JOHN KEATS' DEATHBED VISION OF FANNY BRAWNE

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Re: JOHN KEATS' DEATHBED VISION OF FANNY BRAWNE

Postby BrokenLyre » Fri Mar 26, 2010 11:24 pm

I have enjoyed this thread Steffen and others.

I do find Shelly's "Adonais" very beautiful, powerful and deeply moving. Does anyone else feel this way? (Despite some incorrect statements about Keats in the poem). Shelly was a genius with words and saw connections that I would never see. I have always been glad that Shelly knew Keats somewhat and even died with Keats' 1820 volume in his coat pocket. Such a remarkably sad ending to another amazing poet. The tremendous irony of Shelly's last stanza of "Adonais" with his actual dying in a boat on the water is just too stunning.
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Re: JOHN KEATS' DEATHBED VISION OF FANNY BRAWNE

Postby Cybele » Fri Mar 26, 2010 11:43 pm

BrokenLyre wrote:I have enjoyed this thread Steffen and others.

I do find Shelly's "Adonais" very beautiful, powerful and deeply moving. Does anyone else feel this way? (Despite some incorrect statements about Keats in the poem). Shelly was a genius with words and saw connections that I would never see. I have always been glad that Shelly knew Keats somewhat and even died with Keats' 1820 volume in his coat pocket. Such a remarkably sad ending to another amazing poet. The tremendous irony of Shelly's last stanza of "Adonais" with his actual dying in a boat on the water is just too stunning.


RE: Shelley, Keats & "Adonais" --
I think I heard about a lecture on this topic here on this forum. The Romantic Circles Blog said this: "On 19 October 2006, Barbara Charlesworth Gelpi, Professor Emerita at Stanford University and author of Shelley’s Goddess (1992), presented a lecture at Loyola University in Chicago (to a mostly undergraduate student audience) on the topic of “Keats, Shelley, and the ‘Bright Star’.”
But here's a link:
http://www.rc.umd.edu/blog_rc/?p=181 (Sorry if this is redundant information.) I downloaded the MP3 of the lecture some time ago and didn't get around to listening to it until yesterday. (I had to do some software updates on our office computers at work -- I was so happy to have remembered that I had this on my PDA. What could have been an insanely boring afternoon turned into an enjoyable listening experience!)
"The philosopher proves that the philosopher exists. The poet merely enjoys existence."
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Re: JOHN KEATS' DEATHBED VISION OF FANNY BRAWNE

Postby Raphael » Sun Mar 28, 2010 1:13 am

BrokenLyre wrote:I have enjoyed this thread Steffen and others.

I do find Shelly's "Adonais" very beautiful, powerful and deeply moving. Does anyone else feel this way? (Despite some incorrect statements about Keats in the poem). Shelly was a genius with words and saw connections that I would never see. I have always been glad that Shelly knew Keats somewhat and even died with Keats' 1820 volume in his coat pocket. Such a remarkably sad ending to another amazing poet. The tremendous irony of Shelly's last stanza of "Adonais" with his actual dying in a boat on the water is just too stunning.



I agree- Adonais was beautiful and I think well meant. Yes, the dying on the boat was kind of tragically ironic.
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: JOHN KEATS' DEATHBED VISION OF FANNY BRAWNE

Postby PaulW » Sun Apr 04, 2010 1:56 pm

Raphael wrote:
And I see what you mean and share in your thinking when you write: "These poets I think are linking in an experience wider than themselves, so that's why they come up with similar things".


I don't quite understand it but it seems so doesn't it?


Just read this section from W.B. Yeats' essay, The Philosphy of Shelly's Poetry, which can be found in its entirety at http://www.yeatsvision.com/Shelley.html. It verifies your thoughts on the subject of influences, and very "mystical" ones. You're in good company.



That was very interesting- thanks for that- I am not very familiar with Shelleys' poetry. I didn't expect any of it to be mystical as I know he was an athiest and thought he wouldn't be into that- I thought he disliked religion and mysticism.
I wonder if he believed in an afterlife of sorts then?


didn't some of shelley's work acknowledge a mute, perhaps participatory [in some way] presence in landscape/nature? - akin perhaps to that felt by the younger dorothy worsdworth, and realised in her Grasmere Journals? belief in, or acknowledgement of, such a 'presence' plays a key role in romanticism. i presume it's a form of pantheism/pagamism.
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Re: JOHN KEATS' DEATHBED VISION OF FANNY BRAWNE

Postby Raphael » Sun Apr 04, 2010 4:58 pm

didn't some of shelley's work acknowledge a mute, perhaps participatory [in some way] presence in landscape/nature? - akin perhaps to that felt by the younger dorothy worsdworth, and realised in her Grasmere Journals? belief in, or acknowledgement of, such a 'presence' plays a key role in romanticism. i presume it's a form of pantheism/pagamism.


I admit I am not familiar with much of Mr Shelley's work nor those of Ms Wordworth. You are correct in that the spirit of place/presence is inherent in paganism, as it is in shamanic cultures. John wrote about this himself ( in a letter to Tom I think it was) when he was on his walking tour with Brown- how he felt such a presence in nature. One might also call it atmosphere. I myself have found this in certain wild places. It seems less marked in manicured gardens as it does in places left to run wild.
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: JOHN KEATS' DEATHBED VISION OF FANNY BRAWNE

Postby PaulW » Sun Apr 04, 2010 10:47 pm

Raphael wrote:
didn't some of shelley's work acknowledge a mute, perhaps participatory [in some way] presence in landscape/nature? - akin perhaps to that felt by the younger dorothy worsdworth, and realised in her Grasmere Journals? belief in, or acknowledgement of, such a 'presence' plays a key role in romanticism. i presume it's a form of pantheism/pagamism.


I admit I am not familiar with much of Mr Shelley's work nor those of Ms Wordworth. You are correct in that the spirit of place/presence is inherent in paganism, as it is in shamanic cultures. John wrote about this himself ( in a letter to Tom I think it was) when he was on his walking tour with Brown- how he felt such a presence in nature. One might also call it atmosphere. I myself have found this in certain wild places. It seems less marked in manicured gardens as it does in places left to run wild.


perhaps 'atmosphere' combines with the poetic imagination of the Romantics to produce something with a bit more meaning to them... e.g. the concept of panthesim [or, to some, "the divine"].

there's a mention of pantheism and Shelley here:

http://reason2romanticism.blogspot.com/ ... heism.html

and Keats has his say here :-)

http://www.pantheism.net/paul/poets.htm

Scroll down on that site for Keats.
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Re: JOHN KEATS' DEATHBED VISION OF FANNY BRAWNE

Postby Raphael » Mon Apr 05, 2010 12:26 am

Thanks for all that. But pantheism and polytheism are a bit different to each other.. :wink:
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: JOHN KEATS' DEATHBED VISION OF FANNY BRAWNE

Postby Ennis » Thu Jun 10, 2010 8:56 pm

Steffen --

My, that was beautiful. May I print it and add it to my collection of poems about our dear poet?
"But if you will fully love me, though there may be some fire, 'twill not be more than we can bear when moistened and bedewed with Pleasures." JK to FB 08.07.1819
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Re: JOHN KEATS' DEATHBED VISION OF FANNY BRAWNE

Postby steffen » Fri Jun 11, 2010 8:22 pm

Hello Ennis,
Thanks for that. Yes, please feel free to print the poem out. I'm glad you enjoyed it. And welcome to this site.
Have a happy summer,
Jim
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Re: JOHN KEATS' DEATHBED VISION OF FANNY BRAWNE

Postby Ennis » Sat Jun 12, 2010 12:15 am

Steffen --

Thanks ever so much!!
"But if you will fully love me, though there may be some fire, 'twill not be more than we can bear when moistened and bedewed with Pleasures." JK to FB 08.07.1819
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Re: JOHN KEATS' DEATHBED VISION OF FANNY BRAWNE

Postby titian dj » Tue Jan 11, 2011 2:23 am

Hi, Jim

I thoroughly enjoyed this poem and sensed the voice of the Romantics throughout. The diction hits the mark imo because it reflects the substance of time and place. The sadness is palpable, in a gentle melancholic way, and the love pervades/penetrates every line. S1 alone is rich in beauty and deep thought; there is a truth sitting hand in hand with love.

S2 extends the sentiments of S1 through the effective employment of metaphor, and draws the reader into the heart of the poem.

S3 examines the senses wonderfully: sight, scent, touch and taste are used to great effect and I note that scent receives the 'basil' modifier'. Keats was known for his descriptive poems but your restraint yields dividends.

S4 brings the poem to a reminiscent philosophical close, an effective close and one to ponder.

Well, as I said, this was one to enjoy and return to.

Best,

Bri

steffen wrote:My dearest, my once-bright star:
Would you were wholly aware
of how your everpresence,
the persistence of the vision of you,
penetrates every fold and furrow
of the obscene rags and scraps
of this, my posthumous life.

No more than a rivulet,
this presence of yours,
sometimes puddling,
then welling up again
to thread its way
through the underwood
of the twisted twigs and branches
of my mind, my all, my everything.

It nudges and murmurs
in an obscure, jumbled syntax,
stirring half-remembered intimacies
of the sight, the sweet-basil-scent,
the touch, the feel, the taste of you.

But in the afterglow of those bright days,
dark residues of covert treachery and betrayal
float up from the troubled pools of memory,
and I have learned,
as I lie here alone with the Dryads,
that what is known can never be unknown,
and yet what has been seems yet to be,
but barren and stripped of life,
full of the boundless mystery of loss.
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Re: JOHN KEATS' DEATHBED VISION OF FANNY BRAWNE

Postby steffen » Sat Jan 15, 2011 1:39 pm

Hi Bri,
Thank you -- you're very kind --- can´t thank you enough! I keep returning here to go over your analysis of "Keats' Deathbed Vision", moved by the insight and depth of your critique.

The overpowering lines quoted in the final stanza (sans quotation marks so as not to break the flow) are taken verbatim from a letter of Keats': "And I have learned that what is known can never be unknown, and yet what has been seems yet to be, but barren and stripped of life". This phrase hit home with a force and led me into a veritable labyrinth of personal introspection. I immersed myself in K's poetry, letters and biographies. I re-read "Darkling I Listen--The Last Days and Death of John Keats", by John Evangelist Walsh. The chronology of Joseph Severn, Keats' Boswell, is nothing less than the colophon of the great Poet's life, infusing it with a terrible beauty.

The writing began to take form gradually over a 3-month period, with its share of false starts and multiple revisions. I've been left with a feeling of greater proximity to the Poet, something akin to friendship, something I want to keep close and nurture.


.
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