Poets that reader of Keats should like

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Poets that reader of Keats should like

Postby Nonedo » Sat Mar 13, 2010 11:51 am

First of all, Hi
Image

I have become very glad to find Batyushkov in English so I decided to share him. His style is close to Keats, though he is not so great. He was a small man, wounded in battle; he had a nickname Achilles (In Russian Achill or Ahkill, which was a mock and meant Ahk khill – Oh slim). He lived somewhere 60 years but second half of his life he was insane. The translations are quite poor, like: In my heart - the pain, and in my head - the fog,
Numbness of feelings, or fear,
'Tis like a helmock I drank

But Anyway:

http://www.poems.md/authors/konstantin- ... shkov.html
http://oldpoetry.com/oauthor/show/konst ... batiushkov

Bio http://www.rvb.ru/batyushkov/bio/bio_eng.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Konstantin_Batyushkov

I will translate myself some for you later (Or try at least)

I think everyone knows Kalidasa and Ramayana but here

http://www.sacred-texts.com/hin/sha/sha16.htm
http://www.sacred-texts.com/hin/sha/sha17.htm
http://www.sacred-texts.com/hin/sha/index.htm

And Ramayana
http://www.sacred-texts.com/hin/rama/index.htm

I will post from time to time to share the Translations I will find
To take into the air my quiet breath;
Now more than ever seems it rich to die,
To cease upon the midnight with no pain,
While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad
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Re: Poets that reader of Keats should like

Postby Nonedo » Sat Mar 13, 2010 3:33 pm

My Genius

Oh memory thou art more dear
Than reason of the dead mind cold
And oft me do thine sweetnes chears
When distant country doth me holds
Yes I remember tender voice
Yes I remember eyes deep blue
And yes on gold I do rejoice
Of hair that carelessly so grew
Of Shepherdess, of my beloved
I do remember dressing plain
And face that I have so much loved
Comes always to me for again
Oh keeper genius mine, with love
As parted joy I find I deem
And can I sleep? As cloud above
Shall cover sorrowful me dream

Here I used Google Translate (And fixed some things)

Oh, memory of the heart! You're stronger than the sad memory of Reason
And often its sweetness captivates me in a distant country.
I remember the voice of sweet words, I remember the eyes of blue
I remember the golden curls carelessly curled hair.
My shepherdess incomparable I remember the whole outfit simple,
And the image of my dear, unforgettable, travels everywhere with me.
Keeper of my genius - love in joy given separation, it:
I'll Sleep eh? pressed to the head is delightdul sad dream.
To take into the air my quiet breath;
Now more than ever seems it rich to die,
To cease upon the midnight with no pain,
While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad
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Re: Poets that reader of Keats should like

Postby Raphael » Mon Mar 15, 2010 8:59 pm

Thanks for those Nonedo. My Inspiration indeed reminds me of John Keats- the reference to the shepherdess dress ( which Fanny had worn) and recollection- you know the letter John wrote to Fanny mentioning him remembering her in this dress?
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: Poets that reader of Keats should like

Postby Saturn » Wed Mar 17, 2010 1:31 pm

Any lover of Keats should be sure to look into the much neglected John Clare, the Northamptonshire 'peasant-poet' who was a contemporary and [occasional] correspondent and admirer of Keats, as well as sharing the same publisher, John Taylor.

His long poem the Shepherd's Calender is a masterpiece of natural observation and an evocation of the long vanished life of the English countryside.
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
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Re: Poets that reader of Keats should like

Postby Raphael » Wed Mar 17, 2010 4:59 pm

Thanks Saturn- not heard of him before- I shall look him up online.
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: Poets that reader of Keats should like

Postby Saturn » Wed Mar 17, 2010 5:26 pm

I think Clare may be very much up your street so to speak, his natural descriptions are the authentic, untrammeled vision of rural England, even Keats was, despite his botanical and natural observations essentially a city boy. but Clare was the real thing, a man born and bred in the country and was a master at bringing that world to life.
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
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Re: Poets that reader of Keats should like

Postby Malia » Wed Mar 17, 2010 5:43 pm

I remember seeing a portrait of Clare in the Romantics room at the National Portrait Gallery in London and thinking, "I really should read up on this guy!" :lol: I think I remember reading that, in later life, he went insane. Is that true?
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Re: Poets that reader of Keats should like

Postby Saturn » Wed Mar 17, 2010 7:02 pm

Sadly yes, he spent the last twenty or more years of his life in an asylum :(
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
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Re: Poets that reader of Keats should like

Postby Raphael » Thu Mar 18, 2010 2:55 pm

Saturn wrote:I think Clare may be very much up your street so to speak, his natural descriptions are the authentic, untrammeled vision of rural England, even Keats was, despite his botanical and natural observations essentially a city boy. but Clare was the real thing, a man born and bred in the country and was a master at bringing that world to life.


I had a quick look on wikepedia- but my library time was running out..so didn't have much time and now I have to leave to go to that silly reed employement place in a mo. I'm getting a mobile dongle in a couple of weeks- cannot stand much more of this relying on libraries and uk online for internet.

I know John was born in London, but he spent a lot of time in the country and he seemed a duck out of water in the city. Isn't it apity they didn't know each other? They had a lot in common and the same first name!
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: Poets that reader of Keats should like

Postby Raphael » Thu Mar 18, 2010 2:56 pm

Saturn wrote:Sadly yes, he spent the last twenty or more years of his life in an asylum :(


I saw that bit- how sad...I'm gonna spend a lot of time reading about him soon. He looks very interesting..
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: Poets that reader of Keats should like

Postby Maureen » Thu Mar 18, 2010 6:13 pm

Oh yes - John Clare is a definite. His life story, although a lot longer than poor Junkets, is just as tragic. The real love of his life died and years later, having married and had - I think seven - chidlren - he became depressed due to (familiar story) the strain of wanting to follow his calling of poetry and lack of money, especially with a large family dependent on him. This led to alcoholism and what I think we'd now call a breakdown, at which point he was convinced that Mary, his first love, was alive and he was married to her.

There's a wonderful book: 'Edge of the Orison' by Iain Sinclair, a psychogeographer, who followed the route Clare took when he walked out of an asylum in Epping Forest and set off back to his home in Nothamptonshire in search of his Mary.

And as far as our John is concerned, of course although Hampstead is now firmly within London, in his day it was a country village - and one of the lovely things about the area is it still has that feel about it.
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Re: Poets that reader of Keats should like

Postby Nonedo » Thu Mar 18, 2010 8:27 pm

You guys never heard of John Clare?
What?!
You HAVE heard of Edward FitzGerald? His translation of Omar Khayyam (Or other persian verses)?

Wake! For the Sun, who scatter'd into flight
The Stars before him from the Field of Night,
Drives Night along with them from Heav'n, and strikes
The Sultan's Turret with a Shaft of Light.

The mighty Mahmud, Allah-breathing Lord
That all the misbelieving and black Horde
Of Fears and Sorrows that infest the Soul
Scatters before him with his whirlwind Sword.

http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Rubai ... th_Edition

http://www.sacred-texts.com/isl/bp/bp01.htm
To take into the air my quiet breath;
Now more than ever seems it rich to die,
To cease upon the midnight with no pain,
While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad
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Re: Poets that reader of Keats should like

Postby Raphael » Fri Mar 19, 2010 12:09 am

No, I had not heard of John Clare before! He wrote a poem for dear Junkets too!

TO THE MEMORY OF JOHN KEATS.

THE World, its hopes and fears, have pass'd away;
No more its trifling thou shalt feel or see;
Thy hopes are ripening in a brighter day,
While these left buds thy monument shall be.
When Rancour's aims have past in nought away,
Enlarging specks discern'd in more than thee,
And beauties 'minishing which few display, -
When these are past, true child of Poesy,
Thou shalt survive - Ah, while a being dwells,
With soul, in Nature's joys, to warm like thine,
With eye to view her fascinating spells,
And dream entranced o'er each form divine,
Thy worth, Enthusiast, shall be cherish'd here, -
Thy name with him shall linger, and be dear.


I am reading about him just now- I will have to see if the library has his poems!
I haven't heard of Edward FitzGerald before either though I had heard of Omar Khayyam.
I hadn't been that into poetry until I read John Keats's poems. I had read some of Oscar Wilde's and liked those, but really for the past few years I have been reading novels.
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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