ODE TO A NIGHTINGALE

Discussion on the works of John Keats.

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ODE TO A NIGHTINGALE

Postby Guest » Fri May 16, 2003 12:49 am

How did ODE TO A NIGHTINGALE affect society in the early ages does anyone know that.
Guest
 

YES

Postby BOB » Mon May 19, 2003 1:49 pm

Ode to a Nightingale was at the forefront of revealing the problem of manic depression in the 18th century. It brought about a massive increase in the prescription of the 'drug' Gratuite Boddice, which is Latinate for 'free soul'. It was prescribed by the apothacary in many towns, which of course were illegal, and resulted in many killings and brutalities.
It also made people more aware of the fact that nature was the only aspect of life which could save their souls, as it is the only great pleasure, along with art of course in a Grecian Urn. This resulted in many of the potions from the apothacary being made from natural sources, which often meant poison berries, and faeces.
The significance of Ode To A Nightingale on society, was that it resulted in death. Many people became depressed, many were arrested, and many died through poisoning.
BOB
 

RE: Ode to a Nightingale

Postby Rich Roach » Fri May 30, 2003 2:51 am

Ode to a Nightingale is full of vivid imagery and synesthesia. Keats's works were not popular in his time. It was well after his death that people began noticing his work, besides Shelley's famous poem. The introspective nature of the ode gave it an immediacy that future admirers of Keats's work used as inspiration - suddenly the workings of an individual's mind, the need for an escape from reality, and the intricacies of the human intellect became fit subjects for poems, which I think led eventually to the modernist movement at the close of the Victorian Era.

It's a tough but interesting question. These are just some of my views.


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RE: Ode to a Nightingale

Postby Rich Roach » Fri May 30, 2003 2:51 am

Ode to a Nightingale is full of vivid imagery and synesthesia. Keats's works were not popular in his time. It was well after his death that people began noticing his work, besides Shelley's famous poem. The introspective nature of the ode gave it an immediacy that future admirers of Keats's work used as inspiration - suddenly the workings of an individual's mind, the need for an escape from reality, and the intricacies of the human intellect became fit subjects for poems, which I think led eventually to the modernist movement at the close of the Victorian Era.

It's a tough but interesting question. These are just some of my views.


Rich
User avatar
Rich Roach
 
Posts: 11
Joined: Fri May 30, 2003 2:36 am


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