Page 2 of 3

PostPosted: Thu May 04, 2006 1:15 am
by dks
If Keats pursued me...I'd...I'd...I...can't even--words fail me--which has only happened to Denise Renee Klabonski about 3 times in her whole entire life...

I'd swoon to death... and dying in his arms would please me all the finer... :oops: :cry: :shock: :lol:

PostPosted: Thu May 04, 2006 2:26 am
by Credo Buffa
Hee hee hee, you're so funny, dks (Or would you prefer to be called Denise? I always feel weird about using people's "real names" in the internet world :P ). :lol:

PostPosted: Thu May 04, 2006 3:01 am
by Malia
dks wrote:If Keats pursued me...I'd...I'd...I...can't even--words fail me--which has only happened to Denise Renee Klabonski about 3 times in her whole entire life...

I'd swoon to death... and dying in his arms would please me all the finer... :oops: :cry: :shock: :lol:


But Keats had VD! In an era when it really couldn't be treated. That thought alone--and the fact that he must have had terrible oral hygene is enough to turn me away. I mean, eeewwww. . . :lol:

PostPosted: Thu May 04, 2006 5:08 am
by Credo Buffa
Well, you all might be interested to know that as a part of this little project, I've done some online research into 19th-century letter writing, and it appears that under only rare circumstances would it be considered appropriate for a woman to write a letter addressed to a man to whom she was not somehow related. Similarly, a man writing a letter to a woman to whom he was not related or courting was apparently taboo. For example, in Pride and Prejudice, we see Mr. Darcy handing his letter to Elizabeth personally rather than by post, because this would be the appropriate action to take when writing a personal letter to a woman not his relation, fiancee, or wife.

Letters strictly of friendship seem to be confined within the sexes. I searched an entire chapter of an early 19th century letter-writing manual (these seem quite amusing: they give sample letters for pretty much anything you could want, from proposing marriage to someone you barely know, to confronting a correspondent on his/her refusal to reply, to addressing someone who is on his/her deathbed) devoted to letters of friendship, and in only one instance is there an example of a woman writing a letter to a man, or vice-versa, except to express sympathy. So it would appear that the ladies on this board will have to bend the rules of etiquette a bit for the sake of this little game. :wink:

PostPosted: Thu May 04, 2006 2:02 pm
by dks
Malia wrote:
dks wrote:If Keats pursued me...I'd...I'd...I...can't even--words fail me--which has only happened to Denise Renee Klabonski about 3 times in her whole entire life...

I'd swoon to death... and dying in his arms would please me all the finer... :oops: :cry: :shock: :lol:


But Keats had VD! In an era when it really couldn't be treated. That thought alone--and the fact that he must have had terrible oral hygene is enough to turn me away. I mean, eeewwww. . . :lol:


Oh, Malia...why'd ya have to douse my fire with that water?? :lol:

PostPosted: Thu May 04, 2006 2:04 pm
by dks
Credo Buffa wrote:Well, you all might be interested to know that as a part of this little project, I've done some online research into 19th-century letter writing, and it appears that under only rare circumstances would it be considered appropriate for a woman to write a letter addressed to a man to whom she was not somehow related. Similarly, a man writing a letter to a woman to whom he was not related or courting was apparently taboo. For example, in Pride and Prejudice, we see Mr. Darcy handing his letter to Elizabeth personally rather than by post, because this would be the appropriate action to take when writing a personal letter to a woman not his relation, fiancee, or wife.

Letters strictly of friendship seem to be confined within the sexes. I searched an entire chapter of an early 19th century letter-writing manual (these seem quite amusing: they give sample letters for pretty much anything you could want, from proposing marriage to someone you barely know, to confronting a correspondent on his/her refusal to reply, to addressing someone who is on his/her deathbed) devoted to letters of friendship, and in only one instance is there an example of a woman writing a letter to a man, or vice-versa, except to express sympathy. So it would appear that the ladies on this board will have to bend the rules of etiquette a bit for the sake of this little game. :wink:


That's so interesting...you know there are always those who pushed the envelope (no pun intended) read the letters of Abelard and Heloise--the 12th Century monk and nun--who were once teacher and student--they had a torrid affair (had a child even) and their correspondence is nothing short of breathtaking... :shock:

PostPosted: Thu May 04, 2006 2:06 pm
by dks
By the way, you guys feel free to call me Denise...

PostPosted: Thu May 04, 2006 4:01 pm
by Malia
Thanks for the info, Credo! Sounds like interesting research. Could you post a few links--I'm especially interested in how to write a marriage proposal to someone I barely know. ;) I have a book called "What Jane Austin Ate and Charles Dickens Knew" that talks all about every-day customs, etc. of the 19th century and there *were* many codes of conduct, to be sure! When I think of Keats's letters (taking into consideration that there are surely gaps in his correspondence) I can only remember a few letters written to girls who were simply aquaintances of his. I think Maryann Jefferey was one of them--and he wrote to her on a business matter--to try and find him a potential place to spend the summer of 1819 in Devon. Otherwise, the women he wrote to were family or Fanny Brawne. Interesting!

I think I'm just going to have to pretend to be someone he knew (like his sister or something! :lol:) when I pen my letter ;)

Denise, sorry to douse your fire earlier :lol: I think I'm just too practical for my own good! (But I'm sure there is a Romantic lurking inside me *somewhere* ;) )

PostPosted: Thu May 04, 2006 10:24 pm
by Saturn
Yes guys I know that in the past of course there are a lot of things which were wrong - the social conventions, the higher mortality and infection rates etc but I was thinking more of teh fact that life was a lot slower and simpler in those days - people had the time to write and read letters and books [well people of Keats and his friends' class anyway].


I'd miss my CDS too much anyway
:wink:

Oh and sanitation - what was it Woody Allen said...?

PostPosted: Thu May 04, 2006 10:25 pm
by Saturn
By the way, I see you all have totally forgotten the purpose of this thread - is no-one willing to pick up the gauntlet and post their own letter? :cry: :roll:

PostPosted: Thu May 04, 2006 10:28 pm
by Malia
Saturn wrote:By the way, I see you all have totally forgotten the purpose of this thread - is no-one willing to pick up the gauntlet and post their own letter? :cry: :roll:


I'll try one, but I won't have time to work on it til the weekend.

PostPosted: Thu May 04, 2006 10:41 pm
by dks
Ditto, here.

PostPosted: Thu May 04, 2006 11:01 pm
by Saturn
There's no rush my friends but this is my thread and I'll cry if I want to :lol:

PostPosted: Thu May 04, 2006 11:07 pm
by Credo Buffa
I'm almost done with mine, Saturn! I was just doing the research because I didn't quite know how I should address or close the letter. In the process, I just found all this other stuff :wink:

Unfortunately, Malia, I didn't keep a good record of the pages I searched. I'm looking back at my search history and trying to find some links, though!

PostPosted: Thu May 04, 2006 11:21 pm
by Saturn
Excellent - I'm looking forward to reading it :D