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Ode to a Humminbird in Summer

PostPosted: Mon Sep 20, 2010 6:50 pm
by Ennis
Here's another jewel from Muse Aloft. Thanks in advance for reading the poetry of a young one.

Ode to a Humminbird in Summer

What 'tis more fleeting than a wing beat
Of a hummingbird? Ephemeral, sweet,
Shattering thy summer air as if to be
Some divine messenger of wintry nights.
Frost-glittering, and yearning softly
To reclaim warm meadows as their fated right,
To chill this honeyed air with snow,
To dull the summer's contented glow --
This we know, that summer soon shall fade
And yet, still be remembered, though it bade
A gentle farewell, and swiftly fade
From this sultry, amber-lit glade
Into the hearts of the slumberous few,
Hid in idle fancy 'til the last snowflake falls,
When, at last, sweet spring doth renew
Its reign 'til the last autumn leaf doth fall.


"Frost-glittering" reminds me of a young Keats;
"To chill this honeyed air with snow" reminds me of an older Keats. For some reason, I think of that verse from "Dream After Reading Dante" about Francesca and Paolo -- that line about "snow chilled. . . " Shoot, I can't remember the verse verbatim and I don't have access to Keats's complete poetry here at school. It's frustrating not to know all of Keats by heart!

Re: Ode to a Humminbird in Summer

PostPosted: Fri Oct 01, 2010 11:44 pm
by Raphael
That was good Ennis!

Re: Ode to a Humminbird in Summer

PostPosted: Sun Oct 03, 2010 12:05 pm
by steffen
Hello Ennis, wherever you are, thank you for submitting this richly-crafted poem by Muse Aloft. I take it you're a teacher of English Lit. and loving poetry as you do, with all that overpowering contagious enthusiasm of yours, are capable of passing on the torch even to the extreme of unleashing the gifted talent of at least one of your students "to think in ink" ----- as Mariyn Monroe once famously wrote, surprisingly enough.

Re: Ode to a Humminbird in Summer

PostPosted: Tue Oct 05, 2010 8:15 pm
by Ennis
steffen wrote:Hello Ennis, wherever you are, thank you for submitting this richly-crafted poem by Muse Aloft. I take it you're a teacher of English Lit. and loving poetry as you do, with all that overpowering contagious enthusiasm of yours, are capable of passing on the torch even to the extreme of unleashing the gifted talent of at least one of your students "to think in ink" ----- as Mariyn Monroe once famously wrote, surprisingly enough.


Thank you, Steffen, for your kind comments.