Keats The Movie - the news we've all been waiting for....

Join in the discussion of the 2009 film Bright Star.

Moderators: Saturn, Malia

Postby Saturn » Mon Feb 26, 2007 10:44 pm

And how about a reprint Ms/Mrs Ward? :wink:

Bate unfortunately is alas no longer with us:

http://www.ourcivilisation.com/smartboa ... /about.htm
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
Saturn
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 3940
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:16 am

Postby Malia » Wed Apr 25, 2007 9:48 pm

Everyone, here is a recent article from the Telegraph on-line about the upcoming Bright Star movie :) Very interesting stuff.


Bright stars portray Keats's doomed love
By Amy Iggulden
Last Updated: 12:48am BST 10/04/2007



Bright Star, would I were steadfast as thou art -
Not in lone splendour hung aloft the night,
And watching, with eternal lids apart,
Like Nature's patient sleepless Eremite,
The moving waters at their priestlike task
Of pure ablution round earth's human shores,
Or gazing on the new soft-fallen mask
Of snow upon the mountains and the moors-
No-yet still steadfast, still unchangeable,
Pillow'd upon my fair love's ripening breast,
To feel for ever its soft fall and swell,
Awake for ever in a sweet unrest,
Still, still to hear her tender-taken breath,
And so live ever-or else swoon to death.

John Keats

A young couple meet, fall in love and overcome all obstacles until untimely death wrenches the man from his lover's grasp.


Ben Whishaw, left, will play John Keats in the movie whose title is taken from his poem
The plotline, for the Oscar-winning director Jane Campion's new film, hardly sounds original.

Except that the boy in question is John Keats, the girl is Fanny Brawne, and their doomed love affair inspired some of the most beautiful lines in English poetry.

Such ingredients should ensure that Bright Star, which begins filming in September and stars the up and coming British actor Ben Whishaw, 26, becomes a major literary cinema hit.

It follows a resurgence in the popularity of literary biopics, including Becoming Jane, starring Anne Hathaway as Jane Austen, Miss Potter, with Renee Zellweger as Beatrix Potter, and The Libertine and Finding Neverland, in which Johnny Depp played the Earl of Rochester and James Barrie respectively.

Bright Star will tell the tale of how the young Keats first set eyes on Miss Brawne as she was walking in her Hampstead garden, in north London, in the early 19th century.


Fanny Brawne, who was the inspiration for Bright Star, will be played by Abbie Cornish
She lived next door with her family and was initially regarded as a "minx" by Keats. The poet was enjoying a period of intense creativity between 1818 and 1820, producing works including Ode to a Nightingale and The Eve of St Agnes.

But, baffling as she was, Miss Brawne eventually won Keats's heart, and in October 1819, the young lovers became privately engaged.

Then tragedy struck, when Keats fell ill with tuberculosis and left Britain for Italy to convalesce in a warmer climate.

Struggling with an illness that would prove to be terminal, he wrote of his love for Miss Brawne to a friend: "The persuasion that I shall see her no more will kill me... I can bear to die - I cannot bear to leave her... O that I could be buried where she lives. It surprises me that the human heart is capable of such misery."

He was never to see her again, dying in Rome in February 1821, aged 25 and largely unrecognised as the celebrated poet he would later become. His final poem was called To Fanny.

For her part, Miss Brawne went into mourning for three years. She later married and had children but never took off the ring that Keats had given her, and never revealed her past to her husband.

Yesterday Ben Whishaw, who came to fame through his role as Hamlet in Trevor Nunn's Old Vic production in 2004, said he was expecting the portrayal of the intensity of Keats's love to be demanding.

"I have never done a real love story before. Keats was an incredibly passionate man, capable of very intense love, so that will be a challenge. [But] I do have some experience of that to draw on.

"I was really thrilled to be asked to do this film. Before I auditioned for Jane [Campion, the writer and director] I didn't know very much about him, but I have been doing a lot of reading and I know that he was a beautiful human being and poet, it will be a privilege to play him."

Before filming begins for the Pathe production, in September, he will play a role in a big screen adaptation of Brideshead Revisited. The young Fanny Brawne will be played by the 24-year-old Australian actress Abbie Cornish, who was made famous for her role as a 16-year-old runaway in the independent film Somersault.

Mr Whishaw said: "I have heard that she is really astonishing, something really special."

The film's title, Bright Star, comes from a love poem for Miss Brawne which Keats wrote in the flyleaf of his copy of the works of Shakespeare.

It begins: "Bright star, would I were steadfast as thou art" and finishes with the line: "And so live ever - or else swoon to death."

Jane Campion, who was born in New Zealand and lives in Australia, is best known for The Piano, for which she won the Academy Award for best screenplay in 1994. She is said to regard Keats as "somebody who had something almost angelic about him".

Note from Malia: At least this shows Campion doesn't see Keats as as too much of a misogynistic beast as she might other male characters who have populated her movies. Looks like she's really going to focus on a "Romeo and Juliet"-type tragic romance. Promising! :)
Stay Awake!
--Anthony deMello
User avatar
Malia
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 1606
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2004 12:55 am
Location: Washington State, USA

Postby Saturn » Wed Apr 25, 2007 10:58 pm

Very encouraging Malia thanks for that bit of info :D
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
Saturn
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 3940
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:16 am

Postby AsphodelElysium » Thu Apr 26, 2007 7:42 pm

It does look promising, Malia. Thanks for sharing.

Two questions, though, because the editor in me is rearing her ugly head. Didn't John first meet Fanny at a social gathering? Also, wasn't "Bright Star" his last poem? Please someone correct me if I am wrong and my apologies for being a nit-picky weirdo. :?
"Let me not wander in a barren dream,
But, when I am consumed in the fire,
Give me new Phoenix wings to fly at my desire."
User avatar
AsphodelElysium
Calidore
 
Posts: 353
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2007 2:58 am
Location: Virginia

Postby Malia » Thu Apr 26, 2007 8:27 pm

AsphodelElysium wrote:It does look promising, Malia. Thanks for sharing.

Two questions, though, because the editor in me is rearing her ugly head. Didn't John first meet Fanny at a social gathering? Also, wasn't "Bright Star" his last poem? Please someone correct me if I am wrong and my apologies for being a nit-picky weirdo. :?


From what I can remember (and I'll have to check my Keats bios to be sure), Keats met Fanny one day while on a visit to the Dilkes. He had recently returned early from his walking tour with Brown and, while taking a short break from nursing his brother Tom, he decided to walk down the hill and visit his friends.The Dilkes, of course, lived in the part of Wentworth Place that would one day be occupied by the Brawnes. At the time of their first meeting, the Brawnes were renting out Brown's half of the house. Maria Dilke had become good friends with the Brawnes (and especially Fanny) and she made the introductions. So, Keats did not meet Fanny at a party or social event, per se, but on a casual visit to the Dilkes'. :)

As far as "Bright Star" being Keats's last poem, it was first drafted some time before he stopped writing poetry. Off the top of my head, I cannot remember just when it was written, probably in 1819, not too long after first meeting Fanny--or perhaps sometime that summer, as in a letter to her he mentions praying to her "star like a heathen", words which echo the poem. The old story goes that Severn caught him composing the poem on the Maria Crowther (thus it was thought of for some time as Keats's last poem) but the truth was that he was re-reading the poem he'd already written there previously (before he left England, he'd copied the poem in one of his books, and Fanny had copied it in another book--it was a way for them to stay connected in spirit). He was so wrapped up in the poem and, I'm sure, in the tragic notion he would die parted from Fanny forever, that Severn misunderstood exactly what he saw. (Keats was never very intimate with Severn and Severn wasn't the most perceptive of men, anyway.) Keats's last poem was probably "To Fanny"--pretty tortured work, disjointed, and it reflects in a terrible honesty, the downward spiral of his health--both physical and mental.
Stay Awake!
--Anthony deMello
User avatar
Malia
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 1606
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2004 12:55 am
Location: Washington State, USA

Postby Credo Buffa » Thu Apr 26, 2007 8:41 pm

It is indeed a very uplifting article to read, Malia. It's good to know that both Ms. Campion and Mr. Wishaw appear to be treating our dear Keats with the utmost respect.
"Holy Kleenex, Batman! It was right under our nose and we blew it!"
User avatar
Credo Buffa
Lamia
 
Posts: 935
Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2005 1:42 am
Location: Minnesota

Postby AsphodelElysium » Sat Apr 28, 2007 11:19 pm

Thanks Malia! I was just wondering because of the references the article made. I know John watched Fanny in her garden but I didn't think that was the first time he saw/met her. I wasn't sure about the other one. A lot of the critical editions of his work cite "Bright Star" as his final sonnet, but it makes more sense that it was "For Fanny." Thanks again for sharing the article. I do believe we all have something to look forward to. :D
"Let me not wander in a barren dream,
But, when I am consumed in the fire,
Give me new Phoenix wings to fly at my desire."
User avatar
AsphodelElysium
Calidore
 
Posts: 353
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2007 2:58 am
Location: Virginia

Postby dks » Sun Apr 29, 2007 5:37 pm

Malia wrote:"I was really thrilled to be asked to do this film. Before I auditioned for Jane [Campion, the writer and director] I didn't know very much about him, but I have been doing a lot of reading and I know that he was a beautiful human being and poet, it will be a privilege to play him."


You damn straight, Benny!! :lol: Hmmm, yes...this is promising. Could it be that Miss Campion has allowed her ultra-feminist heart to be thawed a bit by our man? And how could she help it? It may have surprised her to know that had she lived back then, she, too, would have felt his presence to be incorporeal as if moved by some "spells and incantations." As are we all...I feel good about this article--thanks so much, Miss Malia, for posting it.

Keats did indeed meet Fanny at the Dilkes. He was introduced to her there. His last poem was indeed "To Fanny." Also noteworthy is that "Bright Star" was written as marginalia poetry--on a cover of one of his copies of Shakepeare--its composition date is not entirely clear--Gittings states that it could pertain to both Fanny and Isabella Jones--as it was probably composed about the time he had an encounter with Ms. Jones and his first meeting with Fanny--which did not produce strong, effusive feelings straight away for him...in any case, it is interesting to note. Gittings's bio is probably the best with regard to Keats's experiences with love and his relationship with Fanny altogether.
"I am certain of nothing but the holiness of the heart's affections and the Truth of Imagination."
User avatar
dks
Dante
 
Posts: 1469
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2006 6:14 am
Location: Texas

Postby Credo Buffa » Wed Jun 20, 2007 4:22 am

I found this new, brief description of the movie today that gives us some more specific info about how Ms. Campion intends to approach the story:

BRIGHT STAR tells the story of the great romantic poet John Keats, through the eyes of his love and inspiration - Fanny Brawn. Inspired by the actual love letters between the couple and Keats’ sublime poetry, BRIGHT STAR will reveal a great untold love story from the heart of one of literature’s most loved and tragic figures. It promises to be a watershed film from one of the world's most acclaimed filmmakers.


So the "feminist" bent predicted by some of the folks here might be projected in the POV rather than taken out on Keats. Though I wonder what this will do for his time in Italy. How much of it will we actually get to see?
"Holy Kleenex, Batman! It was right under our nose and we blew it!"
User avatar
Credo Buffa
Lamia
 
Posts: 935
Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2005 1:42 am
Location: Minnesota

Postby Saturn » Wed Jun 20, 2007 3:55 pm

Credo Buffa wrote:
So the "feminist" bent predicted by some of the folks here might be projected in the POV


What do you mean by POV? :?

Thanks for the new info now its sounds more and more promising. :D
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
Saturn
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 3940
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:16 am

Postby Credo Buffa » Wed Jun 20, 2007 4:29 pm

POV = point of view

That article spelled Brawne incorrectly though, didn't it. :?
"Holy Kleenex, Batman! It was right under our nose and we blew it!"
User avatar
Credo Buffa
Lamia
 
Posts: 935
Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2005 1:42 am
Location: Minnesota

Postby Saturn » Wed Jun 20, 2007 4:34 pm

Credo Buffa wrote:POV = point of view

That article spelled Brawne incorrectly though, didn't it. :?


:oops:

Journalists never do their research they just use google these days I expect
:lol:
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
Saturn
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 3940
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:16 am

Postby Credo Buffa » Thu Jun 21, 2007 1:01 am

Still, you'd think that the first results that would come up on Google would have the correct spelling. :?

Can't trust anything these days, can you? :roll:
"Holy Kleenex, Batman! It was right under our nose and we blew it!"
User avatar
Credo Buffa
Lamia
 
Posts: 935
Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2005 1:42 am
Location: Minnesota

Postby Malia » Mon Jul 23, 2007 7:47 pm

Hey there, wendyculpepper :)
Yes, I agree, a Keats movie is so exciting. I've thought for *years* that Keats's life would make a fantastic, tragic movie. I think that this movie is going to be a lot more about the romance than Keats's poetry (in an attempt to draw in a bigger audience, I'd imagine). And from what we know, the movie is written from the perspective of Fanny Brawne, not Keats himself. So, that will be interesting to see. I agree that the actor chosen for Keats doesn't look exactly like the images we have of the real Keats, but makeup and wardrobe can do wonders. I am happy that they chose a *young* person to play Keats. To me, that was of utmost importance. Anyway, great to see you on the message board hope to "read" more from you again :)
Stay Awake!
--Anthony deMello
User avatar
Malia
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 1606
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2004 12:55 am
Location: Washington State, USA

Postby fleshyniteshade » Sun Aug 05, 2007 4:39 pm

what irony that the guy playing keats is just older than keat's age of death.

I wonder what the moment was like when Keats propose to fanny. What did he say, did he read her one of his poems? That is the scene I am most intent on seeing assuming it is done.
"aye, my envious dreams do shyly express thy tenderous lips fairly laced with sensous honey and I like aroused virgins dwell upon such dining"
fleshyniteshade
 
Posts: 28
Joined: Sun Oct 30, 2005 12:16 pm
Location: Laramie, Wyoming

PreviousNext

Return to BRIGHT STAR

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 0 guests

cron