Muses and artisst- who would JK admire of today's?

Discussion of other topics not necessarily Keats or poetry-related, i.e. other authors, literature, film, music, the arts etc.

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Re: Muses and artisst- who would JK admire of today's?

Postby Saturn » Tue Jan 12, 2010 11:54 am

I love Jeff Buckley, have been a fan for years, and his work is as varied, inspirational and haunting as anything Keats wrote. His death was such a loss, a real tragedy for the music world as he had only just begun to scratch the surface of what he was capable of.
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
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Re: Muses and artisst- who would JK admire of today's?

Postby Raphael » Wed Jan 13, 2010 3:58 pm

if you like Gaelic and good singing try this from Kate Bush BL:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VpMGWOAAKs4

Brilliant!
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: Muses and artisst- who would JK admire of today's?

Postby Credo Buffa » Wed Jan 13, 2010 6:43 pm

Raphael wrote:I think he'd also like Sigur Ros for similar reasons.


I concur. Sigur Ros is a group that you can appreciate no matter what language you speak. I fondly remember a DJ on my favorite radio station, after playing a Sigur Ros song, saying something along the lines of, "They could be singing about latrines and I wouldn't care!" In particular, I think their concept of Vonlenska (language used for its emotive sound rather than meaning) is particularly poetic in nature. They truly are a 21st century embodiment of Romanticism.

As for Riverdance, I think a contemporary Keats would probably not be too fond of it. As someone who has seen the show--and I do feel kind of bad about saying it because I have a friend in the cast--the impression I got was definitely of a sensationalized and highly commercial version of Irish culture that he would find distasteful. If anything, I think he'd appreciate something more intimate and genuine, like an impromptu sean nos competition at an Irish pub.
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Re: Muses and artisst- who would JK admire of today's?

Postby Saturn » Wed Jan 13, 2010 7:01 pm

Riverdance is to Irish dancing what High School Musical is to the 30s MGM musicals - so over the top, polished and glitzy and glamorous that it bears no relation to real Irish dancing.
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Re: Muses and artisst- who would JK admire of today's?

Postby BrokenLyre » Wed Jan 13, 2010 9:06 pm

That is fascinating, I must say. And you would know Saturn since you are certainly more familiar with Irish dance than many of us here on this side of the pond. Based on Keats' comments in his letters about the Irish jig, he no doubt enjoyed it with enthusiasm. Safe to say he would enjoy it today as well.
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Re: Muses and artisst- who would JK admire of today's?

Postby Credo Buffa » Wed Jan 13, 2010 10:17 pm

The thing with Riverdance is that it's not just about the dancing. . . it's about the production and the spectacle as well. Besides, the Irish dance in Riverdance bears little resemblance to what Keats would have known when he mentions an "Irish jig." What most of the world outside of Ireland itself thinks of Irish dancing is actually a more modern, formalized version of truly traditional dance, which if you ask me certainly is very joyful and free.

Having a former roommate who is an Irish dancer of the former sense, I've personally become a bit turned off to contemporary Irish dance simply because of all the horror stories I've heard surrounding the rigid competition culture. It's like they've sapped all the true joy out of it. I remember seeing sean nos (the old style dancing) for the first time and lamenting what the entire form has become!

I also wonder if Keats might have been referring to ceili dance as well, which is probably more like the group dancing he would have seen at assembly-type events a la Jane Austen films. Even if he didn't enjoy participating, it doesn't mean he couldn't have enjoyed watching it or tapping his foot to the music!
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Re: Muses and artisst- who would JK admire of today's?

Postby Raphael » Thu Jan 14, 2010 5:31 pm

You made some good points there. The Scottish dances are different to the Irish ones- the use of arms is an example. Bute eys, what John saw in Scotland seemed the local folk dances by the farming people and prob nothing like Riverdance.
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: Muses and artisst- who would JK admire of today's?

Postby Maureen » Fri Feb 26, 2010 3:02 pm

My immediate thought was Leonard Cohen for his melancholia and Bob Dylan for his imagery:
"Time is an ocean, but it ends at the shore.... You may not see me tomorrow"
Sadly Keats' time was more of a lake than an ocean.

Love the idea of Byron strutting his stuff a la Mercury - very appropriate!
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Re: Muses and artisst- who would JK admire of today's?

Postby Raphael » Fri Feb 26, 2010 3:44 pm

Maureen wrote:My immediate thought was Leonard Cohen for his melancholia and Bob Dylan for his imagery:
"Time is an ocean, but it ends at the shore.... You may not see me tomorrow"
Sadly Keats' time was more of a lake than an ocean.

Love the idea of Byron strutting his stuff a la Mercury - very appropriate!


Bob Dylan ..that's a thought. nice to have you on board Maureen.
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: Muses and artisst- who would JK admire of today's?

Postby Credo Buffa » Fri Feb 26, 2010 5:53 pm

Bob Dylan. . . Yes, an inspired choice! Certainly a poet of the musical world. :)
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