So, how much do you really know about Keats?

The life of John Keats the man: his family, his friends, and his contemporaries.

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Postby Despondence » Thu Jan 19, 2006 8:02 am

Ah....one of my favorites - actually, one of the first Keats poems I ever read, and where I first came across the word "poesy" :)

But...I cheated... I knew I had read those lines, but couldn't remember where, so I googled :oops: That's a bit of a problem, so much is googlable these days... I'll say - if anyone gets it right without googling I'll cede the win :)

(or should we invent another rule, that if you find the answer on google the question is voided? Maybe the one posing the question could do a quick google search before posting the question, just to check that the anwer isn't the first hit that comes up.. Or maybe that's a stupid rule. I don't know.)
Despondence
 

Postby Saturn » Thu Jan 19, 2006 10:42 am

This is going to get very complicated now :roll:

You didn't answer the question Despondence; the answer is

‘Sleep and Poetry’ 245-7, John Keats, The major Works [Oxford] page 40.
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
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Postby Despondence » Thu Jan 19, 2006 11:45 am

Stephen Saturn wrote:This is going to get very complicated now :roll:

You didn't answer the question Despondence; the answer is

‘Sleep and Poetry’ 245-7, John Keats, The major Works [Oxford] page 40.

Noooooo.....you gave it away :(
Yes I didn't give the answer because I felt I didn't arrive at it honestly, so I would give the others a chance to jump in.. Oh bummer. Sorry for complicating things....(best of intentions didn't help).
Despondence
 

Postby Malia » Thu Jan 19, 2006 3:45 pm

As the person who suggested this game in the first place, I say that it doesn't matter exactly how you find the answer--just that you find it :) Even googling an answer is a type of research and it might lead you to read further into the poem, yourself. I don't consider it cheating. It's research. You don't have to know the answer right off the top of your head--not by any means.

Frankly, I spent at least 1/2 an hour last night whipping through poem after poem trying to find those blankety blank lines, :lol: , but I must have "whipped" too fast as I know I looked through Sleep and Poetry but the lines eluded me!

Ah well. Anyway, Despondence it's your turn for a question! :)
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Postby Despondence » Thu Jan 19, 2006 7:02 pm

Err, well I don't feel I deserve that one. But ok, I'll throw a new one out there and then go away for a while and stop confusing things..

Here's an easy one: which book is often attributed as having awakened the poetic genius of Keats, and how did he come by it?
Despondence
 

Postby Malia » Thu Jan 19, 2006 7:30 pm

OK, here's a pure guess--no sneaking a peak at a book for this one (but only because I don't have my Keats books at hand right now :lol: ).

I think--if memory serves--it was Spencer's Fairie Queene And was it introduced to him by Charles Cowden Clarke, his old schoolmaster and friend.
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Postby Despondence » Thu Jan 19, 2006 8:13 pm

That's the one indeed, loaned to him by Cowden Clarke. As for references, this is probably recounted in every biography, but if you're lazy like me, look no further than the excerpt of Colvin right here on john-keats.com, the chapter "Awakening to Poetry". You're next Malia :)
Despondence
 

Postby Malia » Fri Jan 20, 2006 6:24 am

What was Keats talking about (and to whom was he talking) when he said:

"Why four kisses--you will say--why four because I wish to restrain the headlong impetuosity of my Muse--she would have fain said 'score' without hurting the rhyme--but we must temper the Imagination as the Critics say with Judgement."

Have fun figuring it out :)
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Postby Despondence » Sun Jan 22, 2006 1:18 am

"She took me to her elfin grot
And there she wept and sigh'd full sore,
And there I shut her wild wild eyes
With kisses four."
(La belle dame sans merci)


"Why four kisses--..." Keats wrote in a (long) letter to George and Georgiana Keats, written between 14 February and 3 May 1819, wherein he copied the poem for them. He goes on to say, quite pleased by his own numerological reasoning:

"I was obliged to choose an even number that both eyes might have fair play: and to speak truly I think two a piece quite sufficient--Suppose I had said seven; there would have been three and a half a piece--a very awkward affair--and well got out of on my side--"
Despondence
 

Postby Saturn » Sun Jan 22, 2006 1:24 am

There are whole books written on what the significance of the four kisses is :roll:

Here's my question - what happened to Keats' copy of Chaucer's poems after his death?

No-one will get this I'm sure as it probably isn't mentioned in any of th eKeats biographies.

A clue is that it passed onto someone else - but who?
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
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Postby Despondence » Sun Jan 22, 2006 1:28 am

But - hey....wait a minute now...
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Postby Malia » Sun Jan 22, 2006 2:22 am

Stephen Saturn wrote:
Here's my question - what happened to Keats' copy of Chaucer's poems after his death?

No-one will get this I'm sure as it probably isn't mentioned in any of th eKeats biographies.

A clue is that it passed onto someone else - but who?


I have absolutely no idea about that one. Hmm. . .definitely something to look into, though.

Despondence, you are absolutely correct! It is La Belle Dame and the quote came from that very letter. Bravo!

Now, what have you to give us for the next question? :wink:
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Postby Despondence » Sun Jan 22, 2006 4:47 am

Stephen Saturn wrote:There are whole books written on what the significance of the four kisses is :roll:

Here's my question - what happened to Keats' copy of Chaucer's poems after his death?

No-one will get this I'm sure as it probably isn't mentioned in any of th eKeats biographies.

A clue is that it passed onto someone else - but who?


:arrow: http://englishhistory.net/keats/news.html

"10 September There is a brief mention of Keats in an article about John Clare in the NYRB (unfortunately, it's not online yet but is on newstands.) John Taylor, of course, published both poets - and apparently loaned Keats's precious copy of Chaucer to Clare after Keats's death."
Despondence
 

Postby Despondence » Sun Jan 22, 2006 10:28 pm

So is that the correct aswer, Stephen, that Keats's Chaucer went to John Clare?
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Postby Saturn » Sun Jan 22, 2006 11:16 pm

Damn you - you're right in January 1831 John Taylor lent the book to John Clare.
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
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