Proof Keats can make you feverish!

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Proof Keats can make you feverish!

Postby Raphael » Wed Feb 24, 2010 6:18 pm

The science boffins are measuring the temperature when reading love poetry like Bright Star. :D

The boffins say that

"Initial results suggest that love poetry can indeed set the heart a-flutter. The team's early analysis of four subjects revealed a noticeable difference in skin temperature around the cheek and eye regions during their recital, with the location varying according to the volunteers' academic background. ....


"With around five terabytes of thermal data to evaluate, a complete scientific explanation is going to take some time, but the idea does have a grounding in literary theory. The Romantic poets believed their inspiration came to them as a burst of heat that gradually dissipated during the writing process. When someone reads a poem, they were thought to experience some of that original heat themselves. Keats described passionate verse as creating "a burning forehead" and "a parched tongue" in the lovestruck reader."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/blog/ ... -hot-blood
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Re: Proof Keats can make you feverish!

Postby Credo Buffa » Wed Feb 24, 2010 6:53 pm

Very interesting, Raphael! Thank you for the link.

I once had a similar experience with music. I was suffering from the flu in my dorm room at college when I turned on the radio to listen to the broadcast of my wind band's latest performance. It was an amazing program, and listening to it from the "outside" for the first time was a wonderful gift on a day when I felt otherwise pretty terrible. After the broadcast was over, I took my temperature again, sure that it would have gone down since I felt better after listening. Alas, it was actually higher! I couldn't understand it. :P

I'd be interested to see this study span across various disciplines that inspire passions in people: poetry, music, art of all kinds. Maybe it could even be expanded to compare it to other things that excite people in various degrees. Say, Bob the humanities professor and Joe the mechanic both listen to a poetry recital, and then Raphael and Joe watch the fourth quarter of a football game (obviously I don't mean to assume that humanities profs don't enjoy sports--I happen to know one who does very much--or that mechanics can't be passionate about poetry, but. . . yeah, you see what I'm getting at) and see how they compare. Is it the poetry itself that is causing the temperature to rise, or the response to the stimulus, which may manifest itself for different people in different ways?
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Re: Proof Keats can make you feverish!

Postby Raphael » Wed Feb 24, 2010 7:01 pm

Very interesting, Raphael! Thank you for the link.


I'm glad you liked it! :D

..., I took my temperature again, sure that it would have gone down since I felt better after listening. Alas, it was actually higher! I couldn't understand it. :P


But did you feel better? :wink:


I'd be interested to see this study span across various disciplines that inspire passions in people: poetry, music, art of all kinds. Maybe it could even be expanded to compare it to other things that excite people in various degrees. Say, Bob the humanities professor and Joe the mechanic both listen to a poetry recital, and then Raphael and Joe watch the fourth quarter of a football game (obviously I don't mean to assume that humanities profs don't enjoy sports--I happen to know one who does very much--or that mechanics can't be passionate about poetry, but. . . yeah, you see what I'm getting at)



Ick I cannot stand sport- bores me. Never has excited me- but music, poetry and art yes indeed! :D

Is it the poetry itself that is causing the temperature to rise, or the response to the stimulus, which may manifest itself for different people in different ways?



Could go either way...
I have studied a bit of sound healing and the effct of vibrations on people and water- all very interesting. What interests me even more is John's reference to his heat in his forehead as this was how the Bard Taliesin was described- having fire in his forehead- having Inspiration. It also ties in with the Brow ( or Third Eye) Chakra in Hindu teachings.
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: Proof Keats can make you feverish!

Postby Credo Buffa » Thu Feb 25, 2010 7:02 pm

Raphael wrote:But did you feel better? :wink:

I absolutely did!

Raphael wrote:Ick I cannot stand sport- bores me. Never has excited me- but music, poetry and art yes indeed! :D

I'm a sports fan, especially baseball. I've got to believe that my temperature rises at critical, exciting moments in a good ballgame. At least my racing heart and anxiety would suggest as much. :P

Raphael wrote:I have studied a bit of sound healing and the effct of vibrations on people and water- all very interesting. What interests me even more is John's reference to his heat in his forehead as this was how the Bard Taliesin was described- having fire in his forehead- having Inspiration. It also ties in with the Brow ( or Third Eye) Chakra in Hindu teachings.

It does give a new emphasis to the idea of the ignition of passions, doesn't it? Sort of like the new research out there suggesting that you can actually die of a broken heart, one way or another. It's fun when these old, seemingly quaint or even sometimes cliche ideas turn out to have basis in science.
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Re: Proof Keats can make you feverish!

Postby Raphael » Fri Feb 26, 2010 3:41 pm

But did you feel better? :wink:


I absolutely did!




Next time I get a fever ( which is very rare) I shall read the most sexiest of his poems and letters and see if it raises my temeprature higher! :lol:

I'm a sports fan, especially baseball. I've got to believe that my temperature rises at critical, exciting moments in a good ballgame. At least my racing heart and anxiety would suggest as much. :P


You like those big buff guys huh? :wink:


It does give a new emphasis to the idea of the ignition of passions, doesn't it? Sort of like the new research out there suggesting that you can actually die of a broken heart, one way or another. It's fun when these old, seemingly quaint or even sometimes cliche ideas turn out to have basis in science.
[/quote]

I think it's true.
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: Proof Keats can make you feverish!

Postby Credo Buffa » Fri Feb 26, 2010 5:59 pm

Raphael wrote:You like those big buff guys huh? :wink:

Contrary to popular belief, I don't watch sports to ogle. :P Yes, sometimes it's an added perk for the ladies if we get to appreciate the physique of a player as well as his athleticism, but I'm absolutely in it to win it, as they say! I know my RBIs, ERAs, and batting averages, and understand the infield fly rule. ;)
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Re: Proof Keats can make you feverish!

Postby Raphael » Sat Feb 27, 2010 4:08 pm

Credo Buffa wrote:
Raphael wrote:You like those big buff guys huh? :wink:

Contrary to popular belief, I don't watch sports to ogle. :P Yes, sometimes it's an added perk for the ladies if we get to appreciate the physique of a player as well as his athleticism, but I'm absolutely in it to win it, as they say! I know my RBIs, ERAs, and batting averages, and understand the infield fly rule. ;)


I believe you... :wink:
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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