Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Join in the discussion of the 2009 film Bright Star.

Moderators: Saturn, Malia

Re: Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Postby harvest » Mon Apr 26, 2010 1:46 pm

i do believe that was it yes. quite powerful indeed. i always wonder why directors makes decisions to cut scenes. then.... they always add them to the "deleted scens" specials so we know they DO want them to be seen :)
Now a soft kiss - Aye, by that kiss, I vow an endless bliss. ~ j. keats
User avatar
harvest
 
Posts: 56
Joined: Sat Apr 24, 2010 3:56 pm
Location: My Love is selfish - I cannot breathe without you.

Re: Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Postby Raphael » Mon Apr 26, 2010 1:52 pm

harvest wrote:i do believe that was it yes. quite powerful indeed. i always wonder why directors makes decisions to cut scenes. then.... they always add them to the "deleted scens" specials so we know they DO want them to be seen :)



Yes- I think this was taken out as Jane had decided not to focus on John's passionate side and it was slightly out of odds with the rest of the way he was portrayed.
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
User avatar
Raphael
Milton
 
Posts: 1845
Joined: Mon Oct 19, 2009 6:10 pm
Location: wandering Keats' poetry

Re: Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Postby harvest » Mon Apr 26, 2010 5:51 pm

i agree.

another fav. scene of mine , is while @ christmas dinner...when he reaches over gently & touches her hand. really, there is so much conveyed in simple, slight motions in this film ~ i love that about it.
Now a soft kiss - Aye, by that kiss, I vow an endless bliss. ~ j. keats
User avatar
harvest
 
Posts: 56
Joined: Sat Apr 24, 2010 3:56 pm
Location: My Love is selfish - I cannot breathe without you.

Re: Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Postby Raphael » Mon Apr 26, 2010 6:11 pm

harvest wrote:i agree.

another fav. scene of mine , is while @ christmas dinner...when he reaches over gently & touches her hand. really, there is so much conveyed in simple, slight motions in this film ~ i love that about it.


Agreed! I saw an interview with Jane on you tube and she said some of the way she works is to let the actors follow things naturally, outside of the script and Ben did that without Abbey expecting it- so her reaction is surprise ( in her role as Fanny) to make it more "real".
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
User avatar
Raphael
Milton
 
Posts: 1845
Joined: Mon Oct 19, 2009 6:10 pm
Location: wandering Keats' poetry

Re: Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Postby Saturn » Sun May 09, 2010 1:37 am

After prevaricating for several weeks, ummming and ahhing should I or should I not, about a week ago I finally sat down and watched Bright Star.

Despite all my previous reservations, concerns and problems with the casting and other issues, I was quite frankly left emotionally devastated by it, in the truest sense of that word. It was both beautifully acted and written, and ravishing to look at.

I think partly it was just, after reading about Keats, so many biographies, reading the poems again and again over the years, now to finally see his life, to see him being portrayed on film was almost overwhelmingly an emotional moment, and the performances, music and script just brought home the tragedy of Keats and Fanny's touching, but doomed relationship.

It was all I expected it to be, and much, much better than I feared it would be.

Although it is very much a film more about Fanny than Keats himself, you do get a sense of how equally difficult and strenuous that whole time was for her, as much as it was for Keats. It was just so understated and realistically portrayed that it would be a hard heart, and a soulless one too that did not find the delicate, beautiful blossoming of their relationship touching, and he final tragedy truly heartbreaking in the extreme.

Well done Jane Campion, you've brought a story to life I think most felt was either unfulfilmable, or not dramatic enough to be seen on the screen.

Now when are you going to take a similar stab at Mary and Percy Shelly's equally tragic story? :wink:
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
Saturn
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 3939
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:16 am

Re: Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Postby Saturn » Sun May 09, 2010 1:50 am

P.S. Brown's antipathy [and accent] was somewhat overdone, but I think that was merely for dramatic purposes; in drama there must be a protagonist and an antagonist, therein lies the drama. Paul Schneider performed very well, even when ranting termagant-like. in his quieter, more playful moments you could see a bit of what the real Brown must have been like, and why Keats valued him as a friend.

Abbie and Ben were great as Fanny and Keats, I overlooked all my petty objections [Ben Wishaw's hair, Abbie Cornish being perhaps far too pretty etc] and just went with the roles and seeing them play out this relationship slowly unfolding and then swiftly falling apart was a joy; their subtle and nuanced performances really made me believe it, more than I thought possible.

In other words, If I had a hat, I'd eat it, and my head too, I'm pleasantly surprised at how good the film was.

Anyone holding back, or weighed down by their objections should forget everything they know, or don't know about Keats, even if you know nothing about Keats, and walk away knowing less, this is a great film that deserves to be seen and widely appreciated.
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
Saturn
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 3939
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:16 am

Re: Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Postby BrokenLyre » Sun May 09, 2010 6:19 am

Hello Saturn,

I am so glad that you finally saw the movie! I couldn't agree with you more. I was so glad to have someone else look past the critical elements and just enjoy seeing and hearing Keats on film. It's actually better the second time as your expectations narrow to the actual movie. I loved the feel of it and the joy I had in hearing Keats's words on screen was stunning and wonderful. I thought I'd never see it.

Really, just glad you enjoyed it. Thanks for writing out your thoughts for us.

I just can't get over the shock of actually seeing a movie on Keats and hearing his words. It is a treasure that I cannot express.
"Come... dry your eyes, for you are life, rarer than a quark and unpredictable beyond the dreams of Heisenberg; the clay in which the forces that shape all things leave their fingerprints most clearly. Dry your eyes... and let's go home."
BrokenLyre
Endymion
 
Posts: 592
Joined: Wed Jan 07, 2009 1:24 am
Location: New York State

Re: Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Postby marwood » Sun May 09, 2010 11:42 am

Glad you enjoyed it Saturn. You would have to have a heart of stone not to be moved.
It was the only time at the end of a movie that I can remember, when the final credits came up
no one rushed to the exit, not one person moved until the final word was spoken, quite a few folk
were dabbing at their eye's on the way out, me included! :oops:
A gentleman reaches a certain age when he shouldn't be seen blubbering whilst trying to open
the door of his ten year old Vauxhall Corsa!
Take care.
Chin Chin.
Marwood.
That I might drink, and leave the world unseen.
marwood
At Parnassus' foot
 
Posts: 121
Joined: Tue Feb 17, 2009 3:22 pm
Location: Birmingham England

Re: Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Postby jesleeall » Sun May 09, 2010 3:07 pm

Oh, Marwood, and I think a woman reaches a certain age when she shouldn't be sobbing every single time she watches the end of a movie she's already seen too many times!
Saturn, your praise of the movie is even sweeter because of your initial reservations!
jesleeall
 
Posts: 45
Joined: Sat Apr 17, 2010 9:05 pm

Re: Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Postby Malia » Sun May 09, 2010 4:37 pm

I'm so glad you enjoyed the movie, Saturn! I thought the cinematography was breathtaking and it was the one award for which I think it especially deserved to be nominated. There were several scenes in the movie that really spoke to me of Keats's poetical thought and philosophy and seemed almost like one artist's nod of recognition and respect to another. I'm thinking mainly of the scene where Keats writes the Ode to a Nightingale--Fanny sees him sitting under the trees, looks away, then when she looks back, all there is is an empty chair under the tree. I thought that was especially poetic and poignant. I was also struck by the scene where Margaret finds Keats under the hedgerow. The whole setup of that scene (young, fresh-faced girl picking flowers finds dying tragic figure lying under the hedgerow as if half in the grave) speaks of the kind of "light and shade" that marks Keats's poetical philosophy and added such drama to his work.
Stay Awake!
--Anthony deMello
User avatar
Malia
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 1606
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2004 12:55 am
Location: Washington State, USA

Re: Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Postby Raphael » Sun May 09, 2010 5:13 pm

I was quite frankly left emotionally devastated by it, in the truest sense of that word. It was both beautifully acted and written, and ravishing to look at.



I feel the same as you have written above Saturn- and every time I watch it it does not lose that impact. I'm so glad that you have finally seen it!



Although it is very much a film more about Fanny than Keats himself, you do get a sense of how equally difficult and strenuous that whole time was for her, as much as it was for Keats. It was just so understated and realistically portrayed that it would be a hard heart, and a soulless one too that did not find the delicate, beautiful blossoming of their relationship touching, and the final tragedy truly heartbreaking in the extreme.



Yes, this is often overlooked- that it was equally difficult for her- I mean to watch the man you love fading away from a terminal illness who was so young and full of poetic genius? This was heartbreaking for her to deal with- she writes this in one of her letters to his sister. Fanny was as upset about the man she loved dying she was a young poetic genius having his life cruelly cut short.


I love the scene when Brown is telling everyone how John comes to him to tell him Tom has gone and we get a close up of John's tear stained face, Fanny is watching John with compassion and love and then he asks her if she is ok because she is so quiet. Then she gives him the pillow slip and the look of touched amazement on his face is so moving- that moment he realises how much she cares for him as a person and asks to meet her ( a sort of date I guess)and she asks him to come for Christmas. I found this realistic- I think she may have given him little things she sewed- we know she lined his cap with silk for Italy. Jane Campion was clever enough to show that Fanny's sewing was not a vacuous pastime, but one of great skill and that could be employed to give heartfelt gifts.



Well done Jane Campion, you've brought a story to life I think most felt was either unfulfilmable, or not dramatic enough to be seen on the screen.



I think because this film was made out of deep love and respect to them both it was so well made.


Now when are you going to take a similar stab at Mary and Percy Shelly's equally tragic story? :wink:

Oh yes indeed! I wish she would tell the Bronte's story on film- that would be something! Noone has ever put them on screeen. Also what about Robert Burns and John Clare? I wish Jane would make films about all these! Ah, if only I was a film maker- I would specialise in such literary people.
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
User avatar
Raphael
Milton
 
Posts: 1845
Joined: Mon Oct 19, 2009 6:10 pm
Location: wandering Keats' poetry

Re: Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Postby Raphael » Sun May 09, 2010 5:20 pm

P.S. Brown's antipathy [and accent] was somewhat overdone, but I think that was merely for dramatic purposes; in drama there must be a protagonist and an antagonist, therein lies the drama. Paul Schneider performed very well, even when ranting termagant-like. in his quieter, more playful moments you could see a bit of what the real Brown must have been like, and why Keats valued him as a friend.


Yes- he was overdone- I must say I found it hard to see why John would like Charles Brown the way he was portrayed in this film. I can see it from the letters of his (in the link I posted a few weeks ago) but not the way he was in this film- I found him unpleasant in the film.


Abbie and Ben were great as Fanny and Keats, I overlooked all my petty objections [Ben Wishaw's hair, Abbie Cornish being perhaps far too pretty etc] and just went with the roles and seeing them play out this relationship slowly unfolding and then swiftly falling apart was a joy; their subtle and nuanced performances really made me believe it, more than I thought possible.



I found them very believeable as lovers. I like Ben's hair even if it is nothing like John's reddish curly hair. :lol:
I don't think Abbie was too pretty to play Fanny- have you seen Fanny's photo? To look like that at 50, with no make up and hair dye?! She looks no more than 30 in that photo- no wrinkles or grey hair. Imagine what she would have looked like at 18 when he first met her in those beautiful Regency dresses- she must have been a stunner.
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
User avatar
Raphael
Milton
 
Posts: 1845
Joined: Mon Oct 19, 2009 6:10 pm
Location: wandering Keats' poetry

Re: Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Postby Raphael » Sun May 09, 2010 5:52 pm

Malia wrote:I'm so glad you enjoyed the movie, Saturn! I thought the cinematography was breathtaking and it was the one award for which I think it especially deserved to be nominated. There were several scenes in the movie that really spoke to me of Keats's poetical thought and philosophy and seemed almost like one artist's nod of recognition and respect to another. I'm thinking mainly of the scene where Keats writes the Ode to a Nightingale--Fanny sees him sitting under the trees, looks away, then when she looks back, all there is is an empty chair under the tree. I thought that was especially poetic and poignant. I was also struck by the scene where Margaret finds Keats under the hedgerow. The whole setup of that scene (young, fresh-faced girl picking flowers finds dying tragic figure lying under the hedgerow as if half in the grave) speaks of the kind of "light and shade" that marks Keats's poetical philosophy and added such drama to his work.


Well observed Malia!
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
User avatar
Raphael
Milton
 
Posts: 1845
Joined: Mon Oct 19, 2009 6:10 pm
Location: wandering Keats' poetry

Re: Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Postby Saturn » Sun May 09, 2010 6:29 pm

That scene was particularly well done, the physical shock of it and the surprise of it was very well executed.
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
Saturn
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 3939
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:16 am

Re: Bright Star reviews, ratings etc. *SPOILERS*

Postby Raphael » Sun May 09, 2010 6:38 pm

Saturn wrote:That scene was particularly well done, the physical shock of it and the surprise of it was very well executed.


Agreed. I love the way Fanny shows such love and concern in this. The only thing that didn't sit right was Mrs Brawne's hesitation to let him stay- we know that it was Mrs Brawne who answered his knock on the door and insisted he stay.Mrs Brawne loved him like her own son and he loved her like a mother- they were much closer than the film shows.
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
User avatar
Raphael
Milton
 
Posts: 1845
Joined: Mon Oct 19, 2009 6:10 pm
Location: wandering Keats' poetry

PreviousNext

Return to BRIGHT STAR

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests