Gripus

Discussion on the works of John Keats.

Moderators: Saturn, Malia

Gripus

Postby Raphael » Thu Feb 18, 2010 5:20 pm

I found a nice (hardback) 1955 edition of our dear poet's works in a second hand bookshop on Monday. For £5,00 it was definitely coming home with me! It is the best edition I now have as it is truly the complete works (despite my modern edition saying it is (as it has a few missing that are in my old 50's Penguin selected works). It has Gripus at the end- found by Amy Lowel it is said - does anyone know anything more about it? Whose hand was it in? The notes say it may not be written by John. Upon reading it it does read complete, but more could have been added ( or meant to have been added). It is quite funny and seems to have been meant to be a comedy.
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
User avatar
Raphael
Milton
 
Posts: 1845
Joined: Mon Oct 19, 2009 6:10 pm
Location: wandering Keats' poetry

Re: Grippa

Postby Raphael » Fri Feb 19, 2010 3:53 pm

I made a typo- it should be GRIPUS. :oops:
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
User avatar
Raphael
Milton
 
Posts: 1845
Joined: Mon Oct 19, 2009 6:10 pm
Location: wandering Keats' poetry

Re: Gripus

Postby Saturn » Fri Feb 19, 2010 6:29 pm

Edited it for you Raphael.

I was puzzled by that name myself, sounded like a particularly strong Russian vodka or something. :mrgreen:
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
Saturn
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 3939
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:16 am

Re: Gripus

Postby Sid13 » Fri Feb 19, 2010 8:51 pm

Not much is known about the Gripus fragment. According to Lowell, it was found in one of the three notebooks of Keats material that Woodhouse kept. It has no given title, or date, or authorship. Lowell writes that it "is not in Keats's handwriting. I am not prepared to say in whose writing it is without more study than I have yet been able to accord it." But she adds that most of the copies in Woodhouse's notebook are transcripts written by someone other than Keats, adding, "Woodhouse's statement that all the poems in his book were by Keats unless otherwise labelled."

It is not included in the Modern Library edition I have, but John Barnard sticks it at the end of the Penguin edition as a "doubtful attribution."

Lowell speculated that Keats wrote it in the late summer of 1819, around the same time he and Brown were doing Otho the Great, hoping to make some money off it, inspired by the fact that Reynolds had just had a musical comedy performed on stage. But Barnard seems to think it was just a private joke, the Gripus / Bridget relationship being a parody of that of Brown and Abigail O'Donohue.

If Keats ever planned to finish it and try to sell it, it is strange that he never refers to it in any of his letters, and that Brown and his other friends never mention it either.
Sid13
 
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed Sep 16, 2009 1:48 am
Location: San Jose, California

Re: Gripus

Postby Raphael » Sat Feb 20, 2010 4:27 pm

Saturn wrote:Edited it for you Raphael.

I was puzzled by that name myself, sounded like a particularly strong Russian vodka or something. :mrgreen:


Thanks Saturn! I wouldn't know about the vodka. :wink:
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
User avatar
Raphael
Milton
 
Posts: 1845
Joined: Mon Oct 19, 2009 6:10 pm
Location: wandering Keats' poetry

Re: Gripus

Postby Raphael » Sat Feb 20, 2010 4:31 pm

Sid13 wrote:Not much is known about the Gripus fragment. According to Lowell, it was found in one of the three notebooks of Keats material that Woodhouse kept. It has no given title, or date, or authorship. Lowell writes that it "is not in Keats's handwriting. I am not prepared to say in whose writing it is without more study than I have yet been able to accord it." But she adds that most of the copies in Woodhouse's notebook are transcripts written by someone other than Keats, adding, "Woodhouse's statement that all the poems in his book were by Keats unless otherwise labelled."

It is not included in the Modern Library edition I have, but John Barnard sticks it at the end of the Penguin edition as a "doubtful attribution."

Lowell speculated that Keats wrote it in the late summer of 1819, around the same time he and Brown were doing Otho the Great, hoping to make some money off it, inspired by the fact that Reynolds had just had a musical comedy performed on stage. But Barnard seems to think it was just a private joke, the Gripus / Bridget relationship being a parody of that of Brown and Abigail O'Donohue.

If Keats ever planned to finish it and try to sell it, it is strange that he never refers to it in any of his letters, and that Brown and his other friends never mention it either.


I am not convinced by all this information ( thanks for this Sid) that John actually wrote it- I wonder why he never mentioned it? But then he didn't mention all his poems in his letters- eg the one about the robin. I think the theory it was pasrody of Brown fits fairly well.Maybe it was written for a joke and never meant to be seen by anyone but him and Brown.
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
User avatar
Raphael
Milton
 
Posts: 1845
Joined: Mon Oct 19, 2009 6:10 pm
Location: wandering Keats' poetry


Return to Poems, Odes and Plays

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests