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Enchained

PostPosted: Sat May 05, 2007 9:45 pm
by Saturn
Enchained

Giant Prometheus would despair,
Of the fetters that enchain me.
Titans such adamantine bounds
Would not so easily escape.

The shackles that hold me here
Are mankind's drearest penalty,
Nor men nor Gods are ever free
From this sentence I serve.

My tongue has been stopped
And devils pierce every side.
Daylight is stolen from me
And tears scour my eyes.

I grow ragged in despair,
Filthy, unkempt and wild:
Waiting for a reprieve
I know will never come.

I've choked on any hope,
Abandoned all my dreams
Clung to my last straw
Now just leave me to rot.
_________

PostPosted: Tue May 08, 2007 5:11 am
by dks
I love this:

Giant Prometheus would despair,
Of the fetters that enchain me.
Titans such adamantine bounds
Would not so easily escape.


and this is Plath-esque...

I've choked on any hope,
Abandoned all my dreams
Clung to my last straw
Now just leave me to rot.


I envy your ability to use the Classics allusions...I don't use them for fear of not doing them justice in my meager metaphors. You do a splendid, savory job...combined with that signature Stephen immediacy...love it.

PostPosted: Tue May 08, 2007 9:34 am
by Saturn
I do like my old Classical references and always turn to them when I'm looking for some striking imagery.

My main concern with them is that not everyone knows the myths and the characters as much as I do so some of that impact may be lost on those who don't know the stories so well.

I suppose I like to keep that continuity in poetry, as opposed to the general trend of modern poetry to disregard as irrelevant or unnecessary the great stories of the past which have shaped European literature for thousands of years. They keep me grounded to that venerable poetic tradition, and well I just love those stories and find inspiration and allusions to human emotions and situations that will never change...those stories are truly for all time, not just of their time.

PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2007 11:10 am
by AsphodelElysium
I agree with Denise, the Classical allusions are wonderful. I'm actually fond of using them myself.

I wouldn't worry too much about the impact being lost. Most people who enjoy poetry are going to take the time to reference something they are not familiar with in the poem. Also, a poem will have a different impact each time it is read, so if the meaning may not have been clear the first time, it might be the second time or the third. You have a clear voice as is, anyway, so I think your poems have a lot to offer on several different levels.

The use of Classical allusions is also a very Keatsian thing to do and therefore I am predisposed to be agreeable to it. :)

PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2007 9:42 am
by Saturn
Keats did know his classics for sure. :wink: