To Eleonore

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To Eleonore

Postby Pjerrot » Fri Aug 06, 2010 2:56 pm

Each passing day
spent in unending death,
and every weary night
indulged in a
most hiddeous deed.

Such is the life
of the monster
that has become a
mainstay in our fantasy.

But, dear lady,
you are of no such thing.

Misfortune seemed your lot:
such trying years
of wishing for your child,
your husband then
taken away too soon,
only to have them
call you mad.

No.

Your true ailment
was much more morbid
than what you
were accused of being.

Crock cures from learnéd men
(with books in hand)
could not spare you
the agony.

It is my fear
that you have been
misunderstood, dear lady,
even in our time.

But the world
shall have its fascination
with the monsters
it makes for itself.
Ah! I will taste that dew, for me ’tis meet,/And when the moon her pallid face discloses,/I’ll gather some by spells, and incantation.
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Re: To Eleonore

Postby Saturn » Fri Aug 06, 2010 5:01 pm

Mary Shelley?

Or have I gotten the wrong end of the stick?
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
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Re: To Eleonore

Postby Pjerrot » Fri Aug 06, 2010 6:17 pm

Saturn wrote:Mary Shelley?

Or have I gotten the wrong end of the stick?


Not quite. I have now looked upon the lines from a more open view and have concluded the same with you, Saturn. I hadn't realized until now the strong similarites in my vague lines connecting the two. The intended subject of the poem was Eleonore von Schwarzenberg.

Much of the informatin here I absorbed through a program called "The Vampire Princess" (for anyone interested, it can be found on youtube). Eleonore was a Viennese Baroque princess (1682-1741) who was desperate to produce a male heir which she finally did at the then miraculous age of 41 -- this was supposedly a sign of witchcraft and it didn't help matters that her doctors told her wolves milk would help produce a son. Her husband was accidentally killed during a hunting party, being shot by Emperor Charles VI. She grew progressively involved in superstitious and mythical cures of all kinds for some unknown illness that had been plaguing her. The sickness prompted doctors to be called in from afar one of whom, I forget who, believed the malady to be caused by a vampire. Eleonore was already fallen in social standing and now the public had cause to search out the so-called vampires. Graves were desecrated and the buried were sometimes decapitated, had stakes driven through their hearts, and the other typical "vampiric cures." Eleonore herself was not buried with the rest of her family and her own son did not show up to her funeral. It is said that she served as the inspiration for Bram Stoker's "Dracula."
Ah! I will taste that dew, for me ’tis meet,/And when the moon her pallid face discloses,/I’ll gather some by spells, and incantation.
Pjerrot
 
Posts: 76
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Re: To Eleonore

Postby Raphael » Thu Aug 12, 2010 10:09 pm

What an interesting poem and story!
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Raphael
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Re: To Eleonore

Postby Pjerrot » Fri Aug 13, 2010 2:32 am

Raphael wrote:What an interesting poem and story!


Thank you Raphael. I felt compelled to show this poor lady some humanity. How terrible that her son was taken from her after her husband's death, her own health deteriorating, and then be accused of having been attacked by a vampire of all things (when it was believed that a vampire could not generally attack royalty or be let into one's home unless invited). Composing this poem gave me the chance to work with something more grave and less maudlin than many of my previous works. And with the seeming vampiric pandemic it was only too appropriate to show a side unseen by many.
Ah! I will taste that dew, for me ’tis meet,/And when the moon her pallid face discloses,/I’ll gather some by spells, and incantation.
Pjerrot
 
Posts: 76
Joined: Mon May 24, 2010 2:29 am

Re: To Eleonore

Postby Raphael » Fri Aug 13, 2010 1:01 pm

Pjerrot wrote:
Raphael wrote:What an interesting poem and story!


Thank you Raphael. I felt compelled to show this poor lady some humanity. How terrible that her son was taken from her after her husband's death, her own health deteriorating, and then be accused of having been attacked by a vampire of all things (when it was believed that a vampire could not generally attack royalty or be let into one's home unless invited). Composing this poem gave me the chance to work with something more grave and less maudlin than many of my previous works. And with the seeming vampiric pandemic it was only too appropriate to show a side unseen by many.


I think she would approve of your support of her Pjerrot! Women back then were accused of all sorts when they tried to study herbal lore, manage their own health and lives.
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: To Eleonore

Postby gstormcrow » Sat Feb 05, 2011 12:37 am

Pjerrot, thank you for another great poem though I must admit I didn't get the whole vampire theme nor the incredibly tragic, real-life story you've outlined until reading yours and Raphael's comments. Always a pleasure to read your inspired poetry.
I'm in love with Osama's Aunt Sally
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