Keats refered to in Cold Mountain.

Discussion on the works of John Keats.

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Keats refered to in Cold Mountain.

Postby Saturn » Fri Nov 26, 2004 10:50 pm

I've been reading the novel Cold Mountain and was surprised to come across a reference to Keats.
Here it is:

"She thought about the refrain of a tune Stobrod had sung that night, a ragged love song. Its ultimate line was: Come back to me is my request. Stobrod could not have uttered it with more conviction had it been one of the profounder lines of Endymion. Ada had to admit that, at least now and again, just saying what your heart felt, straight and simple and unguarded, could be more useful than four thousand lines of John Keats."

Just thought people might be interested, that's all.

Has anyone else spotted Keats' references in surprising places??

I really should get out more...

Who gives a shit??

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Here's a reference to Keats

Postby MonroeDoctrine » Sat Dec 04, 2004 5:22 pm

Guess what poem,

"Though their days have hurried by
Let us two a burden try."

And why is this actually a profound statement?
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Postby Saturn » Sat Dec 04, 2004 10:22 pm

I give up - where's it from?
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Postby jfk » Sun Dec 05, 2004 3:29 pm

It's a Keats poem about Robin hood I think...and the passing of the freedom they had. There is a marvellous line in the poem which goes something (!!) like this:

Honor to LIttle John
and the Horse he rode upon"

Am I correct?
A beacon in the starry sky, this man so dazzling
did not fly from here in a chariot of gold,
but left our world on a melancholic wing
and fled the sorrow that makes men old.
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That's right

Postby MonroeDoctrine » Wed Dec 08, 2004 2:53 am

That's right it's Robin Hood to a friend! It's one of my favorites, I argue that it is positing a challenge to people to do something adventurous in their lives.
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Postby Saturn » Fri Mar 04, 2005 11:00 am

I've just read Ian McEWan's Enduring love and one of the characters in it is a Keats scholar.


Does anybody else have any other Keats references in novels, films, T.V. etc :?:
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Postby Becky » Mon Mar 14, 2005 12:47 pm

Jane Eyre.

Also, Our Mutual Friend seems to take references from Keats life, but maybe I'm just being fanciful. Wives and Daughters almost definitely.

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Postby Despondence » Thu Apr 21, 2005 4:46 am

Completely off the wall, but I couldn't stop my inner goblin from juming up and down for joy when I heard it the first time...

"500 mil i snön
Ett UFO över sjön
Och i en blixt ser jag Keats
Stå brevid Baudelaire"


Enh....we need a babel fish here (my own translation):

500 miles in the snow
A UFO above the lake
And in a flash of lightning Keats
Next to Budelaire


Don't have a clue what it's suppsed to mean. From a song on the new album by Kent (swedish band - great album, btw :D) And Mary Shelley gets a mention in the song too.
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Postby Saturn » Thu Apr 21, 2005 8:58 am

Cool 8)
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Postby Becky » Thu Apr 21, 2005 9:33 am

Byron and Shelley were on Blackadder last night, as was someone who looked like Keats but got called Coleridge in the credits. Well, I found it rather amusing...it was the one with the dictionary
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Postby Saturn » Thu Apr 21, 2005 10:13 am

Yeah, but it was technically anachronistic - they weren't even born when that Blackadder series was set. Plus it shows them as totally one-dimensional carciatures, but hey it's comedy :roll:

Great show though - love Blackadder.

"I have a cunning plan...as cunning as afox that's just been made professor of Cunning at Oxford University" :wink: :wink:
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Postby Becky » Thu Apr 21, 2005 12:05 pm

One hates to seem Baldrickesque, but when was it set then, exactly? :P
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Postby Fred » Thu Apr 21, 2005 4:15 pm

sorry but where was this blackadder on??
Ive never seen it but been told to so yepp when was this?
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Postby Despondence » Fri Apr 22, 2005 5:36 am

Hm. Don't remember that episode...and I'm supposed to be a fan... But if it was in the third season (Blackadder III, Regency period) I guess the time period could be roughly right. Drat. Now I have to get the dvds just to check...:)
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Postby Saturn » Fri Apr 22, 2005 9:29 pm

It was actually set pre-French Revolution, well the costumes are all wigs and frocks which went out of fashion soon after - too many wigs ended up in baskets :lol:

Plus the POrince regent by Byron and Shelley's day was a huge fat bloke of about fifty, not a skinny nincompoop :roll:
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