare... :lol:
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Postby Credo Buffa » Sun Apr 23, 2006 7:31 pm

I don't know that I've ever posted a quote on this thread. Here's one of my favorites: :lol:

"The flute is the show-off of the wind section, the big shot: Jean-Pierre Rampal, James Galway--both millionaires. (How many millionaire bassoonists can you name real fast?) Well, that's fine. Everybody knows it's the hardest, blowing across a tiny hole with your head tilted all your life: it's like soloing on a pop bottle. The problem with the flute is that it vibrates your brain, and you start wearing big white caftans and smocks and eat roots and berries. You become a pantheist and sit in meadows, and you believe that all is one and God is everything--God is a column of air vibrating--and you know that's not right."

~Garrison Keillor, in The Young Lutheran's Guide to the Orchestra
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Postby dks » Sun Apr 23, 2006 8:41 pm

That's awesome, Credo!!! I love it... :lol:
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Postby Saturn » Sun Apr 23, 2006 9:46 pm

Credo Buffa wrote:~Garrison Keillor, in The Young Lutheran's Guide to the Orchestra


Is that a serious title?? :lol:
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Postby Malia » Sun Apr 23, 2006 10:24 pm

Credo Buffa wrote:I don't know that I've ever posted a quote on this thread. Here's one of my favorites: :lol:

"The flute is the show-off of the wind section, the big shot: Jean-Pierre Rampal, James Galway--both millionaires. (How many millionaire bassoonists can you name real fast?) Well, that's fine. Everybody knows it's the hardest, blowing across a tiny hole with your head tilted all your life: it's like soloing on a pop bottle. The problem with the flute is that it vibrates your brain, and you start wearing big white caftans and smocks and eat roots and berries. You become a pantheist and sit in meadows, and you believe that all is one and God is everything--God is a column of air vibrating--and you know that's not right."

~Garrison Keillor, in The Young Lutheran's Guide to the Orchestra


I've totally heard this before--didn't he do it as a monologue once? I always thought it was called "why a Lutheran can't play any instrument in the orchestr"--because *every* instrument is too sensual or sexual for a proper Lutheran to play. I LOVE that piece.
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Postby Credo Buffa » Mon Apr 24, 2006 2:16 am

Yes, it is serious, Saturn! :P

Garrison Keillor is a radio personality from Minnesota who does a National Public Radio show called "A Prairie Home Companion". It's basically a radio variety show, broadcast live with musical performances (typically of the classical/folk persuasion; the orchestra at my college was featured once while I was there) and poems and stories. It focuses around a fictional Minnesota town called Lake Wobegon ("where all the women are strong, all the men all good looking and all children are above average"), and sort of satirizes straight-laced, Lutheran, small town midwestern life in a loving, nostalgic way. It seems like the kind of thing that people on this forum would like; I've heard Garrison Keillor's brand of humor described as being "literary" :D

There's actually a movie of "Prairie Home Companion" that's supposed to be coming out sometime this year.

Anyway, he once did a segment called "The Young Lutheran's Guide to the Orchestra", which is considered one of his classics. I found a transcript of it: http://www.harrogate.co.uk/harrogate-band/humour40.htm :D
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Postby Credo Buffa » Tue Apr 25, 2006 6:19 am

Here's one that might help us all with our poetry month writing, from one of my favorite composers, Aaron Copland:

"Inspiration may be a form of superconsciousness, or perhaps of subconsciousness - I wouldn't know. But I am sure it is the antithesis of self- consciousness."
"Holy Kleenex, Batman! It was right under our nose and we blew it!"
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Postby Saturn » Tue Apr 25, 2006 9:24 am

“…That’s the whole trouble. You can’t ever find a place that’s nice and peaceful, because there isn’t any. You may think there is, but once you get there, when you’re not looking, somebody’ll sneak up and write ‘Fuck you’ right under your nose. Try it sometime.”
J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye, Ch. 25, P 183.
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Postby dks » Tue Apr 25, 2006 6:15 pm

Saturn wrote:“…That’s the whole trouble. You can’t ever find a place that’s nice and peaceful, because there isn’t any. You may think there is, but once you get there, when you’re not looking, somebody’ll sneak up and write ‘Fuck you’ right under your nose. Try it sometime.”
J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye, Ch. 25, P 183.


Love it. :wink:
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Thoughts in preparation for the days of a summer in the sun.

Postby jamiano » Tue Apr 25, 2006 7:30 pm

Hello to everyone. I am immersed in a project, discovering the appealing traits of Fanny that engulfed Keats. I sincerely believe
that Keats'attraction to her is quite complex;one of class, maternal, artistic muse, and above all, a reflection of a past love. Due to Keats' early emotional losses, his submerged anxiety was released
through Fanny. Well, this is just an idea. A word on critics. Keats'
works survive by the adoration of beauty within each of his readers.


Quotes for today:



And 'tis my faith, that every flower
Enjoys the air it breathes.


Lines Written in Early Spring

Wordsworth



The harvest of a quiet eye.


A Poet's Epitaph

Wordsworth




peace to all,
jamiano
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Re: Thoughts in preparation for the days of a summer in the

Postby Malia » Tue Apr 25, 2006 8:08 pm

jamiano wrote:Hello to everyone. I am immersed in a project, discovering the appealing traits of Fanny that engulfed Keats. I sincerely believe
that Keats'attraction to her is quite complex;one of class, maternal, artistic muse, and above all, a reflection of a past love. Due to Keats' early emotional losses, his submerged anxiety was released
through Fanny. Well, this is just an idea. A word on critics. Keats'
works survive by the adoration of beauty within each of his readers.


Jamiano, your project sounds VERY interesting! Is it for a class? I agree, Keats's relationship with Fanny Brawne was extremely complex and riveting. Is there anything in particular you've discovered in your research/meditation on this subject that stands out in your mind as especially interesting?

I've always believed that, in part, Keats's ambivalent feelings toward Fanny were an outlet for his semi-conscious love-hate relationship with his mother. (I know, sounds really Freudian!)
How do you think his relationship with his mother influenced his feelings for Fanny?

I absolutely agree with your comment on why Keats's works survive today. That's the wonder of reading literature. We each play an important part in breathing life into the ideas of a person who died years ago. In a way, we are participating in immortality every time we open a book :)


Quotes for today:



And 'tis my faith, that every flower
Enjoys the air it breathes.


Lines Written in Early Spring

Wordsworth


I love that quote!



The harvest of a quiet eye.


A Poet's Epitaph

Wordsworth




peace to all,
jamiano[/quote]
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Postby dks » Tue Apr 25, 2006 9:10 pm

I think Keats's feeling for Fanny can best be described by something he said to her in one of those famously gorgeous letters:

"I love you the more in that I believe you have liked me for my own sake and nothing else."

As flirtatious as she may have been or as unschooled within the realms of poesy she was, I think Keats really clung to the idea that she loved Keats the man, not Keats the poet or writer or doctor, etc...theirs was a young love...fraught with the same difficulties young love faces today--parents not approving, not having money or foundation with which to start a life together...I think they both had these things going on...it's just that Keats had an all consuming passion...in everything he did...and Fanny's disposition did not reflect that--she's not guilty of not loving him as much as he loved her, I don't think--so much as she was a victim of his circumstances and she simply harbored a much more mild, if not conventionally stylish mode of temperment and disposition.

If you ask me, had he lived longer...I don't think they would've married. I think her mother would've have gotten in the way--Mrs. Brawne (Fanny's mother) knew he was ill...hence, things played out the way they did.
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Postby Credo Buffa » Wed Apr 26, 2006 12:22 am

Bah! I just had a nice, long response typed up here, and then the stupid window closed on me! :evil:

This sounds like a great project, jamiano! And I completely agree; Keats's attraction to Fanny was no doubt a very complicated situation. After all, knowing how he was with women and love in general, how could it not be!

You also bring up a very interesting hypothetical scenario, dks. . . and I have to say that I probably agree with you on some level. There just seem to be too many red flags on too many sides for their relationship to have carried on much longer. Had they married, I don't think they would have ended up very happy in the end, unfortunately :( Perhaps it's a good thing we'll never have to know that.
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