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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2006 1:28 am
by Fortuna
dks wrote:Your avatar looks quite like you. Bonita!


I'm delighted you think so :).

It's painted by John William Waterhouse, I don't know if all of you are familiar with this work but he's also been inspired by Keats' poetry.

PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2006 4:09 am
by dks
Fortuna wrote:
dks wrote:Your avatar looks quite like you. Bonita!


I'm delighted you think so :).

It's painted by John William Waterhouse, I don't know if all of you are familiar with this work but he's also been inspired by Keats' poetry.


Did he also paint a version of Isabella and the Pot of Basil? I love that image...

PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2006 9:15 am
by Saturn
Thanks for the link Fortuna - I've seen those paintings before but never had a name to put to the artist.

I love all that Pre-raphaelite art :shock:

PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2006 4:11 pm
by Fortuna
Saturn wrote:I love all that Pre-raphaelite art :shock:


Oh me too... Pre-Raphaelite art is a real weakness of mine- and do my friends know it! I have countless birthday cards all with Waterhouse's works. I have been lucky enough to see some of those works in galleries up close. I was quite struck by how large they are and it almost feels like the subjects are ready to step right out of the frames. I think I may have even fallen in love with Waterhouse's paintings of Keat's poetry before I discovered his source of inspiration... it's hazy who came first. :)

PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2006 6:53 pm
by dks
Fortuna wrote:
Saturn wrote:I love all that Pre-raphaelite art :shock:


Oh me too... Pre-Raphaelite art is a real weakness of mine- and do my friends know it! I have countless birthday cards all with Waterhouse's works. I have been lucky enough to see some of those works in galleries up close. I was quite struck by how large they are and it almost feels like the subjects are ready to step right out of the frames. I think I may have even fallen in love with Waterhouse's paintings of Keat's poetry before I discovered his source of inspiration... it's hazy who came first. :)


Yes...those Pre-Raphaelite painted women--ethereal looking expressions and long, thick locks with warm lighted backgrounds...
I, myself, like Dante Rosetti.

PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2006 9:36 pm
by Saturn
dks wrote:
Yes...those Pre-Raphaelite painted women--ethereal looking expressions and long, thick locks with warm lighted backgrounds...
I, myself, like Dante Rosetti.


That's the boy.

He was undoubtedly the master of the form...and a not-too shabby poet either :D

PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2006 9:45 pm
by dks
Saturn wrote:
He was undoubtedly the master of the form...and a not-too shabby poet either :D



Yes! Check out "A Match with the Moon" and "Autumn Idleness"--
very nice... :wink:

PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2006 9:54 pm
by Malia
I think Rosetti's sister was a writer, as well.

PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2006 10:00 pm
by dks
Malia wrote:I think Rosetti's sister was a writer, as well.


Christina. Yes, she's great, too. Check out "From the Antique" by her--awesome.

Oh, and Dante Rosetti's best poem is probably "Sudden Light." It's a little tribute to deja vu...for those of us who don't believe in coincidence!! :wink:

PostPosted: Fri Apr 21, 2006 10:05 am
by Fortuna
I discovered Christina Rossetti's work only a week ago myself. Her mother Frances Polidori, was the sister of Lord Byron's physician. And I believe Dante Gabriel Rossetti befriended W.H. Hunt after seeing a painting of his based on Keats' The Eve of St Agnes.